Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

March 07, 2013
Hannover Messe: Heating with powder and plastic wastes
Disposing of waste - whether it is coating powder or swarf - is expensive.

IRB Barcelona researchers discover mechanism that regulates steroid hormone production in Drosophila
Scientists at IRB Barcelona identify a micro-RNA key to insulin's regulation of steroid hormones in flies.

New study validates longevity pathway
A new study demonstrates what researchers consider conclusive evidence that the red wine compound resveratrol directly activates a protein that promotes health and longevity in animal models.

Highlights on women, minorities and persons with disabilities in science and engineering
Women, persons with disabilities and three racial and ethnic groups -- African-Americans, Hispanics and American Indians -- continue to be underrepresented in science and engineering according to a new report released by the National Science Foundation.

USDA delivers satellite-based vegetative crop condition information service
The U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Agricultural Statistics Service announces the launch of a new state-of-the-art, satellite-based US crop condition vegetation assessment and monitoring service named VegScape.

Despite Olympic fever, British women remain indifferent about sport
A new survey reveals that more than half of British women did not play competitive sport or spend any time on intensive workouts such as running or cycling, in a given week.

PTSD linked to insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, early markers of heart disease
Patients diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder have a significantly higher risk of developing insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, placing them at greater risk for heart disease and diabetes, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Is this peptide a key to happiness?
For the first time in humans, scientists at UCLA have measured the release of a specific peptide, that greatly increased when subjects were happy, but decreased when they were sad.

Higher heart attack rates continue 6 years after Katrina
New Orleans residents continue to face a three-fold increased risk of heart attack post-Katrina -- a trend that has remained unchanged since the storm hit in 2005, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Biobatteries catch breath
An air-breathing bio-battery has been constructed by researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw.

World's leading lion researcher calls for a 'Marshall Plan' for African wildlife
African lions and villagers would benefit from fences to protect them from each other, according to a new study by University of Minnesota researcher Craig Packer published online by Ecology Letters on Tuesday, March 5.

Electronic discharge tool reduces hospital readmissions in heart failure patients
The use of electronic discharge orders aimed at providing evidence-based decision support and clear instructions to heart failure patients helped increase compliance with quality care measures and lowered hospital readmission rates, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Stocking Florida bass in Texas reservoirs may alter stream systems connected to stocked reservoirs
A genetic analysis by Baylor University biologists suggests that the stocking of Florida bass in Texas reservoirs impacts bass populations far beyond the actual stocking location.

Secondhand smoke exposure linked to signs of heart disease
Nonsmokers, beware. It seems the more you are exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke -- whether it was during your childhood or as an adult, at work or at home -- the more likely you are to develop early signs of heart disease, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Vets' PTSD affects mental and physical health of partners
A new study of veterans with PTSD and their partners looks at intimate relationship conflict and finds greater physiological and anger responses for the male veterans as well as their female partners.

Child marriages: 39,000 every day
More than 140 million girls will become child brides, according to United Nations Population Fund.

Japanese researchers succeed in making generations of mouse clones
Using the technique that created Dolly the sheep, researchers from the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe, Japan have identified a way to produce healthy mouse clones that live a normal lifespan and can be sequentially cloned indefinitely.

Long predicted atomic collapse state observed in graphene
Seventy years ago theorists predicted superlarge nuclei would exhibit a quantum-mechanical phenomenon known as

Pan-STARRS finds a 'lost' supernova
Supernova explosions of massive stars are common in spiral galaxies like the Milky Way, where new stars are forming all the time.

Age at first menstrual cycle, menopause tied to heart disease risk
Chinese women are less likely to develop cardiovascular disease if they have their first menstrual cycle or enter menopause later than their peers, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Genomic screening for improved public health
In 10 years' time, routine preventive health care for adults may include genetic testing.

ESCEO13-IOF in Rome: Only 1 month to pre-registration deadline
The pre-registration deadline for the European Congress on Osteoporosis & Osteoarthritis (ESCEO13-IOF) is on April 7 -- only one month away.

High BMI linked to heart attack, stroke in young women
A nationwide study of women in Denmark who are of child-bearing age finds that those who are obese appear to have a much greater risk of heart attack or stroke, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Weight loss linked to higher risk with implanted defibrillators
Even minor weight loss is associated with worse health outcomes among patients implanted with a certain type of defibrillator known as cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Prairie dogs disperse when all close kin have disappeared
Prairie dogs pull up stakes and look for a new place to live when all their close kin have disappeared from their home territory--a striking pattern of dispersal that has not been observed for any other species.

