Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

February 04, 2013
Defying the laws of Mendelian inheritance
Two articles published in F1000Research support controversial claims that could redefine what we know about Mendelian inheritance in single Arabidopsis thaliana plants.

CeBIT 2013: Awakening the dormant potential of e-government
E-government holds the promise of gains in efficiency and satisfaction for case workers.

Global land grab brings investment risk, communities react to economic harm, rights abuses
Land conflicts continue to wreak havoc on economic development and human rights around the globe, threatening both the financial health of investors as well as the livelihoods of those who live on the land, according to two reports released today.

Study finds incentive price for reducing HIV risk in Mexico
With a goal to reduce HIV risk behaviors, researchers investigated whether gay men and male sex workers in Mexico City would participate in a conditional cash transfer program that encourages HIV prevention education and regular testing.

FASEB SRC announces conference: Matricellular Proteins in Development, Health, and Disease
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference (SRC): Matricellular Proteins in Development, Health, and Disease.

3D printing breakthrough with human embryonic stem cells
A team of researchers from Scotland has used a novel 3D printing technique to arrange human embryonic stem cells for the very first time.

Physicians' roles on the front line of climate change
Physicians can and should help mitigate the negative health effects of climate change because they will be at the forefront of responding to the effects of global warming, argues an editorial in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Academic institutions added more science and engineering research space in last several years
Science and Engineering research space at the nation's research-performing colleges and universities increased 3.5 percent from fiscal year 2009 to FY 2011, growing to 202.9 million net assignable square feet, according to recent data from the National Science Foundation's Survey of Science and Engineering Research Facilities.

Research suggests meerkat predator-scanning behaviour is altruistic
In order to spot potential predators, adult meerkats often climb to a higher vantage point or stand on their hind legs.

Chili peppers spark discovery
As research efforts go, this one is high risk. Which is to say, it could easily fail.

Paired genes in stem cells shed new light on gene organization and regulation
Research from Whitehead Institute shows that transcription at the active promoters of protein-coding genes commonly runs in opposite directions.

FASEB SRC announces conference: Mitochondrial Assembly & Dynamics in Health, Disease & Aging
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Mitochondrial Assembly and Dynamics in Health, Disease and Aging.

Birds may need a hand to weather climate change
Birds in Asia may need a helping hand to adapt to climate change, according to scientists.

USC scientists design mouse with more human-like immune response
Scientists from the University of Southern California have genetically engineered a mouse to more closely mimic a human immune response.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Signal Transduction in the Immune System
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Signal Transduction in the Immune System.

High supplemental calcium intake may increase risk of cardiovascular disease death in men
A high intake of supplemental calcium appears to be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease death in men but not in women in a study of more 388,000 participants between the ages of 50 and 71 years, according to a report published Online First by JAMA Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication.

Oregon Health Insurance experiment recognized with AcademyHealth HSR Impact Award
AcademyHealth today awarded its Health Services Research Impact Award to work that used for the first time a randomized, controlled study design to answer questions about how access to public insurance affects health, health care use, and other outcomes.

A little tag with a large effect
Ludwig's Oxford researcher Skirmantas Kriaucionis and colleagues at the Rockefeller University in New York published a study on the epigenetic marker known as 5-methylcytosine (5mC).

Into the quantum Internet at the speed of light
Not only do optical fibers transmit information every day around the world at the speed of light, but they can also be harnessed for the transport of quantum information.

A 'nudge' can be the ethical choice
As patients and physicians share decision-making in choices among treatment options, decision aids such as videos, websites, pamphlets or books are coming to play an important role.

20 hours of TV a week almost halves sperm count
Healthy young men who watch TV for more than 20 hours a week have almost half the sperm count of men who watch very little TV, indicates a study published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

Low vitamin D levels may increase risk of Type 1 diabetes
Having adequate levels of vitamin D during young adulthood may reduce the risk of adult-onset type 1 diabetes by as much as 50 percent, according to researchers at Harvard School of Public Health.

Vitamin C supplements linked to kidney stones
New research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, published in the JAMA Internal Medicine, shows that men who take vitamin C supplements regularly run a higher risk of developing kidney stones.

Study highlights important role that patients play in determining outcomes
When it comes to health care, patients with the motivation, knowledge, skills and confidence to manage their own health have better health outcomes and incur fewer health care costs, according to a study led by Judith Hibbard at the University of Oregon.

