Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 20, 2014
Marmoset sequence sheds new light on primate biology and evolution
A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine and Washington University in St.

Fecal transplants let packrats eat poison
Woodrats lost their ability to eat toxic creosote bushes after antibiotics killed their gut microbes.

New method for extracting radioactive elements from air and water
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have successfully tested a material that can extract atoms of rare or dangerous elements such as radon from the air.

Genetic risk for autism stems mostly from common genes
Using new statistical tools, Carnegie Mellon University's Kathryn Roeder has led an international team of researchers to discover that most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches.

Common gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism
Most of the genetic risk for autism comes from versions of genes that are common in the population rather than from rare variants or spontaneous glitches.

Size and age of plants impact their productivity more than climate, study shows
The size and age of plants has more of an impact on their productivity than temperature and precipitation, according to a landmark study by University of Arizona professor Brian Enquist and postdoctoral researcher Sean Michaletz.

New technique maps life's effects on our DNA
Researchers at the BBSRC-funded Babraham Institute, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Single Cell Genomics Centre, have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents.

UEA research shows oceans vital for possibility for alien life
Researchers at the University of East Anglia have made an important step in the race to discover whether other planets could develop and sustain life.

Speedy computation enables scientists to reconstruct an animal's development cell by cell
Recent advances in imaging technology are transforming how scientists see the cellular universe, showing the form and movement of once grainy and blurred structures in stunning detail.

Metabolic enzyme stops progression of most common type of kidney cancer
Researchers found that an enzyme called FBP1 -- essential for regulating metabolism -- binds to a transcription factor in the nucleus of certain kidney cells and restrains energy production in the cell body.

A noble gas cage
A new material called CC3 effectively traps xenon, krypton, and radon.

Mysterious dance of dwarfs may force a cosmic rethink
The discovery that many small galaxies throughout the universe do not 'swarm' around larger ones like bees do but 'dance' in orderly disc-shaped orbits is a challenge to our understanding of how the universe formed and evolved.

CU, Old Dominion team finds sea level rise in western tropical Pacific anthropogenic
A new study led by Old Dominion University and the University of Colorado Boulder indicates sea levels likely will continue to rise in the tropical Pacific Ocean off the coasts of the Philippines and northeastern Australia as humans continue to alter the climate.

Singapore scientists discover genetic cause of common breast tumours in women
A multidisciplinary team of scientists from the National Cancer Centre Singapore, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore and Singapore General Hospital have made a seminal breakthrough in understanding the molecular basis of fibroadenoma, one of the most common breast tumours diagnosed in women.

Why are more people in the UK complaining about their doctors?
Enquiries made by the general public to the GMC about doctors' fitness to practise rose from 5,168 in 2007 to 10,347 in 2012.

Mixing it up: Study provides new insight into Southern Ocean behavior
A new study has found that turbulent mixing in the deep waters of the Southern Ocean, which has a profound effect on global ocean circulation and climate, varies with the strength of surface eddies -- the ocean equivalent of storms in the atmosphere -- and possibly also wind speeds.

Tiny laser sensor heightens bomb detection sensitivity
UC Berkeley researchers have created a plasmon laser detector that can sniff out tiny traces of airborne molecules of explosives.

Study examines incentives to increase medical male circumcision to help reduce risk of HIV
Among uncircumcised men in Kenya, compensation in the form of food vouchers worth approximately US $9 or $15, compared with lesser or no compensation, resulted in a modest increase in the prevalence of circumcision after two months, according to a study published by JAMA.

Scientists map one of most important proteins in life -- and cancer
Scientists reveal the structure of one of the most important and complicated proteins in cell division - a fundamental process in life and the development of cancer -- in research published in Nature today.

New findings show strikingly early seeding of HIV viral reservoir
New research finds that the viral reservoir is established substantially earlier after HIV infection than previously recognized.

Common gene variants account for most of the genetic risk for autism
Nearly 60 percent of the risk of developing autism is genetic and most of that risk is caused by inherited variant genes that are common in the population and present in individuals without the disorder, according to a study led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published in the July 20 edition of Nature Genetics.
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