Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

April 11, 2014
OU History of Science department receives Sloan Foundation grant
The University of Oklahoma History of Science Department has received a $350,000 grant from the Alfred P.

EULAR 2014 -- Register today!
Registration is still open for the fifteenth annual European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) meeting taking place from June 11-14, 2014 in Paris, France.

Young athletes from higher income families more likely to suffer serious overuse injuries
Young athletes from higher income families are more likely to specialize in one sport, and also more likely to suffer serious overuse injuries such as stress fractures, according to the first study of its kind.

Splice variants reveal connections among autism genes
A team of researchers from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and the Center for Cancer Systems Biology at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has uncovered a new aspect of autism, revealing that proteins involved in autism interact with many more partners than previously known.

Guns aren't the only things killing cops
The public does not realize -- in fact, police themselves may not realize -- that the dangers police officers are exposed to on a daily basis are far worse than anything on 'Law and Order.'

New data reveals positive outcomes for hepatitis C transplant patients
New research announced at the International Liver Congress 2014 today provides new hope for the notoriously difficult-to-treat population of liver transplant patients with recurring hepatitis C.

Sudden loss of consciousness
According to a prospective study (the SPEED Study) presented by Yvonne Greve of Nuremberg Hospital et al. in Deutsches Aerzteblatt International, up to 3 percent of consultations at an emergency department concern a sudden loss of consciousness or near loss of consciousness.

Women with diabetes less likely to have a mammogram: Study
Women with diabetes are 14 percent less likely to be screened for breast cancer compared to women without diabetes, according to a study by researchers at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and Women's College Hospital.

ACP launches High Value Care Coordination Toolkit
The American College of Physicians today unveiled a High Value Care Coordination Toolkit designed to enable more effective and patient-centered communication between primary care and subspecialist doctors.

How nerve cells flexibly adapt to acoustic signals
Researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have shown how nerve cells flexibly adapt to acoustic signals: Depending on the input signal, neurons generate action potentials either near or far away from the cell body.

The 2nd International Symposium on Transformative Bio-Molecules 2014
The 2nd International Symposium on Transformative Bio-Molecules 2014 is an annual event held by the ITbM, inviting prestigious speakers from around the world to enhance interdisciplinary research between molecular synthetic chemistry and plant biology.

MARC travel awards announced for the American College of Sports Medicine 61st Annual Meeting
The FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the American College of Sports Medicine 61st Annual Meeting, 5th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine and World Congress on the Role of Inflammation in Exercise, Health and Disease in Orlando, Fla., from May 27-31, 2014.

Soukoulis wins 2014 Max Born Award
Costas Soukoulis, senior scientist at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy at Iowa State University and associated member of IESL-FORTH in Greece, has won the 2014 Max Born Award from the Optical Society of America.

Immunotherapy could help tackle tough liver cancer
Significant new data presented today at the International Liver Congress 2014 indicate that liver cancer may be treated by adoptive T cell therapy.

MARC travel awards announced for the American Physiological Society 2014 Professional Skills Training
The FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the American Physiological Society 2014 Professional Skills Training Course in Bar Harbor, Maine, from June 23-27, 2014.

New self-healing plastics developed
Scratches in the car finish or cracks in polymer material: self-healing materials can repair themselves by restoring their initial molecular structure after the damage.

Researchers develop ErSb nanostructures with applications in infrared and terahertz ranges
UC Santa Barbara have created a compound semiconductor of nearly perfect quality with embedded nanostructures containing ordered lines of atoms that can manipulate light energy in the mid-infrared range.

AGA and ACP launch toolkit to improve communication between primary care doctors, GIs
The American College of Physicians today unveiled a High Value Care Coordination Toolkit designed to enable more effective and patient-centered communication between primary care and subspecialist doctors.

MARC travel awards for the CYTO 2014/International Society for Advancement of Cytometry Meeting
The FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the CYTO 2014/International Society for Advancement of Cytometry meeting in Ft.

Warming climate has consequences for Michigan's forests
A new assessment evaluates the vulnerability of forest ecosystems within a 16.6-million-acre area in Michigan's eastern Upper Peninsula and northern Lower Peninsula, about 70 percent of the state's forested land cover.

ASU leads new national research network to study impacts of nanomaterials
The Environmental Protection Agency is establishing a new national research network to assess the potential environmental impacts of the engineered nanomaterials that are increasingly used in consumer products.

Facial selection technique for ads can increase buyers by 15 percent: INFORMS Marketing Science
Merely changing the face of a model in an ad increases the number of potential purchasers by as much as 15 percent (8 percent on average), according to a study being published by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences.

