Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 13, 2014
Prehistoric 'bookkeeping' continued long after invention of writing
An ancient token-based recording system from before the dawn of history was rendered obsolete by the birth of writing, according to popular wisdom.

Researchers discover boron 'buckyball'
The discovery of buckyballs -- soccer-ball-shaped molecules of carbon -- helped usher in the nanotechnology era.

Smell and eye tests show potential to detect Alzheimer's early
A decreased ability to identify odors might indicate the development of cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, while examinations of the eye could indicate the build-up of beta-amyloid, a protein associated with Alzheimer's, in the brain, according to the results of four research trials reported today at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference® 2014 in Copenhagen.

Deep within spinach leaves, vibrations enhance efficiency of photosynthesis
Biophysics researchers at the University of Michigan have used short pulses of light to peer into the mechanics of photosynthesis and illuminate the role that molecule vibrations play in the energy conversion process that powers life on our planet.

The Lancet Oncology: Differences in treatment likely to be behind differing survival rates for blood cancers between regions within Europe
Failure to get the best treatment and variations in the quality of care are the most likely reasons why survival for blood cancer patients still varies widely between regions within Europe, according to the largest population-based study of survival in European adults to date, published in The Lancet Oncology.

Australia drying caused by greenhouse gases
NOAA scientists have developed a new high-resolution climate model that shows southwestern Australia's long-term decline in fall and winter rainfall is caused by increases in man-made greenhouse gas emissions and ozone depletion, according to research published today in Nature Geoscience.

The Lancet Neurology: Post-concussion 'return to play' decision for footballers should be made solely by doctors, says new editorial
An editorial published today in The Lancet Neurology calls for sports authorities to take into consideration the long term neurological problems that repeated concussions can cause.

MUHC researcher unveils novel treatment for a form of childhood blindness
An international research project, led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, reports that a new oral medication is showing significant progress in restoring vision to patients with Leber congenital amaurosis.

Antibody halts cancer-related wasting condition
Dana-Farber scientists pinpoint a molecular cause of cachexia, a wasting of fat and muscle occurring in half of all cancer patients, and identify a protein that when blocked might prevent the condition.

Study finds cause of mysterious food allergy, suggests new treatment strategy
New research in Nature Genetics identifies a novel genetic and molecular pathway in the esophagus that causes eosinophillic esophagitis, opening up potential new therapeutic strategies for an enigmatic and hard-to-treat food allergy.

New theory turns cancer on its head
A new theory of how cancer works could lead to the next generation of treatments of the disease.

Stanford researchers invent nanotech microchip to diagnose type-1 diabetes
An inexpensive, portable, microchip-based test for diagnosing type-1 diabetes could improve patient care worldwide and help researchers better understand the disease, according to the device's inventors at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

3D printed anatomy to mark a new era for medical training
The creators of a unique kit containing anatomical body parts produced by 3D printing say it will revolutionise medical education and training, especially in countries where cadaver use is problematical.

Study of noninvasive retinal imaging device presented at Alzheimer's conference
A noninvasive optical imaging device developed at Cedars-Sinai can provide early detection of changes that later occur in the brain and are a classic sign of Alzheimer's disease, according to preliminary results from investigators conducting a clinical trial in Australia.
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