Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

April 20, 2014
Study of gut microbes, antibiotics: Clues to improving immunity in premature infants
Mothers give a newborn baby a gift of germs -- germs that help to kick-start the infant's immune system.

Big data poses great challenges and opportunities for databases
With the advancement and wide adoption of technologies, data have been created at an unprecedented rate.

'Chaperone' compounds offer new approach to Alzheimer's treatment
A team of researchers from Columbia University Medical Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, and Brandeis University has devised a wholly new approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease involving the so-called retromer protein complex.

Bulletproof nuclei? Stem cells exhibit unusual absorption property
Stem cells -- the body's master cells -- demonstrate a bizarre property never before seen at a cellular level, according to a study published today from scientists at the University of Cambridge.

Dana-Farber researchers uncover link between Down syndrome and leukemia
A team of researchers led by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators has uncovered a connection between people with Down syndrome and having a heightened risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia during childhood.

Computational method dramatically speeds up estimates of gene expression
With gene expression analysis growing in importance for both basic researchers and medical practitioners, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of Maryland have developed a new computational method that dramatically speeds up estimates of gene activity from RNA sequencing data.

Low tolerance for pain? The reason may be in your genes
Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26-May 3, 2014.

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance
Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth.

Stanford scientists identify source of most cases of invasive bladder cancer
A single type of cell in the lining of the bladder is responsible for most cases of invasive bladder cancer, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

Study casts doubt on climate benefit of biofuels from corn residue
Biofuels made from corn stover -- stalks, leaves and cobs that remain after harvest -- appear to emit more carbon dioxide over their life cycle than federal standards allow, according to research led by Adam Liska, assistant professor of biological engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
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