MARC travel awards announced for the 2014 Great Lakes Bioinformatics Conference
The FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the 2014 Great Lakes Bioinformatics Conference in Cincinnati, Ohio, from May 16-18, 2014.

MARC travel awards announced for Immunology 2014, the American Association of Immunologists Annual Meeting
The FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the American Association of Immunologists Annual Meeting in Pittsburgh, Pa., from May 2-6, 2014.

Berkeley graduate student brings extinct plants to life
Most fossilized plants are fragments indistinguishable from a stick, but a UC Berkeley graduate student hopes a new technique will allow paleontologists to more precisely identify these fossils.

Greenland ice cores show industrial record of acid rain, success of US Clean Air Act
Detailed ice core measurements show smog-related ratios leveling off in 1970, and suggests these deposits are sensitive to the same chemicals that cause acid rain.

The ATM strikes back
Hot foam may soon send criminals running if they damage ATM.

The Olig family affects central nervous system development and disease
The Olig family affects central nervous system development and disease.

Development of new cell models that report circadian clock function
Researchers at the University of Memphis and University of Pennsylvania report the development of robust new liver and fat cell models that report circadian clock function.

Odds that global warming is due to natural factors: Slim to none
An analysis of temperature data since 1500 all but rules out the possibility that global warming in the industrial era is just a natural fluctuation in the earth's climate, according to a new study by McGill University physics professor Shaun Lovejoy.

Brain cell discovery could open doors to targeted cancer therapies
Fresh insights into the processes that control brain cell production could pave the way for treatments for brain cancer and other brain-related disorders.

Viral hepatitis more deadly than HIV in Europe
Mortality from viral hepatitis is significantly higher than from HIV/AIDS across EU countries, according to results from The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 which was announced for the first time today at the International Liver Congress 2014.

Newspapers follow suit when Danish politicians go to war
Danish newspapers mirror to a high degree the viewpoints of the political elite when Danish military participation in Afghanistan, Iraq and Libya has been on the public agenda during the past 10 years.

University of Connecticut and Comcast launch Center of Excellence for Security Innovation
The University of Connecticut, home to the nation's foremost center on hardware security, and Comcast announce the opening of a Center of Excellence for Security Innovation at UConn.

Nobel prize candidates wait often over 20 years to win their prize
Candidates for a Nobel prize often have to wait more than 20 years to receive this highest of scientific accolades.

Sensitive balance in the immune system
The protein c-FLIPR plays a key role in controlling a 'cellular suicide' process named 'apoptosis.' Scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research have described the significance of c-FLIPR for the immune system in detail: In the presence of an excess of this molecule, mice can fight infectious diseases better, but they develop autoimmune diseases as they get older.

The Lancet Oncology: Challenges to effective cancer control in China, India, and Russia
New report from global cancer experts outlines barriers to cancer care and recent achievements in the three countries with more than half of the world's deaths from cancer.

Devil in disguise: A small coral-eating worm may mean big trouble for reefs
New research from the University of Southampton has identified a coral-eating flatworm as a potential threat for coral reefs.

Two Ames Laboratory science interns are awarded prestigious scholarships
Two participants in the US Department of Energy Office of Science's Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship research program at the DOE's Ames Laboratory have been awarded prestigious scholarships, one from the Barry M.

£34M injection offers new hope for anti-cancer medicines
The prospect of four new cancer medicines becoming a reality for patients has taken a huge step forward with the announcement of the largest healthcare investment by a European private biotech company in over a year.

BLOODHOUND team predicts the impact of the 1,000 mph supersonic car
A new paper from the Swansea University, College of Engineering team working on the BLOODHOUND SSC (Supersonic Car) project has been published on the aerodynamic characteristics of traveling at 1,000 mph.

AWI researchers decipher climate paradox from the Miocene
Scientists of the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, have deciphered a supposed climate paradox from the Miocene era by means of complex model simulations.

Protein researches closing in on the mystery of schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is a severe disease for which there is still no effective medical treatment.

UTSA cybersecurity center collaborates on $800,000 FEMA grant to create cybersecurity consortium
The University of Texas at San Antonio Center for Infrastructure Assurance and Security, the University of Arkansas System's Criminal Justice Institute and the University of Memphis' Center for Information Assurance have received a three-year, $800,000 grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to help states and communities prepare for, detect and respond to cyber attacks in a consistent manner.

The taming of the shrew
The bicolored shrew is a protected species in Central Europe, but these furry insect-eaters have a dark secret.

UAlberta researchers examine metabolism in defective cells
Manipulating the metabolic process in cells may compensate for defects that can shorten cell life.

To be an organ donor, specific attitudes trump general support, study finds
Most Americans say they support the idea of organ donation, yet fewer than half of eligible donors ever register, national polls show.
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