Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

July 24, 2014
Link between ritual circumcision procedure and herpes infection in infants examined
A rare procedure occasionally performed during Jewish circumcisions that involves direct oral suction is a likely source of herpes simplex virus type 1 transmissions documented in infants between 1988 and 2012, a literature review conducted by Penn Medicine researchers and published online in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society found.

Cultural stereotypes may evolve from sharing social information
Cultural stereotypes may be an unintended but inevitable consequence of sharing social information, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

Election surprises tend to erode trust in government
When asked who is going to win an election, people tend to predict their own candidate will come out on top.

Test helps predict which children with kidney disease will respond to standard therapy
Among children with sporadic nephrotic syndrome, genetic mutations in the kidney's filtration barrier were frequently linked with a lack of response to immunosuppressive treatments.

Four-billion-year-old chemistry in cells today
Parts of the primordial soup in which life arose have been maintained in our cells today according to scientists at the University of East Anglia.

Stronger early reading skills predict higher intelligence later
A study of 1,890 identical twins has found that strong early reading skill might positively affect later intelligence.

Cuyahoga County high school students smoking at the same rate as adults
Cuyahoga County high school students are smoking tobacco products at the same rate as adults in the county, according to new data from the Prevention Research Center for Healthy Neighborhoods at Case Western Reserve University.

Choice bias: A quirky byproduct of learning from reward
Many people value rewards they choose themselves more than rewards they merely receive, even when the rewards are actually equivalent.

Continuous antibiotics not necessary for many children with common prenatal abnormality
Up to 5 percent of all prenatal ultrasounds uncover antenatal hydronephrosis, or enlarged kidneys, the most commonly detected prenatal abnormality in the US.

Mutated gene linked to both autism and intellectual disability
Autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability often occur together and may even share similar genetic causes.

Earlier Stone Age artifacts found in Northern Cape of South Africa
Excavations at an archaeological site at Kathu in the Northern Cape province of South Africa have produced tens of thousands of Earlier Stone Age artifacts, including hand axes and other tools.

Hubble finds 3 surprisingly dry exoplanets
Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have gone looking for water vapor in the atmospheres of three planets orbiting stars similar to the sun -- and have come up nearly dry.

'Outspoken' Caltech scientist wins 2014 Gemant Award
The American Institute of Physics today announced that Sean Carroll, a physicist at the California Institute of Technology, is the winner of the 2014 Andrew Gemant Award, an annual prize recognizing significant contributions to the cultural, artistic or humanistic dimension of physics.

Western Indian Ocean communities play vital role in conservation
An international team of researchers led by the University of York has carried out the first assessment of community-led marine conservation in the Western Indian Ocean.

Preliminary agenda available for 4th VEINS Conference to be held Oct. 9-12 in Chicago
VEINS 2014 is the premier national venous meeting for cardiologists of all specialties providing comprehensive education for the treatment of patients with venous disease.

Mechanism found for development of protective HIV antibodies
Scientists at Duke Medicine have found an immunologic mechanism that makes broadly neutralizing antibodies in people who are HIV-1 infected.

Assessment on self-care ability of children with spina bifda
Spina bifda is a complex congenital central nervous system disease that is caused by the incomplete closing of the neural tubes during the embryonic phase.

Ferric citrate may reduce dialysis patients' need for multiple medications
Ferric citrate effectively reduced blood phosphorus levels while increasing iron stores and decreasing the need for intravenous iron and anemia medications in dialysis patients.

Monitoring the rise and fall of the microbiome
Close analysis of bacteria in the human digestive tract reveals links to diet and other lifestyle factors.

Joblessness could kill you, but recessions could be good for your health
While previous studies of individuals have shown that employees who lose their jobs have a higher mortality rate, more comprehensive studies have shown, unexpectedly, that population mortality actually declines as unemployment rates increase.

Community service programs that include reflection found to be more beneficial to youth
Using meta-analysis to asses 49 studies from around the world, researchers have found that community service that includes reflection is more beneficial for adolescents than community service that does not.

Metastatic brain tumor treatment could be on the horizon with use of SapC-DOPS
A Cincinnati Cancer Center study, published in the advance online edition of the journal Oncotarget, provides hope that previously studied SapC-DOPS could be used for treatment of brain cancer that has spread.

The microbes make the sake brewery
A sake brewery has its own microbial terroir, meaning the microbial populations found on surfaces in the facility resemble those found in the product, creating the final flavor according to research published ahead of print in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.

