Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

April 18, 2014
Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer
Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center.

Under some LED bulbs whites aren't 'whiter than white'
For years, companies have been adding whiteners to laundry detergent, paints, plastics, paper and fabrics to make whites look 'whiter than white,' but now, with a switch away from incandescent and fluorescent lighting, different degrees of whites may all look the same, according to experts in lighting.

Researchers question published no-till soil organic carbon sequestration rates
For the past 20 years, researchers have published soil organic carbon sequestration rates.

Flipping the switch
Harvard researchers have succeeded in creating quantum switches that can be turned on and off using a single photon, an achievement that could pave the way for the creation of highly secure quantum networks.

Researchers find 3-million-year-old landscape beneath Greenland ice sheet
Glaciers and ice sheets are commonly thought to work like a belt sander.

Religious music brings benefit to seniors' mental health
A new article published online in The Gerontologist reports that among older Christians, listening to religious music is associated with a decrease in anxiety about death and increases in life satisfaction, self-esteem, and sense of control over their lives.

Gecko-like adhesives now useful for real world surfaces
Crosby and polymer science researcher Dan King, with other UMass Amherst researchers including biology professor Duncan Irschick, report in the current issue of Advanced Materials how they have expanded their design theory to allow Geckskin to adhere powerfully to a wider variety of surfaces found in most homes such as drywall, and wood.

More questions than answers as mystery of domestication deepens
A recent interdisciplinary conference that led to the publication of a special issue of PNAS on domestication raised more questions than it answered.

MRI, on a molecular scale
A team of scientists, led by professor of physics and of applied physics Amir Yacoby, have developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system that can produce nano-scale images, and may one day allow researchers to peer into the atomic structure of individual molecules.

Stanford researchers rethink 'natural' habitat for wildlife
Protecting wildlife while feeding a world population predicted to reach nine billion by 2050 will require a holistic approach to conservation that considers human-altered landscapes such as farmland, according to Stanford researchers.

'Exotic' material is like a switch when super thin
Researchers from Cornell University and Brookhaven National Laboratory have shown how to switch a particular transition metal oxide, a lanthanum nickelate, from a metal to an insulator by making the material less than a nanometer thick.

Chronic inflammation may be linked to aggressive prostate cancer
The presence of chronic inflammation in benign prostate tissue was associated with high-grade, or aggressive, prostate cancer, and this association was found even in those with low prostate-specific antigen levels, according to a study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

New research shows people are thinking about their health early in the week
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine analyzing weekly patterns in health-related Google searches reveals a recurring pattern that could be leveraged to improve public health strategies.

New study suggests a better way to deal with bad memories
Researchers have determined a simple and effective emotion-regulation strategy that has neurologically and behaviorally been proven to lessen the emotional impact of personal negative memories.

Plants with dormant seeds give rise to more species
Seeds that sprout as soon as they're planted may be good news for a garden.

Counterfeit contraceptives found in South America
A survey of emergency contraceptive pills in Peru found that 28 percent of the batches studied were either of substandard quality or falsified.

Finding turns neuroanatomy on its head
Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head.

Sun emits a mid-level solar flare
The sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 9:03 a.m.

UT Dallas professor to develop framework to protect computers' cores
UT Dallas cybersecurity expert Dr. Zhiqiang Lin has received funding from the US Air Force to develop a defense framework that burrows deep into a computer system to protect its core.

Frozen in time: 3-million-year-old landscape still exists beneath the Greenland ice sheet
Some of the landscape underlying the massive Greenland ice sheet may have been undisturbed for almost 3 million years, ever since the island became completely ice-covered, according to researchers funded by the National Science Foundation.

Benaroya Research Institute evaluates immunology approach to blocking breast cancer
Benaroya Research Institute received a grant to research how blocking a particular molecule in metastatic breast cancer reduces both the growth of primary tumors and the number of lung metastases.

Ancient DNA offers clues to how barnyard chickens came to be
Ancient DNA adds a twist to the story of how barnyard chickens came to be, finds a study to be published April 21 in the journal PNAS.

NNI researchers discover novel function of protein linked to Alzheimer's disease
A research team led by the National Neuroscience Institute in Singapore has uncovered a novel function of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, one of the main pathogenic culprits of Alzheimer's disease.

Three Johns Hopkins faculty win Novo Nordisk awards for diabetes research
Three Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researchers have been awarded two-year grants for their work on potential treatments for diabetes, Novo Nordisk announced this month.

Impact glass stores biodata for millions of years
Bits of plant life encapsulated in molten glass by asteroid and comet impacts millions of years ago give geologists information about climate and life forms on the ancient Earth.

Impurity size affects performance of emerging superconductive material
Research from North Carolina State University finds that impurities can hurt performance -- or possibly provide benefits -- in a key superconductive material that is expected to find use in a host of applications, including future particle colliders.

Space-tested fluid flow concept advances infectious disease diagnoses
A new medical-testing device is being prepped to improve diagnosis of certain diseases in remote areas, thanks in part to knowledge gained from a series of investigations aboard the International Space Station on the behavior of liquids.

Innovative strategy to facilitate organ repair
A significant breakthrough could revolutionize surgical practice and regenerative medicine.

Treating depression in PD patients: New research
The Sanders-Brown Center on Aging has found interesting new information in a study on depression and neuropsychological function in Parkinson's disease.
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