More baccalaureate-prepared nurses in hospitals connected to fewer patient deaths
When hospitals hire more nurses with four-year degrees, patient deaths following common surgeries decrease, according to new research by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing's Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research as reported in the March issue of the prestigious policy journal Health Affairs.

A new material using doped carbon allows fuels to be produced while reducing CO2 emissions
After more than 10 years' work, scientists at the University of Granada have a developed a carbon gel that enables CO2 to be turned into hydrocarbons by electro-catalytic transformation.

U of T engineering breakthrough promises significantly more efficient solar cells
A new technique developed by U of T Engineering Professor Ted Sargent and his research group could lead to significantly more efficient solar cells, according to a recent paper published in the journal Nano Letters.

Incoming! Then outgoing! Waves generated by Russian meteor recorded crossing the US
A network of seismographic stations recorded spectacular signals from the blast waves of the meteor that landed near Chelyabinsk, Russia, as the waves crossed the United States.

Hubble finds birth certificate of oldest known star
A team of astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has taken an important step closer to finding the birth certificate of a star that's been around for a very long time.

Disease knowledge may advance faster with CRISPR gene probing tool
Scientists at UC San Francisco have found a more precise way to turn off genes, a finding that will speed research discoveries and biotech advances and may eventually prove useful in reprogramming cells to regenerate organs and tissues.

Researchers discover 'gateway' in nucleus has a second important job no one noticed before
UAlberta medical researchers and their American colleagues have discovered that the

Engineers develop techniques to boost efficiency of cloud computing infrastructure
Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, and Google have developed a novel approach that allows the massive infrastructure powering cloud computing to run as much as 15 to 20 percent more efficiently.

New hypothesis: Why bacteria are becoming increasingly more resistant to antibiotics
In a revolutionary article published in the journal Archives of Microbiology, a researcher from the University of Granada provides an answer to an enigma that scientists have still not been able to solve.

SAGE reference titles and online library resources honored by Library Journal
SAGE Reference titles and online library resources continue to receive recognition for their excellence.

Rehab associated with reduced risk of death in women with CAD
Women with coronary artery disease who completed a 12-week cardiac rehabilitation program were two-thirds less likely to die compared to those who were not referred to the program.

UTHealth research: Low incidence of venous insufficiency in MS
Results of a study using several imaging methods showed that chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency occurs at a low rate in both people with multiple sclerosis and non-MS volunteers, contrary to some previous studies.

New form of animal communication discovered
Sniffing, a common behavior in dogs, cats and other animals, has been observed to also serve as a method for rats to communicate -- a fundamental discovery that may help scientists identify brain regions critical for interpreting communications cues and what brain malfunctions may cause some complex social disorders.

Support cells found in human brain make mice smarter
Glial cells -- a family of cells found in the human central nervous system and, until recently, considered mere

American Academy of Microbiology releases resistance report
What do cancer cells, weeds, and pathogens have in common?

Changes in heart attack timing continue years after hurricane
The upheaval caused by Hurricane Katrina seems to have disrupted the usual timing of heart attacks, shifting peak frequency from weekday mornings to weekend nights, in a change in pattern that persisted a full five years after the storm, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

CITES: Crucial for conserving sharks and rays
Government delegates to the 16th meeting of the 178 member States of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora convening in Bangkok, Thailand this week can help conserve some of the world's most threatened sharks and rays.

Conference marks double anniversary
To mark the launch of the York Environmental Sustainability Institute, and in celebration of our 50th Anniversary and the Centenary of the British Ecological Society, the University of York is to co-host a major international conference.

Study: Computerized reminders significantly improve HIV care in resource-limited setting
A large randomized controlled study led by Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine researchers is among the first to rigorously demonstrate that health information technology can improve compliance with patient care guidelines by clinicians in resource-limited countries.

Net advantage
Malaria, the leading cause of death among children in Africa, could be eliminated if three-fourths of the population used insecticide-treated bed nets, according to a new study from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis.

Nanoparticles loaded with bee venom kill HIV
Nanoparticles carrying a toxin found in bee venom can destroy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) while leaving surrounding cells unharmed, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.