A sensitive, affordable sensor to detect tiny amounts of CO2
Researchers are developing an ultra-sensitive nano-sensor that could be less expensive to operate and more accurate than current monitoring technologies.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Mechanisms in Plant Development Conference
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference (SRC): Mechanisms in Plant Development Conference.

New study finds water tubing-related injuries up 250 percent
Water tubing, a recreational activity in which participants ride an inner tube which is pulled behind a boat by a tow rope, has grown in popularity in recent years.

Monell scientists identify elusive taste stem cells
Scientists at the Monell Center have identified the location and certain genetic characteristics of taste stem cells on the tongue.

Scientists notch a win in war against antibiotic-resistant bacteria
A team just won a battle in the war against antibiotic-resistant

University of Leicester announces discovery of King Richard III
The University of Leicester today confirms (Monday, Feb. 4) that it has discovered the remains of King Richard III.

$5 million to improve electronic devices
Five University of California, Riverside professors will receive a total of $5 million as part of a $35 million research center aimed at developing materials and structures that could enable more energy efficient computers, mobile phones, and other electronic devices.

TV viewing, exercise habits may significantly affect sperm count
Men's sperm quality may be significantly affected by their levels of physical activity.

Pitt researchers reveal mechanism to halt cancer cell growth, discover potential therapy
University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute researchers have uncovered a technique to halt the growth of cancer cells, a discovery that led them to a potential new anti-cancer therapy.

February 2013 story tips from Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Precise optical imaging is vital for better diagnosis of breast cancer.

Mutations in ASXL3 cause problems similar to Bohring-Opitz syndrome
Mutations which affect the gene ASXL3 cause a novel syndrome similar to Bohring-Opitz syndrome, finds a study published in BioMed Central's open access journal Genome Medicine.

Tropical rainfall patterns varied through time
Historic lake sediment dug up by University of Pittsburgh researchers reveals that oceanic influences on rainfall in Central America have varied over the last 2,000 years, highlighting the fluctuating influence the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans have on precipitation.

Some cancer mutations slow tumor growth
A surprising result suggests that enhancing these mutations' impact could offer a new way to treat cancer.

Injection-free vaccination technique could address global vaccine challenge for HIV, malaria
Scientists at King's College London have demonstrated the ability to deliver a dried live vaccine to the skin without a traditional needle, and shown for the first time that this technique is powerful enough to enable specialized immune cells in the skin to kick-start the immunizing properties of the vaccine.

UTSA math professor named American Mathematical Society Fellow
Manuel Berriozabal, professor in the UTSA Department of Mathematics, has been named an inaugural Fellow of the American Mathematical Society for outstanding contributions to the creation, exposition, advancement, communication, and utilization of mathematics.

UC San Diego funded by NIMH to study successful aging in adults with HIV
The National Institute of Mental Health has awarded a $3.4 million grant to a team of researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine to study successful aging in HIV-infected adults.

AERA announces publication of the 'International Handbook of Research on Environmental Education'
The American Educational Research Association is proud to announce the publication of the

Invitation to the 2nd ESTRO Forum
The 2nd ESTRO Forum will feature new research results in clinical radiation oncology, radiobiology, physics, technology, and brachytherapy, presented by top doctors and scientists from all over the world working together for the benefit of cancer patients.

Your history may define your future: Tell your doctor
In a study published this week in the online version of the Journal of General Internal Medicine, researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital found that patients who use a web-based risk appraisal tool are more likely to have important family history documented.

USDA scientists say mix-and-match cover cropping can optimize organic production
Farmers can fine-tune their use of cover crops to help manage costs and maximize benefits in commercial organic production systems, according to US Department of Agriculture scientists.

'Default' options influence patient choices in advance care directives, Penn study shows
A new study by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggests that for many patients, preferences for end-of-life care are constructed on the spot and heavily influenced by the ways in which the options are presented.

Early breast cancer diagnosis, survival rates low in rural India
Women in developed countries survive roughly 10 years longer after a breast cancer diagnosis compared to women in poor-to-middle-income countries, a new University of Michigan study suggests.

Does the functionality of your small finger determine your ability to master the violin?
The violin is a challenging instrument. Rapid, independent motion of the digital joints in the left hand is desirable.

Antibody hinders growth of Gleevec-resistant gastrointestinal tumors in lab tests
An antibody that binds to a molecule on the surface of a rare but deadly tumor of the gastrointestinal tract inhibits the growth of the cancer cells in mice, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Mini stroke symptoms quickly fade, but patients remain at risk
Each year, as many as 500,000 Americans experience mini strokes called transient ischemic attacks (TIAs).

