Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 06, 2013
International coalition of researchers finds 6 new Sjögren's syndrome genes
Six new Sjögren's syndrome-related genes have been discovered by an international group of researchers in a genome-wide association study.

Feinstein Institute researchers discover a protein that triggers inflammatory responses in hemorrhage and sepsis
Investigators at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have discovered a protein in the human body that can trigger and mediate inflammation in patients suffering from hemorrhage and sepsis.

Gene activity and transcript patterns visualized for the first time in thousands of single cells
Biologists of the University of Zurich have developed a method to visualize the activity of genes in single cells.

Glutamatergic agents show promise for mood and anxiety disorders
Depression is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide.

Enzymatic pathway common to drugs of abuse could lead to new treatment options
New findings presented at the 26th ECNP Congress suggest that a common enzymatic pathway modulates addictive behavior through genetic and epigenetic regulation, and could lead to new therapeutic options.

How the detergent of the atmosphere is regenerated
It sounds unlikely: a washing machine recycles used detergent in order to use it again for the next load of dirty washing.

Bt sweet corn can reduce insecticide use
A new study published in the Journal of Economic Entomology suggests that Bt sweet corn is better for the environment because it requires fewer pesticide applications than conventional corn.

CSHL neuroscientists identify class of cortical inhibitory neurons that specialize in disinhibition
New research now reveals that one class of inhibitory neurons -- called VIP interneurons -- specializes in inhibiting other inhibitory neurons in multiple regions of cortex, and does so under specific behavioral conditions.

What evolved first -- a dexterous hand or an agile foot?
Resolving a long-standing mystery in human evolution, new research from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute indicates that early hominids developed finger dexterity and tool use ability before the development of bipedal locomotion.

Identical twins with significant weight differences shed light on the phenomenon of metabolically healthy obesity
A unique study of 16 pairs of identical twins in which one twin is obese and the other lean has yielded some surprising results.

Massive DNA study points to new heart drug targets and a key role for triglycerides
A global hunt for genes that influence heart disease risk has uncovered 157 changes in human DNA that alter the levels of cholesterol and other blood fats -- a discovery that could lead to new medications.

Epigenetic markers shows promise in Alzheimer's disease
New evidence presented at the 26th ECNP Congress linking epigenetic regulation with Alzheimer's disease may one day lead to new early diagnostic tests and even novel treatment options for the most common form of dementia.

Enzymatic pathway common to drugs of abuse could lead to new treatment options
New findings presented at the 26th ECNP Congress suggest that a common enzymatic pathway modulates addictive behavior through genetic and epigenetic regulation, and could lead to new therapeutic options.

How binge drinking impairs bone healing
Physicians have long observed that binge drinking impairs healing of broken bones.

Giant channels discovered beneath Antarctic ice shelf
Scientists have discovered huge ice channels beneath a floating ice shelf in Antarctica.

Stress a key factor in causing bee colonies to fail
Extended periods of stress can cause bee colony failures, according to new research published today in the journal Ecology Letters.
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