Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

December 01, 2013
'Nanosponge vaccine' fights MRSA toxins
Nanosponges that soak up a dangerous pore-forming toxin produced by MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) could serve as a safe and effective vaccine against this toxin.

What drives aftershocks?
An international research group lead by GFZ analysed the main shock as well as the following postseismic phase with a dense network of instruments including more than 60 high-resolution GPS stations (Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Dec.

The mystery of neutron stars heats up
Until now, scientists were pretty sure they knew how the surface of a neutron star -- a super dense star that forms when a large star explodes and its core collapses into itself -- can heat itself up.

Human stem cells converted to functional lung cells
For the first time, scientists have succeeded in transforming human stem cells into functional lung and airway cells.

Oregon researchers shed new light on solar water-splitting process
With the help of a new method, University of Oregon scientists have provided new insight into how solar water-splitting cells work.

Marine reserves enhance resilience to climate change
A new study, led by a University of Southampton scientist, highlights the potential for fish communities in marine reserves to resist climate change impacts better than communities on fished coasts.

Colon cancer researchers target stem cells, discover viable new therapeutic path
Scientists and surgeons at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have discovered a promising new approach to treating colorectal cancer by disarming the gene that drives self-renewal in stem cells that are the root cause of disease, resistance to treatment and relapse.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.