Mothers' behavior during playtime linked to young children's engagement with them, researcher says
Researchers long have evaluated the roles parents play in children's development.

Shame about past alcoholism predicts relapse and declining health in recovering alcoholics
Feeling shame about past instances of problem drinking may increase the likelihood of relapse and other health problems, according to a new study in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Human brain is divided on fear and panic
Researchers at the University of Iowa say the human brain has a new, second gatekeeper that registers fear.

Hoodoos -- key to earthquakes?
In the absence of long-term instrumental data, fragile rock formations, called hoodoos, may be key to understanding seismic hazard risk.

Chinese Academy of Sciences honors Carnegie Mellon's Edmund Clarke with 2013 Einstein Professorship
The Chinese Academy of Sciences has named Edmund M. Clarke, the FORE Systems University Professor of Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, an Einstein Professor for 2013.

New study shows that gases work with particles to promote cloud formation
Columbia Engineering and Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have published a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences showing that certain volatile organic gases can promote cloud formation in a way never considered before by atmospheric scientists.

NOAA adds red tide alerts to Beach Hazards Statements
NOAA has added a new service to alert the public when red tides threaten human health at Tampa Bay area beaches.

Climate change impacts to US coasts threaten public health, safety and economy
According to a new technical report, the effects of climate change will continue to threaten the health and vitality of US coastal communities' social, economic and natural systems.

Osaka Basin map: Identifies high-rise buildings at risk from quakes
The Osaka Basin, Japan is home to many high-rise buildings that sit atop its thick soft sediments, vulnerable to long-period strong ground motions that last minutes.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Biology of Cilia and Flagella
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Biology of Cilia and Flagella.

In combat vets and others, high rate of vision problems after traumatic brain injury
Visual symptoms and abnormalities occur at high rates in people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) -- including Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans with blast-related TBI, reports a study,

Study suggests glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists related to adolescent weight loss
Preliminary evidence from a clinical trial suggests that treatment with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists was associated with reduced body mass index and body weight in adolescents with severe obesity, according to a report published Online First by JAMA Pediatrics, a JAMA Network publication.

Gene variants found to affect human lifespan
By broadly comparing the DNA of children to that of elderly people, gene researchers have identified copy number variations that influence lifespan.

Beef Up: Middle-aged men may need more to maintain muscle mass
People tend to lose muscle mass as they age; researchers are investigating ways to delay or counteract age-related muscle loss.

Amyloid imaging shows promise for detecting cardiac amyloidosis
While amyloid imaging may now be most associated with detecting plaques in the brain, it has the potential to change the way cardiac amyloidosis is diagnosed.

FASEB SRC announces: Molecular Mechanisms & Physiological Consequences of Protein Aggregation
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Molecular Mechanisms and Physiological Consequences of Protein Aggregation.

Study finds health departments hindered in addressing health concerns from animal production sites
Researchers examined the role of local and state health departments in responding to and preventing community-driven concerns associated with animal production sites.

MU scientists build harness for powerful radiation cancer therapy
In a new study, University of Missouri researchers have demonstrated the ability to harness powerful radioactive particles and direct them toward small cancer tumors while doing negligible damage to healthy organs and tissues.

FASEB SRC announces conference: Renal Hemodynamics: Integrating with the Nephron & Beyond
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference (SRC): Renal Hemodynamics: Integrating with the Nephron and Beyond.

Grooming helps insects keep their senses sharpened
North Carolina State University researchers show that insect grooming -- specifically, antennal cleaning -- removes both environmental pollutants and chemicals produced by the insects themselves.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Histone Deacetylases, Sirtuins, and Reversible Acetylation in Signaling and Disease
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Gastrointestinal Tract XV: Epithelia, Microbes, Inflammation and Cancer.

Survival of the fittest: Predator wasps breed at the expense of spider juveniles
A study conducted in Portugal reveals the dark secrets of two wasp species whose larvae feed on ant-eating spiders Zodarion styliferum.

UCLA Pediatric Medical Home to study new ways to reduce healthcare costs
Researchers with the Pediatric Medical Home at Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA have been awarded a grant from the United States Health Resources and Services Administration to study strategies to help reduce these high medical costs for children with complex chronic disease.

Children with autism at significant risk for feeding problems and nutritional deficits
A comprehensive analysis of feeding behavior in children with autism spectrum disorders indicates these children are five times more likely to have a feeding problem, including extreme tantrums during meals, severe food selectivity and ritualistic mealtime behaviors.