Less than 1 percent of UK public research funding spent on antibiotic research in past 5 years
Less than 1 percent of research funding awarded by public and charitable bodies to UK researchers in 2008 was awarded for research on antibiotics, according to new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

Invertebrate numbers nearly halve as human population doubles
Invertebrate numbers have decreased by 45 percent on average over a 35 year period in which the human population doubled, reports a study on the impact of humans on declining animal numbers.

American Society of Anesthesiologists organizations receive ASAE's Power of A Award
The American Society of Association Executives announced its 2014 Power of A Award winners, including two affiliated organizations of the American Society of Anesthesiologists.

RSV research breakthrough to help infected children
Researchers at Le Bonheur Children's Hospital and the University of Tennessee Health Science Center announced results of a clinical trial of a new drug shown to safely reduce the viral load and clinical illness of healthy adult volunteers intranasally infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).

Smartphone experiment tracks whether our life story is written in our gut bacteria
Life events such as visiting another country or contracting a disease cause a significant shift in the make-up of the gut microbiota -- the community of bacteria living in the digestive system, according to research published in the open-access journal Genome Biology.

New imaging agent provides better picture of the gut
A multi-institutional team of researchers has developed a new nanoscale agent for imaging the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

'Experiential products' provide same happiness boost as experiences, study finds
'Experiential products,' items such as books or musical instruments that are designed to create or enhance an experience, can make shoppers just as happy as life experiences, according to a new study from San Francisco State University psychologist Ryan Howell.

Researchers discover new way to determine cancer risk of chemicals
A new study has shown that it is possible to predict long-term cancer risk from a chemical exposure by measuring the short-term effects of that same exposure.

New radiological signs of gastric lap band slippage identified
Researchers in Ohio and Rhode Island have identified two previously undescribed radiological signs of potentially life-threatening slippage of laparoscopically adjustable gastric bands.

Early warning sign for babies at risk of autism
Researchers at the University of Miami find that early joint attention -- such as making eye contact to communicate about a toy, without smiling -- predicts later autism symptoms.

Overweight and obese preschoolers lose more weight when parent is also treated
Primary care treatment of overweight and obese preschoolers works better when treatment targets both parent and child compared to when only the child is targeted.

Synchronization of North Atlantic, North Pacific preceded abrupt warming, end of ice age
Scientists have long been concerned that global warming may push Earth's climate system across a 'tipping point,' where rapid melting of ice and further warming may become irreversible -- a hotly debated scenario with an unclear picture of what this point of no return may look like.

Leaf-mining insects destroyed with the dinosaurs, others quickly appeared
After the asteroid impact at the end of the Cretaceous period that triggered the dinosaurs' extinction and ushered in the Paleocene, leaf-mining insects in the western United States completely disappeared.

LSE and ESC announce the launch of a new executive-style MSc
The MSc in Health Economics, Outcomes and Management in Cardiovascular Sciences aims to equip cardiologists with health management, economics, research and policy skills

Rutgers study explores attitudes, preferences toward post-Sandy rebuilding
A year-long Rutgers study found that individual property owners in Sandy-affected towns are skeptical about the likelihood of community-based rebuilding solutions.

Common blood thinner for pregnant women proven ineffective: Lancet study
A daily injection to the belly commonly prescribed for pregnant women at risk of developing blood clots is found to be ineffective in a clinical trial led by researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and published by the prestigious medical journal The Lancet.

Chemist develops X-ray vision for quality assurance
A Technical University of Denmark researcher has developed a method that uses X-rays for the rapid identification of substances present in an indeterminate powder.

BU researchers discover that Klotho is neuroprotective against Alzheimer's disease
Boston University School of Medicine researchers may have found a way to delay or even prevent Alzheimer's disease.

New hope for powdery mildew resistant barley
New research at the University of Adelaide has opened the way for the development of new lines of barley with resistance to powdery mildew.

Warning: Birthdays can be bad for your health
New research has found that birthday-related drinking is associated with upsurges in hospital admissions among young people.

What constitutes an effective response to the global 'diabesity' tsunami?
This text describes the enormous global efforts expended in the attempt to prevent diabetes by implementing prevention programs in even the remotest communities.

