Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 26, 2012
Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute announces 2 awards to Group Health
Group Health is proud to have received two Pcori awards -- the only two in Washington state, out of 25 awarded nationally, selected from nearly 500 applications.

Drug shortage linked to greater risk of relapse in young Hodgkin lymphoma patients
A national drug shortage has been linked to a higher rate of relapse among children, teenagers and young adults with Hodgkin lymphoma enrolled in a national clinical trial, according to research led by St.

People with mental disorders more likely to have experienced domestic violence
Men and women with mental health disorders, across all diagnoses, are more likely to have experienced domestic violence than the general population, according to new research from King's College London's Institute of Psychiatry, in collaboration with the University of Bristol.

Drug shortage linked to greater risk of relapse in young Hodgkin lymphoma patients
A national drug shortage has been linked to a higher rate of relapse among children, teenagers and young adults with Hodgkin lymphoma enrolled in a national clinical trial, according to research led by St.

Ability to metabolize tamoxifen affects breast cancer outcomes, Mayo Clinic-led study confirms
For nearly a decade, breast cancer researchers studying the hormone therapy tamoxifen have been divided as to whether genetic differences in a liver enzyme affect the drug's effectiveness and the likelihood breast cancer will recur.

New technique catalogs lymphoma-linked genetic variations
Cancer cells may harbor hundreds of mutations that set them apart from other cells in the body; the scientific challenge has been to figure out which mutations are culprits and which are innocent bystanders.

Doctors call for evidence-based appropriateness criteria for elective procedures
Many of the most common inpatient surgeries in the US are performed electively.

For pre-teens, kindness may be key to popularity
Nine- to 12-year-olds who perform kind acts are not only happier, but also find greater acceptance in their peer groups, according to research published Dec.

New MRI method may help diagnose dementia
A new way to use MRI scans may help determine whether dementia is Alzheimer's disease or another type of dementia, according to new research published in the Dec.

Linguists to gather in Boston for National Conference
Hundreds of linguistic scholars from across the US and around the world will convene in Boston, Massachusetts for the 87th Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America this Jan.

Benefits of higher oxygen, breathing device persist after infancy
By the time they reached toddlerhood, very preterm infants originally treated with higher oxygen levels continued to show benefits when compared to a group treated with lower oxygen levels, according to a follow-up study by a research network of the National Institutes of Health that confirms earlier network findings.

Scientists sequence genome of pathogen responsible for pneumocystis pneumonia
Scientists have sequenced the genome of the fungus Pneumocystis jirovecii, an advancement that could help identify new targets for drugs to treat and prevent Pneumocystis pneumonia, a common and often deadly infection in immunocompromised patients.

Piranha kin wielded dental weaponry even T. rex would have admired
Taking into consideration size, an ancient relative of piranhas weighing about 20 pounds delivered a bite with a force more fierce than prehistoric whale-eating sharks or -- even -- Tyrannosaurus rex.

Immune system changes may drive aggressiveness of recurrent tumors
The traditional view of recurrent tumors is that they are resistant to therapy because they've acquired additional genetic mutations that make them more aggressive and impervious to drugs.

Development of new corneal cell line provides powerful tool
Scientists from the Schepens Eye Research Institute, Mass. Eye and Ear, have developed of HCENC-21 and HCEnC-21T, two novel model systems for human corneal endothelium.

Evidence contradicts idea that starvation caused saber-tooth cat extinction
The latest study of the microscopic wear patterns on the teeth of the American lions and saber-toothed cats that roamed North America in the late Pleistocene found that they were living well off the fat of the land in the period just before they went extinct.

New funding to research 'super material' graphene
Imperial scientists will receive £4.5 million public funds to investigate how

Tigers roar back: Good news for big cats in 3 key landscapes
The Wildlife Conservation Society announced today significant progress for tigers in three key landscapes across the big cat's range due to better law enforcement, protection of additional habitat, and strong government partnerships.

Saber-toothed cats in California were not driven to extinction by lack of food
Even near extinction, saber-toothed cats and American lions likely had enough to eat.

MRI can screen patients for Alzheimer's disease or frontotemporal lobar degeneration
When trying to determine the root cause of a person's dementia, using an MRI can effectively and non-invasively screen patients for Alzheimer's disease or Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration, according to a new study by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

94 percent of high school students accessed social media on their phones during class
94 percent of high school students accessed social media on their phones during class over past year.

Even in same vineyard, different microbes may create variations in wine grapes
Choosing the perfect wine may soon involve more than just knowing the perfect vintage and chateau.

1 step closer: UW-Madison scientists help explain scarcity of anti-matter
A collaboration with major participation by physicists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has made a precise measurement of elusive, nearly massless particles, and obtained a crucial hint as to why the universe is dominated by matter, not by its close relative, anti-matter.

Virtual women reveal more skin, regardless of body proportions
In the virtual world of Second Life, female avatars expose substantially more skin than males, independent of their virtual body proportions, according to research published Dec.

Kindness key to happiness and acceptance for children
Children who make an effort to perform acts of kindness are happier and experience greater acceptance from their peers, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia and the University of California, Riverside.
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