Small physician practices that care for children unprepared to become medical homes
Primary care practices around the country are being encouraged and even paid to become

Trauma simulation technique makes better journalists
Past studies have documented that new journalists can cause a number of problems at the scene because a lack of sensitivity can lead to unnecessary intrusions, thus further traumatizing victims.

Walk it out: Urban design plays key role in creating healthy cities
Residents of new housing developments increased their exercise and their wellbeing when they had more access to shops and parks, a new University of Melbourne study reveals.

School-based kitchen gardens are getting an A+
Grow it, try it, and you just might like it is a motto many schools are embracing to encourage children to eat more fruits and vegetables.

New gender benchmarking study: India is making slow progress in advancing women in S & T
In the first gender benchmarking study of its kind, researchers have found that numbers of women in the science, technology and innovation fields are alarmingly low in the world's leading economies, and are actually on the decline in many, including the United States.

The American Association of Neuroscience Nurses (AANN) celebrates 45th Annual Educational Meeting
The American Association of Neuroscience Nurses (AANN) will celebrate its 45th Annual Education Conference designed to help neuroscience nurses explore the critical, evidence-based information of its specialty to support a wide range of patient conditions.

When food is scarce, a smaller brain will do
A new study explains how young brains are protected when nutrition is poor.

Cebit Innovation Award for wireless networking of display screens
Alexander Löffler, computer scientist from Saarbrücken, was honored with the Cebit Innovation Award.

UMD study provides new clues to how flu virus spreads
People may more likely be exposed to the flu through airborne virus than previously thought, according to new research from the University of Maryland School of Public Health.

Seaweed under the roof
For many coastal dwellers, seaweed washed up on the shore is nothing but a nuisance.

As Brazil ramps up sugarcane production researchers foresee regional climate effects
Conversion of large swaths of Brazilian land for sugar plantations will help the country meet its needs for producing cane-derived ethanol, but also could lead to important regional climate effects, according to a team of researchers from Arizona State University, Stanford and the Carnegie Institution for Science.

The side effects of statin ads
Television advertising may drive over-diagnosis of high cholesterol and over-treatment with statins, according to a new study by Dr.

First discovery of a natural topological insulator
In a step toward understanding and exploiting an exotic form of matter that has been sparking excitement for potential applications in a new genre of supercomputers, scientists are reporting the first identification of a naturally occurring

French women trailing behind their European neighbors when it comes to sport and exercise
French women are less likely to spend any time on physical activities including sport, exercise or even household chores, compared to women in Germany, Denmark, Sweden and the UK, according to a new survey.

Lizards facing mass extinction
Globally it has been observed that lizards with viviparous reproduction (retention of embryos within the mother's body) are being threatened by changing weather patterns.

Glaciers will melt faster than ever and loss could be irreversible warn scientists
Canada's Arctic Archipelago glaciers will melt faster than ever in the next few centuries.

Fatty acids could lead to flu drug
Flu viruses are a major cause of death and sickness around the world, and antiviral drugs currently do not protect the most seriously ill patients.

According to a study, when we have a low opinion of someone, we tend to reject their money
Researchers from the universities of Granada, Freiburg and University College London have carried out a study that reveals that people are prepared to even lose Money rather than accept it from those they have a low opinion of.

Drugs targeting blood vessels may be candidates for treating Alzheimer's
University of British Columbia researchers have successfully normalized the production of blood vessels in the brain of mice with Alzheimer's disease by immunizing them with amyloid beta, a protein widely associated with the disease.

Test-taking may improve learning in people of all ages
Older adults who haven't been in school for a while are as capable of learning from tests as younger adults and college students, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Biologists produce rainbow-colored algae
What can green algae do for science if they weren't, well, green?

Organizing enzymes to create electricity
An assistant professor at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering has recently received a $360,000 grant to better organize enzymes on electrodes to create nanoscale devices that more efficiently convert the chemical energy of sugars and complex carbohydrates in to electricity.

Engineering the future of health care -- from brain mapping to smarter limb prostheses
A £12.2 million investment in 15 creative engineering research projects, that can deliver major advances in health care, is announced today by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

Tooth loss associated with cardiovascular risk factors in patients with chronic heart disease
Poor dental health, especially tooth loss, is associated with several established cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes, smoking, blood pressure, obesity and other novel risk factors, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

New 3-D reconstructions show buried flood channels on Mars
New maps of the subsurface of Mars show for the first time buried channels below the surface of the red planet.