NRL Nike laser achieves spot in Guinness World Records
The world's largest operating krypton fluoride (KrF) gas laser is also the world's fastest, achieving a record projectile velocity equivalent to two-and-a-quarter million miles per hour.

Study shows role of media in sharing life events
To share is human. And the means to share personal news -- good and bad -- have exploded over the last decade, particularly social media and texting.

New research: When it hurts to think we were made for each other
Psychologists observe that people talk and think about love in limitless ways but underlying such diversity are some common themes that frame how we think about relationships.

Stanford biologist warns of early stages of Earth's 6th mass extinction event
Stanford biology professor Rodolfo Dirzo and his colleagues warn that this 'defaunation' could have harmful downstream effects on human health.

Experiments prove 'stemness' of individual immune memory cells
Researchers in Germany and the US have proven for the first time that specific individual immune cells, termed 'central memory T cells,' have all the essential characteristics of adult tissue stem cells.

University of Delaware researcher describes new approach for creating organic zeolites
In a landmark paper published in the international scientific journal Nature Communications, University of Delaware researcher Yushan Yan describes a new approach to creating organic zeolites.

Global wildlife decline driving slave labor, organized crime
Global decline of wildlife populations is driving increases in violent conflicts, organized crime and child labor around the world, according to a policy paper led by UC Berkeley researchers.

Piggy-backing cells hold clue to skin cancer growth
Skin Cancer cells work together to spread further and faster, according to a new study published in Cell Reports.

Moose drool inhibits growth of toxic fungus: York U research
Research out of York University shows a surprisingly effective way to fight against a certain species of toxic grass fungus: moose saliva -- yes, moose saliva.

Penn study: Incisionless transcatheter aortic valve replacement surgery cuts hospital length of stay
New research from Penn Medicine shows that incisionless transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery cuts length of hospital stay by 30 percent and has no impact on post-operative vascular complication rates when compared with conventional transfemoral TAVR, which requires an incision in the groin.

Jackson Laboratory researchers find new mechanism for neurodegeneration
A research team led by Jackson Laboratory professor and Howard Hughes investigator Susan Ackerman, Ph.D., have pinpointed a surprising mechanism behind neurodegeneration in mice, one that involves a defect in a key component of the cellular machinery that makes proteins, known as transfer RNA or tRNA.

Seeing the same GP at every visit will reduce emergency department attendance
Attendances at emergency departments can be reduced by enabling patients to see the same GP every time they visit their doctor's surgery.

Parched West is using up underground water, UCI, NASA find
A new study by University of California, Irvine and NASA scientists finds more than 75 percent of the water loss in the drought-stricken Colorado River Basin since late 2004 came from underground resources.

A protein couple controls flow of information into the brain's memory center
Neuroscientists in Bonn and Heidelberg have succeeded in providing new insights into how the brain works.

ORNL study reveals new characteristics of complex oxide surfaces
A combination of microscopy and data processing has given researchers an unprecedented look at the surface of a material known for its unusual physical and electrochemical properties.

Increased risk for head, neck cancers in patients with diabetes
Diabetes mellitus appears to increase the risk for head and neck cancer.

Incomplete HPV vaccination may offer some protection
Minority women who received the human papillomavirus vaccination even after becoming sexually active had lower rates of abnormal Pap test results than those who were never vaccinated.

IUPUI mathematician receives prestigious NSF Early Career Development Award
Dr. Roland Roeder, a mathematician from the School of Science at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, will receive $460,000 over the next five years from the National Science Foundation's Division of Mathematical Sciences to support his research in pure math and the training of students from the graduate to high school levels.

Wireless home automation systems reveal more than you would think about user behavior
Home automation systems that control domestic lighting, heating, window blinds or door locks offer opportunities for third parties to intrude on the privacy of the inhabitants and gain considerable insight into their behavioral patterns.

One route to malaria drug resistance found
Researchers have uncovered a way the malaria parasite becomes resistant to an investigational drug.

Gene changes in breast cancer cells pinpointed with new computational method
Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University, working with high-throughput data generated by breast cancer biologists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, have devised a computational method to determine how gene networks are rewired as normal breast cells turn malignant and as they respond to potential cancer therapy agents.

Neiker-Tecnalia is researching the potato genes that best adapt to climate change
Neiker-Tecnalia is currently conducting research into the potato genes that best adapt to the anticipated climate change conditions, characterised by a reduction in rainfall and increased extremes of hot and cold temperatures.