Most clinically advanced vaccine candidate does not protect against tuberculosis in infants
The leading tuberculosis vaccine candidate, that had shown early promise in stimulating high levels of immune response in adults, has not replicated its initial success in the first efficacy trial in infants, published Online First in The Lancet.

Penn study confirms no transmission of Alzheimer's proteins between humans
A new study found no evidence to support concerns that abnormal neurodegenerative disease proteins are

Taking insulin for type 2 diabetes could expose patients to greater risk of health complications
Patients with type 2 diabetes treated with insulin could be exposed to a greater risk of health complications including heart attack, stroke, cancer and eye complications a new study has found.

Survey reveals fault lines in views on climate change
Climate change is a hotly debated issue among many scientists, but a new study published by a University of Alberta researcher notes that geoscientists and engineers also become embroiled in the issue -- and for some, it can get surprisingly personal.

Cells predict onset of graft-versus-host disease in men receiving BMTs from female donors
Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have identified a clutch of cells that -- if seen in a male patient's blood after receiving a brand-new immune system in the form of a bone-marrow transplant from a female donor -- herald the onset of chronic graft-versus-host disease, or cGVHD.

Experimental therapy crosses blood-brain barrier to treat neurological disease
Researchers have overcome a major challenge to treating brain diseases by engineering an experimental molecular therapy that crosses the blood-brain barrier to reverse neurological lysosomal storage disease in mice.

Scientists prevent development of deafness in animals engineered to have Usher syndrome
Most cases of congenital deafness are due to a mutation in a gene that is required for normal development of the sensory hair cells in the inner ear that are responsible for detecting sound.

Finding the way to memory
A new study from the Montreal Neurological Institute -- The Neuro, McGill University, reveals that DCC, the receptor for a crucial protein in the nervous system known as netrin, plays a key role in regulating the plasticity of nerve cell connections in the brain.

Scientists find a key element of lupus, suggesting better drug targets
A team led by scientists at the Scripps Research Institute has identified specific cellular events that appear key to lupus, a debilitating autoimmune disease that afflicts tens of millions of people worldwide.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: NAD Metabolism & Signaling
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: NAD Metabolism & Signaling.

New kind of extinct flying reptile discovered by scientists
A new kind of pterosaur, a flying reptile from the time of the dinosaurs, has been identified by scientists from the Transylvanian Museum Society in Romania, the University of Southampton in the UK and the Museau Nacional in Rio de Janiero, Brazil.

Poor mental health leads to unhealthy behaviors among low-income adults
Poor mental health leads to unhealthy behaviors in low-income adults -- not the other way around, according to a new study by Dr.

Geographic factors can cause allergies, asthma
Those living near the equator may find themselves sneezing and wheezing more than usual.

President Obama awards nation's top scientists and innovators highest honor
President Obama today awarded 12 eminent researchers the National Medal of Science and 11 extraordinary inventors the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, the highest honors bestowed by the US government upon scientists, engineers and inventors.

CeBIT 2013: The armchair as a fitness trainer
Each of us would like to pursue our personal hobbies and interests into old age.

University-developed omega-3-rich ground beef available soon
Beef-lovers will soon have a tasty way to stock up on omega-3s thanks to university-developed ground beef that contains 200 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids.

Avoiding a cartography catastrophe
Since the mid-nineteenth century, maps have helped elucidate the deadly mysteries of diseases like cholera and yellow fever.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open: The Biology of Calpains in Health and Disease
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference (SRC): The Biology of Calpains in Health and Disease.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Hematologic Malignancies
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Hematologic Malignancies.

ASU, Phoenix Children's Hospital expand biomedical research partnership
Brain tumor and brain injury research will be supported by new seed grant program established by Arizona State University and the Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children's Hospital.

Body language can predict outcomes for recovering alcoholics
To predict whether a problem drinker will hit the bottle again, ignore what they say and watch their body language for displays of shame, a new study finds.

The last Neanderthals of southern Iberia did not coexist with modern humans
The last Neanderthals had passed by southern Iberia quite earlier than previously thought, approximately 45,000 years ago and not 30,000 years ago as it has been estimated until recently.

AB blood type strong risk factor for venous blood clots
The non-O ABO blood type is the most important risk factor for venous thromboembolism (blood clots in veins), making up 20 percent of attributable risk for the condition, according to a new study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Mobile DNA in Mammalian Genomes
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Mobile DNA in Mammalian Genomes.