VHIO scientists eradicate lung tumors in a pre-clinical mouse model
The results, to be published in the journal Genes & Development, confirm that repeated, long-term treatment does not cause side effects.

Advance in re-engineering photosynthesis to make drugs, compounds or ingredients
Scientists are reporting an advance in re-engineering photosynthesis to transform plants into bio-factories that manufacture high-value ingredients for medicines, fabrics, fuels and other products.

Researchers find molecular switch turning on self-renewal of liver damage
The liver is one of the few organs in our body that can regenerate itself, but how it occurs is a biological mystery.

Do-gooder or ne'er-do-well? Behavioral science explains patterns of moral behavior
Does good behavior lead to more good behavior? Or do we try to balance our good and bad deeds?

African-American breast cancer survivors face higher risk of heart failure
African-American women who survive breast cancer are more likely to develop heart failure than other women who have beaten the disease, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Post-stroke walking program improves stroke survivors' lives
Regular brisk walking after a stroke may improve physical fitness, mobility and quality of life.

Patient reports via telemedicine result in lower blood pressure
Using a telemedicine system to engage people in underserved, urban communities to measure and report their blood pressure remotely -- outside of the doctor's office -- appears to help them achieve blood pressure goals and improve adherence to lifestyle changes and medication recommendations, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Using human brain cells to make mice smarter
What happens when human brain cells that surround and support neurons are implanted into the brains of newborn mice?

Illuminating fractures: X-ray imaging sheds new light on bone damage
Using cutting-edge X-ray techniques, Cornell University researchers have uncovered cellular-level detail of what happens when bone bears repetitive stress over time, visualizing damage at smaller scales than previously observed.

The large-scale EU project EU BON: Towards integration with its global counterpart GEO BON
The new large-scale EU BON (Building the European Biodiversity Observation Network) project has held its first conference and Kickoff meeting in February 2013 in Berlin.

Penn researchers find molecular key to exhaustion following sleep deprivation
The biological term for that pay-the-piper behavior is

NASA provides satellite views of Nor'easter on March 7, 2013
The merging of two low pressure areas into a large Nor'easter on March 6 brought winter weather advisories and warnings to the Mid-Atlantic.

How science debunked the ancient Aztec crystal skull hoax
They may have gained fame in the Steven Spielberg adventure film

MARC Travel Awards announced for Immunohistochemistry and Microscopy (IHCM) Short Course 2013
FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for the Immunohistochemistry and Microscopy (IHCM) Short Course 2013 meeting in Woods Hole, MA from March 9-14, 2013.

Lack of aspirin before angioplasty linked with higher mortality
Despite recommendations from leading medical groups, a surprising number of patients are not given aspirin before artery-clearing coronary angioplasty and stenting, and those patients have a significantly higher in-hospital death rate, according to research from a Michigan network being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

New gender benchmarking study finds women greatly under-represented in South Korean STI
In the first gender benchmarking study of its kind, researchers have found that numbers of women in the science, technology and innovation fields are alarmingly low in the world's leading economies, and are actually on the decline in others, including the United States.

Money talks when it comes to losing weight, Mayo Clinic study finds
Weight loss study participants who received financial incentives were more likely to stick with a weight loss program and lost more weight than study participants who received no incentives, according to Mayo Clinic research that will be presented Saturday, March 9 at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Scientists uncover source of ovarian stem-like cells prone to give rise to ovarian cancer
In collaboration with colleagues at Cornell University, a team of cancer researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory has discovered cells with stem-cell properties in the ovary that can mutate to form tumors.

Study finds up to half of gestational diabetes patients will develop type 2 diabetes
Women who were diagnosed with gestational diabetes during pregnancy face a significantly higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes in the future, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Emotion-health connection not limited to industrialized nations
Positive emotions are known to play a role in physical well-being, and stress is strongly linked to poor health, but is this strictly a

New flex-grid system prevents optical network 'traffic jams'
Services like Google Maps use algorithms to determine the fastest route from point A to point B -- even factoring in real-time traffic information as you travel to redirect you if, for example, a parade is blocking part of your route.

Comparing combination therapies for advanced head and neck cancer shows no improvement
A team of scientists reports results of a clinical trial comparing combination treatments for head and neck cancer.

