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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | October 19, 2014


Group B streptococcus incidence rises significantly among newborns
Group B streptococcus, a major cause of serious infectious diseases including sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia, has increased by about 60 percent among infants younger than three months in the Netherlands over the past 25 years despite the widespread use of prevention strategies, new research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases has found.
Many older people have mutations linked to leukemia, lymphoma in their blood cells
At least 2 percent of people over age 40 and 5 percent of people over 70 have mutations linked to leukemia and lymphoma in their blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
New insight that 'mega' cells control the growth of blood-producing cells
While megakaryocytes are best known for producing platelets that heal wounds, these 'mega' cells found in bone marrow also play a critical role in regulating stem cells according to new research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research.
Panic attacks associated with fear of bright daylight
Fear of bright daylight is associated with panic disorder, according to new presented at the ECNP congress in Berlin.
Chinese power: Challenges and R&D opportunities of smart distribution grids
Smart grid has been a key development strategy of energy in China.
Improved electricity access has little impact on climate change
Expanding access to household electricity services accounts for only a small portion of total emission growth, shows a new study from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, shedding light on an ongoing debate on potential conflicts between climate and development.
New research shows fish intake associated with boost to antidepressant response
Up to half of patients who suffer from depression do not respond to treatment with SSRIs.
Major breakthrough could help detoxify pollutants
Scientists at The University of Manchester hope a major breakthrough could lead to more effective methods for detoxifying dangerous pollutants like PCBs and dioxins.
Women more likely to develop anxiety and depression after heart attack
Patients with depression are nearly six times more likely to die within six months after a heart attack than those without depression.
Crystallizing the DNA nanotechnology dream
For the last 20 years, scientists have tried to design large DNA crystals with precisely prescribed depth and complex features -- a design quest just fulfilled by a team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering.
Scientists identify mutation associated with cleft palate in humans and dogs
Scientists studying birth defects in humans and purebred dogs have identified an association between cleft lip and cleft palate -- conditions that occur when the lip and mouth fail to form properly during pregnancy -- and a mutation in the ADAMTS20 gene.
I have anxiety, why is my doctor prescribing an antipsychotic?
What's in a name? Doctors have found that the name of the drug you are prescribed significantly influences how the patient sees the treatment.
Aspirin shown to benefit schizophrenia treatment
A new study shows that some anti-inflammatory medicines, such as aspirin, estrogen, and Fluimucil, can improve the efficacy of existing schizophrenia treatments.
Lab-developed intestinal organoids form mature human tissue in mice
Researchers have successfully transplanted 'organoids' of functioning human intestinal tissue grown from pluripotent stem cells in a lab dish into mice -- creating an unprecedented model for studying diseases of the intestine.
Metabolic genetics research paves way to treating diabetes and obesity
Breaking down complex conditions such as Type 2 diabetes and obesity into the specific metabolic proteins and processes that underlie them offers a new approach to studying the genetics of these diseases and how they are interrelated, according to research presented today at the American Society of Human Genetics 2014 Annual Meeting in San Diego.
Research reveals likelihood, onset of MS diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease
The results of the largest retrospective study of multiple sclerosis in uveitis patients has revealed that nearly 60 percent of patients with both diseases were diagnosed with each within a five-year span.
Head injury causes the immune system to attack the brain
Scientists have uncovered a surprising way to reduce the brain damage caused by head injuries -- stopping the body's immune system from killing brain cells.
Children's genes affect their mothers' risk of rheumatoid arthritis
A child's genetic makeup may contribute to his or her mother's risk of rheumatoid arthritis, possibly explaining why women are at higher risk of developing the disease than men.
Imaging electric charge propagating along microbial nanowires
UMass Amherst physicists working with Derek Lovley and colleagues report in the current issue of Nature Nanotechnology that they've used a new imaging technique, electrostatic force microscopy, to resolve the biological debate with evidence from physics, showing that electric charges do indeed propagate along microbial nanowires just as they do in carbon nanotubes, a highly conductive man-made material.
Viagra protects the heart beyond the bedroom
Viagra could be used as a safe treatment for heart disease, finds new research published today in the open-access journal BMC Medicine.
Tear duct implant effective at reducing pain and inflammation in cataract surgery patients
The first tear duct implant developed to treat inflammation and pain following cataract surgery has been shown to be a reliable alternative to medicated eye drops, which are the current standard of care, according to a study presented today at AAO 2014, the 118th annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

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