JoVE expands scientific video publication into chemistry
On Monday, Feb. 4, 2013, JoVE will launch the first scholarly scientific video publication for chemistry.

Chemical reaction keeps stroke-damaged brain from repairing itself
Nitric oxide, a gaseous molecule produced in the brain, can damage neurons.

Men are from Mars Earth, women are from Venus Earth
It's time for the Mars/Venus theories about the sexes to come back to Earth, shows a new psychology study.

FASEB SRC announces conference: Gastrointestinal Tract XV: Epithelia, Microbes, Inflammation & Cancer
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference (SRC): Gastrointestinal Tract XV: Epithelia, Microbes, Inflammation and Cancer.

Tuberculosis in Nunavut can be controlled
A combined strategy is needed to combat tuberculosis in Nunavut where the rate is 66 times higher than in the general Canadian population, states a commentary in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

FASEB SRC announces conference: TGF-β Superfamily: Signaling in Development & Disease
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: TGF-Beta Superfamily: Signaling in Development and Disease.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open: Protein Lipidation, Signaling, and Membranes Domains
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference (SRC): Protein Lipidation, Signaling, and Membranes Domains.

20 NASA balloons studying the radiation belts
The mission -- called BARREL (Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses) -- is led by Dartmouth College in Hanover, N.H.

Annals of Internal Medicine tip sheet for Feb. 5, 2013
Below is information about articles being published in the February 5 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Neural Mechanisms in Cardiovascular Regulation
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Neural Mechanisms in Cardiovascular Regulation.

Polar bear researchers urge governments to act now and save the species
A University of Alberta polar bear researcher along with eleven international co-authors are urging governments to start planning for rapid Arctic ecosystem change to deal with a climate change catastrophe for the animals.

Can cancer be turned against itself?
Prof. Yoel Kloog of Tel Aviv University has found that a family of proteins associated with melanoma can alert the human immune system to the presence of cancer cells.

Study shows Facebook unfriending has real life consequences
Unfriending someone on Facebook may be as easy as clicking a button but a new study from the University of Colorado Denver shows the consequences can reach far beyond cyberspace.

In a fight to the finish, Saint Louis University research aims knockout punch at hepatitis B
Researchers were able to measure and then block a previously unstudied enzyme to stop the hepatitis B virus from replicating, taking advantage of known similarities with another major pathogen, HIV.

NASA sees the falling of Cyclone Felleng
Cyclone Felleng traveled through the Mozambique Channel during the week of Jan.

Press registration open for ASM Biodefense and Emerging Diseases Research Meeting
The American Society for Microbiology will host its 2013 Biodefense and Emerging Diseases Research Meeting Feb.

NOAA: Tortugas marine reserve yields more, larger fish
A new NOAA research report finds that both fish populations and commercial and recreational anglers have benefited from

Scientists turn toxic by-product into biofuel booster
Scientists studying an enzyme that naturally produces alkanes, long carbon-chain molecules that could be a direct replacement for the hydrocarbons in gasoline, have figured out why the natural reaction typically stops after three to five cycles -- and devised a strategy to keep the reaction going.

A system that uses video surveillance cameras to alert security agents of dangerous situations
Researchers at Universidad Carlos III of Madrid and the firms Abertis and Solusoft have developed an intelligent system that analyzes video surveillance camera images in real time, detects anomalous situations and alerts the nearest security agents in urgent situations, such as the presence of a vehicle moving in the wrong direction.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Genetic Recombination & Genome Rearrangements
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Genetic Recombination & Genome Rearrangements.

High-dose Vorinostat effective at treating relapsed lymphomas
Patients whose aggressive lymphomas have relapsed or failed to respond to the current front-line chemotherapy regimen now have an effective second line of attack against their disease.

1990s drop in NYC crime not due to CompStat, misdemeanor arrests, study finds
New York City experienced a historic decline in crime rates during the 1990s, but it was not due to the implementation of CompStat or enhanced enforcement of misdemeanor offenses, according to an analysis by New York University sociologist David Greenberg.

Researchers develop Rx for deafness, impaired balance in mouse model of Usher syndrome
Jennifer Lentz, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Otorhinolaryngology & Biocommunications and a member of the Neuroscience Center of Excellence at LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans, is the lead author of a paper reporting that hearing and balance can be rescued by a new therapy in a mouse model of Usher syndrome (Usher) that contains the mutation responsible for type 1C Usher.