New software could help cut hospital admissions
New software, which will allow GP practice managers to improve healthcare for chronic illnesses including strokes, Alzheimer's and cancer, will be unveiled by scientists from The University of Manchester next week (March 13-14).

The future of ion traps
Recently Science magazine invited JQI fellow Chris Monroe and Duke professor Jungsang Kim to speculate on ion trap technology as a scalable option for quantum information processing.

A cancer-promoting protein is found to also suppress cell growth
The cancer-causing oncogene SRSF1, first discovered through its role in splicing, is now shown also to activate cell-growth arrest, or senescence.

Exercise shields children from stress
Exercise may play a key role in helping children cope with stressful situations, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Better living through mindfulness
Results of a new study suggest that mindfulness -- awareness of the present moment -- may be linked to self-regulation throughout the day, and this may be an important contributor to better emotional and physical well-being.

German women are more physically active than their European counterparts yet remain indifferent to sport
A new survey reveals that 44 percent of German women did not play competitive sport or spend any time on intensive workouts such as running or cycling, in a given week.

Even mild traumatic brain injuries can kill brain tissue
Scientists have watched a mild traumatic brain injury play out in the living brain, prompting swelling that reduces blood flow and connections between neurons to die.

ASPET and BPS partner with Wiley to launch open-access journal
John Wiley & Sons Inc., the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and the British Pharmacological Society announced today their partnership to publish the new open-access, peer-reviewed journal, Pharmacology Research & Perspectives, which will open for submissions in April 2013.

NASA's TRMM satellite sees Tropical Cyclone 19P form
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite noticed areas of heavy rainfall in low pressure System 92P hours before it became the 19th tropical cyclone of the Southern Pacific Ocean.

Age matters in weight gain: Overweight at young age takes toll
Being overweight, especially from a young age, appears to lead to a bigger heart later in life, a condition that has been linked to serious heart problems and even death, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Donated time, a tool for analyzing housework and care
Matxalen Legarreta, a UPV/EHU sociologist, has studied the distinction existing in terms of gender in time distribution.

Study examines global management of anemia in children on dialysis
Control of anemia in children on dialysis varies by region around the globe.

Nobel laureate Roger Tsien, Ph.D., keynotes Cedars-Sinai nanomedicine conference March 15, 16
Nobel laureate Roger Tsien, Ph.D., will keynote Cedars-Sinai's March 15 and 16 Nanomedicine for Imaging and Treatment Conference, which will assemble a multidisciplinary group of nationally and internationally renowned academic researchers, clinicians and representatives from private industry and the National Institutes of Health.

Embolization procedure lowers levels of 'hunger hormone,' leads to weight loss
Suppressing a hunger-stimulating hormone with a minimally invasive procedure was safe in humans and led to significant weight loss for at least six months in a small preliminary study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Earth is warmer today than during 70 to 80 percent of the past 11,300 years
With data from 73 ice and sediment core monitoring sites around the world, scientists have reconstructed Earth's temperature history back to the end of the last Ice Age.

Einstein receives $12 million grant to develop device for preventing HIV infection
Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have been awarded a $12 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop a drug-impregnated intravaginal ring to prevent HIV infection in women.

NIH study sheds light on role of climate in influenza transmission
Two types of environmental conditions -- cold-dry and humid-rainy -- are associated with seasonal influenza epidemics, according to an epidemiological study led by researchers at the National Institutes of Health's Fogarty International Center.

Duckweed as a cost-competitive raw material for biofuel production
The search for a less-expensive, sustainable source of biomass, or plant material, for producing gasoline, diesel and jet fuel has led scientists to duckweed, that fast-growing floating plant that turns ponds and lakes green.

Sniff, sniff. What did you say?
When animals like dogs or rats sniff one another, there might be more going on than you'd think.

ADHD symptoms persist for most young children despite treatment
A study published in the March 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry found that nine out of 10 young children with moderate to severe attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder continue to experience serious to severe symptoms and impairment long after their original diagnoses, and in many cases, despite treatment.

Report offers an in-depth examination of health centers' role in family planning
A report released today by the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services and the RCHN Community Health Foundation offers the first-ever in-depth examination of health centers' role in access to family planning.

NIH awards nearly $2 million to 3 NYC institutions for chronic fatigue syndrome research
Weill Cornell Medical College has been awarded more than $1.9 million by the National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health to lead an innovative research study using advanced neuroimaging and clinical evaluations of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

More Danish women are physically active than their European neighbors, but remain indifferent to sport
A new survey reveals that 1 in 3 Danish women did not play competitive sports or spend any time on intensive workouts such as running or cycling, in a given week.