Pesticide linked to 3 generations of disease
Washington State University researchers say ancestral exposures to the pesticide methoxychlor may lead to adult onset kidney disease, ovarian disease and obesity in future generations.

NRG1 isoforms could be an effective therapeutic candidate to promote peripheral nerve regeneration
Neuregulin 1 is a pleiotropic factor characterized by the existence of numerous isoforms arising from alternative splicing of exons that confer to the protein deeply different characteristics.

Shift work linked to heightened risk of type 2 diabetes
Shift work is linked to a heightened risk of developing type 2 diabetes, with the risk seemingly greatest among men and those working rotating shift patterns, indicates an analysis of the available evidence published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

Female triathletes at risk for pelvic floor disorders and other complications
Female triathletes are at risk for pelvic floor disorders, decreased energy, menstrual irregularities and abnormal bone density, according to researchers at Loyola University Health System.

Rutgers University-Newark wins $3.5 million federal grant to boost minorities in STEM
Rutgers University-Newark has received a $3.5 million grant to continue its efforts in leading a statewide program to increase minority representation in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields.

Fires in Central Africa during July 2014
Hundreds of fires covered central Africa in mid-July 2014, as the annual fire season continues across the region.

Malcolm K. Brenner receives Pioneer Award for advances in gene-modified T cells targeting cancer
Malcolm K. Brenner, M.D., Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine has devoted his career in basic and clinical research toward understanding how tumors are able to escape detection by the body's immune defense system, and developing genetically modified T cells that can effectively target tumors.

Identified a key molecule in flies that adjusts energy use under starvation conditions
In the study, published today in Cell Reports, the IRB Barcelona scientists show that in the fly Drosophila melanogaster, p53 is activated in certain cells to adapt the metabolic response to nutrient deprivation, thus having a global effect on the organism.

It takes two to court
Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, have identified the functions of two classes of pheromone receptors, and found pheromones crucial to triggering the mating process in mice.

Formula calculates thickness of bombproof concrete
A new type of steel-reinforced concrete protects buildings better from bomb attacks.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine receives grant from the Michael J. Fox Foundation to fund drug discovery project targeting Parkinson's
Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have received a grant from the Michael J.

Atomic structure of key muscle component revealed in Penn study
Adding to the growing fundamental understanding of the machinery of muscle cells, a group of biophysicists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania describe in the journal Science this week -- in minute detail -- how actin filaments are stabilized at one of their ends to form a basic muscle structure called the sarcomere.

Whitehead Institute researchers create 'naïve' pluripotent human embryonic stem cells
Embryonic stem cell research has been hampered by the inability to transfer research and tools from mouse ESC studies to their human counterparts, in part because human ESCs are 'primed' and slightly less plastic than the mouse cells.

Highest-precision measurement of water in planet outside the solar system
The discovery of water vapour in the atmospheres of three exoplanets includes the most precise measurement of any chemical in a planet outside the solar system, and has major implications for planet formation and the search for water on Earth-like habitable exoplanets in future.

Farmers market vouchers may boost produce consumption in low-income families
Vouchers to buy fresh fruits and vegetables at farmers markets increase the amount of produce in the diets of some families on food assistance, according to research led by New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

Miriam Hospital physician advocates awareness, collaboration to combat peaking hep C virus
Lynn E. Taylor, M.D., director of The Miriam Hospital's HIV/Viral Hepatitis Coinfection program, states in a commentary in the July, 2014 Rhode Island Medical Journal special edition, 'RI Defeats Hep C' that eliminating hepatitis C virus infection is feasible, can provide economic benefits, enhance capacity to address other health challenges, and improve health care disparities.

Natural products from plants protect skin during cancer radiotherapy
Plant-derived natural product chemicals could offer protection to the skin from the harmful effects of gamma radiation during cancer radiotherapy, suggests research published in the International Journal of Low Radiation.

A world first: Researchers identify a treatment that prevents tumor metastasis
Metastasis, the strategy adopted by tumor cells to transform into an aggressive form of cancer, are often associated with a gloomy prognosis.

CDC reports annual financial cost of COPD to be $36 billion in the United States
American College of Chest Physicians announced today the online first publication of 'Total and state-specific medical and absenteeism costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among adults aged ≥18 years in the United States for 2010 and projections through 2020.'