Biodiversity exploration in the 3-D era
A group of marine biologists from the Hellenic Centre for Marine Research in Crete are testing computed tomography as a tool to accurately document the anatomy of biological specimens.

Researchers pioneer treatment for viral infection common in children
Researchers at Imperial College London have discovered a new way in which a very common childhood disease could be treated.

FASEB SRC announces conference: Glucose transport -- Gateway for Metabolic Systems Biology
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Glucose transport: Gateway for Metabolic Systems Biology.

New criteria for automated preschool vision screening
The Vision Screening Committee of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, the professional organization for pediatric eye care, has revised its guidelines for automated preschool vision screening based on new evidence.

How plants sense gravity -- a new look at the roles of genetics and the cytoskeleton
The general response to gravity in plants is well known: roots respond positively, growing down, into the soil, and stems respond negatively, growing upward, to reach the sunlight.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Arf and Rab Family G Proteins
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference: Arf and Rab Family G Proteins.

Could the humble sea urchin hold the key to carbon capture?
A team from Newcastle University, UK, have discovered a cheap, quick, safe way of storing carbon that could significantly reduce global CO2 emissions into the atmosphere.

The impressive aerial maneuvers of the pea aphid
A report in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication, shows that pea aphids can free fall from the plants they feed on and -- within a fraction of a second -- land on their feet every time.

Extra-couple HIV transmission a major driver of Africa's HIV epidemic
New research suggests that heterosexual couples in long-term relationships who have sexual encounters outside their established partnership (extra-couple relationships) are one of the main drivers of the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa.

FASEB SRC announces: Mechanism and Regulation of Prokaryotic Transcription Conference
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference (SRC): Mechanism and Regulation of Prokaryotic Transcription.

Low rainfall and extreme temperatures double risk of baby elephant deaths
Extremes of temperature and rainfall are affecting the survival of elephants working in timber camps in Myanmar and can double the risk of death in calves aged up to five, new research from the University of Sheffield has found.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Biology and Chemistry of Vision
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference (SRC): Biology and Chemistry of Vision.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration: Epigenetics, Chromatin and Transcription Conference
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference (SRC): Epigenetics, Chromatin and Transcription Conference.

Little House books' Mary Ingalls probably did not go blind from scarlet fever, U-M study says
Beloved children's book character likely lost sight from viral meningoencephalitis, research highlights how tales of disease influence perception of disease.

New effort to find why replacement hips and knees go bad
A Case Western Reserve University researcher has been awarded a five-year $600,000 National Science Foundation-CAREER grant to create new materials and equipment to test ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene used to make artificial joints.

Monogamous birds read partner's food desires
New research shows that male Eurasian Jays in committed relationships are able to share food with their female partner according to her current desire.

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Ciliate Molecular Biology
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference (SRC): Ciliate Molecular Biology.

Damaged blood vessels loaded with amyloid worsen cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease
A team of researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College has discovered that amyloid peptides are harmful to the blood vessels that supply the brain with blood in Alzheimer's disease -- thus accelerating cognitive decline by limiting oxygen-rich blood and nutrients.

Imaging biomarker predicts response to rapid antidepressant
A boost of activity at the back of the brain while processing emotional information predicted depressed patients' responses to an experimental rapid-acting antidepressant.

Study finds it actually is better (and healthier) to give than to receive
A five-year study by researchers at three universities has established that providing tangible assistance to others protects our health and lengthens our lives.

NASA Goddard astrophysicist wins prize for pulsar work
To say that Alice Harding, an astrophysicist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., has a passion for pulsars is a bit of an understatement.

Study examines potential transmission of AD, Parkinson's disease protein in cadaver hGH
A group of recipients of cadaver-derived human growth hormone (c-hGH) does not appear to be at increased risk for Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease despite their likely exposure to neurodegenerative disease (ND)-associated proteins and elevated risk of infectious prion protein-related disease, according to a report published Online First by JAMA Neurology, a JAMA Network publication.

Around 1 in 10 young mentally ill teens drinks, smokes, and uses cannabis
Around one in ten young teens with mental health issues also drinks alcohol, smokes cigarettes, and uses cannabis on a weekly basis, indicates Australian research published in the online only fully journal BMJ Open.

Sunlight may help ward off rheumatoid arthritis in women
Regular exposure to sunlight -- specifically ultraviolet B -- may reduce the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis, indicates a large long term study published online in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.
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