Pushing the boundaries
Researchers at Johns Hopkins have established a high-efficiency cell-cell fusion system, providing a new model to study how fusion works.

New gender benchmarking study: Brazil succeeding in providing a positive STI environment for women
In the first gender benchmarking study of its kind, researchers have found that numbers of women in the science, technology and innovation fields are alarmingly low in the world's leading economies, and are actually on the decline in many, including the United States.

Reconstruction of Earth climate history shows significance of recent temperature rise
Using data from 73 sites around the world, scientists have been able to reconstruct Earth's temperature history back to the end of the last Ice Age, revealing that the planet today is warmer than it has been during 70 to 80 percent of the time over the last 11,300 years.

New gender benchmarking study: South Africa ranks low on women participating in STI
In the first gender benchmarking study of its kind, researchers have found that numbers of women in the science, technology and innovation fields are alarmingly low in the world's leading economies, and are actually on the decline in many, including the United States.

Worming our way to new treatments for Alzheimer's disease
According to a 2012 World Health Organization report, over 35 million people worldwide currently have dementia, a number that is expected to double by 2030 (66 million) and triple by 2050 (115 million).

Persistence pays off in solving hemophilia mystery, showing curiosity drives discovery
An Australian researcher leading an international team has found the third and final piece in the genetic puzzle of hemophilia B Leyden, more than 20 years after he discovered the first two pieces.

Dual systems key to keeping chromosomes intact
USC scientists have discovered how two different structural apparatuses collaborate to protect repetitive DNA when it is at its most vulnerable -- while it is being unzipped for replication.

Military caregivers aid injured warriors, but little is known about their needs, study finds
Spouses, family members and others who provide informal care to US military members after they return home from conflict often toil long hours with little support, putting them at risk for physical, emotional and financial harm.

Education's protective effect on marriage differs between white and African-American women
Married couples who have attained higher levels of education are less likely to divorce than less-educated couples, but a new study conducted at Rutgers School of Social Work points to significant racial differences.

How to thrive in battery acid and among toxic metals
In the movie Alien, the title character is an extraterrestrial creature that can survive brutal heat and resist the effects of toxins.

Program that pays for weight loss seems to pay off
Modest financial incentives offered over an extended period of time were significantly more likely to encourage sustained participation in a weight-loss program and long-term maintenance of weight loss than an identical program that did not offer financial rewards, according to a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Novel marker helps identify preeclampsia risk in pregnancy
Pregnant women who have a reduced number of capillaries under their skin during pregnancy may be at heightened risk for preeclampsia, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

FASEB MARC Travel Awards announced for the 2013 American College of Sports Medicine Northwest Chapter Meeting
FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for the 2013 American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Northwest Chapter Meeting in Salem, OR from March 15-16, 2013.

Tracking sediments' fate in largest-ever dam removal
Any day now, the world's largest dam-removal project will release a century's worth of sediment.

Land-use zoning may be able to reduce crime in urban areas, study finds
Using zoning laws to shape the type of development and activity that occur in a neighborhood may be one way to reduce crime in urban areas.

'Climate-smart strategies' proposed for spectacular US-Canadian landscape
A new report from the Wildlife Conservation Society Canada creates a conservation strategy that will promote wildlife resiliency in the Southern Canadian Rockies to the future impacts of climate change and road use.

Catching up with catch shares
Ralph Brown runs a 75-foot trawler, Little Joe, out of Brookings, Ore.

Cholesterol levels rise, fall with changing seasons
Cholesterol levels seem to fluctuate significantly with the turning seasons, which may leave some people with borderline high cholesterol at greater cardiovascular risk during the winter months, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Stronger support needed for healthy beverage practices in child care

Support is needed in child care centers to help meet existing water policies and new water requirements included in the 2010 Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act, according to a study published by the Yale Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity.

Heart attack rates rise with plunging GDP in Greece's financial crisis
Heart attack rates have spiked in Greece since the start of the country's financial crisis, especially among women and residents older than 45, according to a study of patient records being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 62nd Annual Scientific Session.

Bees get a buzz from caffeine
You may need a cup of coffee to kick start the day but it seems honeybees also get their buzz from drinking flower nectar containing caffeine.

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