New study draws links between wildlife loss and social conflicts
Citing many sobering examples of how wildlife loss leads to conflict among people around the world, a new article co-authored by Wildlife Conservation Society Health & Ecosystems: Analysis of Linkages program director Dr.

Neurologic recovery from corticospinal tract injury due to subfalcine herniation
After development of diffusion tensor tractography, which is derived from diffusion tensor imaging, three-dimensional reconstruction and estimation for three motor tracts, such as the corticospinal tract, the rubrospinal tract, and the corticoreticular pathway became possible.

8.2 percent of our DNA is 'functional'
Only 8.2 percent of human DNA is likely to be doing something important -- is 'functional' -- say Oxford University researchers.

Immune response may cause harm in brain injuries, disorders
Could the body's own immune system play a role in memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction associated with conditions like chronic epilepsy, Alzheimer's dementia and concussions?

Study indicates large raptors in Africa used for bushmeat
Bushmeat, the use of native animal species for food or commercial food sale, has been heavily documented to be a significant factor in the decline of many species of primates and other mammals.

Background TV can be bad for kids
Leaving the television on can be detrimental to children's learning and development, according to a new study from the University of Iowa.

New approach to form non-equilibrium structures
Northwestern University researchers get closer to understanding the fundamentals of non-equilibrium, self-assembled structures, unlocking potential in a variety of fields.

Zerenex (ferric citrate) long-term Phase 3 study results published in JASN
Keryx Biopharmaceuticals Inc. announced the publication of results from the long-term, randomized, active control Phase 3 study of Zerenex (ferric citrate), the Company's investigational oral ferric iron-based phosphate binder, for the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis.

Could age of first period influence development of diseases in older women?
A novel study shows that the age girls reach puberty is influenced by 'imprinted genes' -- a subset of genes whose activity differs depending on which parent contributes the gene.

Creating sustainable STEM teacher preparation programs
A new study finds that faculty members who choose to champion physics teacher education, in combination with institutional motivation and commitment, ensure that STEM teacher education programs remain viable after initial funding ends.

NYSCF scientists one step closer to cell therapy for multiple sclerosis patients
For the first time, NYSCF scientists generated induced pluripotent stem cells lines from skin samples of patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis and further, they developed an accelerated protocol to induce these stem cells into becoming oligodendrocytes, the myelin-forming cells of the central nervous system implicated in multiple sclerosis and many other diseases.

Newly discovered gut virus lives in half the world's population
Odds are, there's a virus living inside your gut that has gone undetected by scientists for decades.

Using media as a stress reducer can lead to feelings of guilt and failure
After a long day at work, sometimes you just want to turn on the TV or play a video game to relax.

Stress tied to change in children's gene expression related to emotion regulation, physical health
In a new study, researchers found that maltreatment affects the way children's genes are activated, which has implications for their long-term development and health.

New mass map of a distant galaxy cluster is the most precise yet
Astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have mapped the mass within a galaxy cluster more precisely than ever before.

New methods of detecting Salmonella in pork meat processing
Infections caused by food-borne microorganisms are an increasing public health burden.

Nano-supercapacitors for electric cars
Innovative nano-material based supercapacitors are set to bring mass market appeal a good step closer to the lukewarm public interest in Germany.

UCSF researchers uncover an unexpected role for endostatin in the nervous system
Researchers at UC San Francisco have discovered that endostatin, a protein that once aroused intense interest as a possible cancer treatment, plays a key role in the stable functioning of the nervous system.

Corn and soy insecticides similar to nicotine found widespread in Midwest rivers -- USGS news
Insecticides similar to nicotine, known as neonicotinoids, were found commonly in streams throughout the Midwest, according to a new USGS study.

Narcissistic CEOs and financial performance
Narcissism, considered by some as the 'dark side of the executive personality,' may actually be a good thing when it comes to certain financial measures, with companies led by narcissistic CEOs outperforming those helmed by non-narcissistic executives, according to recent research co-authored by faculty at the USC Marshall School of Business.

New drugs to combat asthma and the like
Science and industry are collaborating to develop future pharmaceuticals for treating chronic inflammatory diseases.

Wives with more education than their husbands no longer at increased risk of divorce
For decades, couples in which a wife had more education than her husband faced a higher risk of divorce than those in which a husband had more education, but a new study finds this is no longer the case.

Noise pollution impacts fish species differently
Acoustic disturbance has different effects on different species of fish, according to a new study from the universities of Bristol and Exeter which tested fish anti-predator behavior.

Artificial intelligence identifies the musical progression of the Beatles
Computer scientists at Lawrence Technological University have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that can analyze and compare musical styles, which they have used to study the musical progression of the Beatles.

New research suggests Saharan dust is key to the formation of Bahamas' Great Bank
A new study suggests that Saharan dust played a major role in the formation of the Bahamas islands.

Experiences at every stage of life contribute to cognitive abilities in old age
Early life experiences, such as childhood socioeconomic status and literacy, may have greater influence on the risk of cognitive impairment late in life than such demographic characteristics as race and ethnicity, a large study by researchers with the UC Davis Alzheimer's Disease Center and the University of Victoria, Canada, has found.

Unleashing the power of quantum dot triplets
Quantum computers have yet to materialize. Yet, scientists are making progress in devising suitable means of making such computers faster.

TGen-led study seeks to understand why some HIV-positive men are more infectious
A new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute provides insights into the interplay among bacteria, viruses and the immune system during HIV infection.

Stanford study shows how to power California with wind, water and sun
New Stanford research outlines the path to a possible future for California in which renewable energy creates a healthier environment, generates jobs and stabilizes energy prices.

Study gives new perspective on agricultural plastic, debris burning, and air quality
A recent study published in the Journal of the Air and Water Association shows that inclusion of agricultural plastic in debris piles has no effect on smoke emissions.

No returning to Eden: Researchers explore how to restore species in a changing world
Reversing the increasing rate of global biodiversity losses may not be possible without embracing intensive, and sometimes controversial, forms of threatened species management, according to a New Zealand zoologist and colleagues writing in the leading international journal Science.

Fukushima accident underscores need for US to seek out new information about nuclear plant hazards
A new congressionally mandated report from the National Academy of Sciences concludes that the overarching lesson learned from the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident is that nuclear plant licensees and their regulators must actively seek out and act on new information about hazards with the potential to affect the safety of nuclear plants.

Biomedical engineer looks at new applications for novel lupus drug
Expanding on his work with a new drug that successfully treated lupus in mice, a biomedical engineer at the University of Houston has received a $250,000 grant to expand his research to a new version of the drug in an effort to treat a wider range of autoimmune diseases.

UTHealth Dr. Bhavani Iyer awarded low vision grant
Bhavani Iyer, O.D., a low vision specialist at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Medical School, has been awarded a grant to help Harris County residents whose vision problems cannot be corrected with eyeglasses, medication or surgery.

Experts weigh the pros and cons of a $1.7 billion EPA cleanup plan for the Passaic River at an NJIT forum
Environmental cleanup experts gathered at the New Jersey Institute of Technology this week for an all-day public forum on a $1.7 billion proposal by the Environmental Protection Agency to dredge toxic sediment from an eight-mile stretch of the lower Passaic River.

Brain's dynamic duel underlies win-win choices
People choosing between two or more equally positive outcomes experience paradoxical feelings of pleasure and anxiety, feelings associated with activity in different regions of the brain, according to research led by Amitai Shenhav, an associate research scholar at the Princeton Neuroscience Institute at Princeton University.

Astronomers come up dry in search for water on exoplanets
A team of astronomers has made the most precise measurements yet of water vapor in the atmospheres of Jupiter-like planets beyond our solar system and found between ten and a thousand times less water vapor than what models predict.

Singapore team develops Asia's first genetic test that can prevent corneal blindness
A team of eye doctors and scientists from Singapore have developed Asia's first genetic test for identifying patients with a type of eye disease that affects the cornea called corneal stromal dystrophy which can lead to blurring and loss of vision.

Linking the microbial and immune environment in semen to HIV viral load and transmission
Research published in PLOS Pathogens reports that HIV infection re-shapes the relationship between semen bacteria and immune factors which in turn affects viral load, suggesting that the semen microbiome plays a role in sexual transmission of HIV.

Teens pay high psychiatric toll when raised in conditions of political conflict
A new study by Professor Michelle Slone of Tel Aviv University finds that Israeli youths exposed to protracted conflict suffer far higher levels of anxiety, phobia, fear, depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, and paranoia than their counterparts in the US.

Antioxidant biomaterial promotes healing
Created by Northwestern University professor Guillermo Ameer and his team, the first-ever inherently antioxidant biomaterial has the potential to prevent failure in medical devices and surgical implants.
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