Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

October 23, 2014
Reminiscing can help boost mental performance
New research led by Cornell University neuroscientist Nathan Spreng shows for the first time that engaging brain areas linked to so-called 'off-task' mental activities (such as mind-wandering and reminiscing) can actually boost performance on some challenging mental tasks.

Researchers highlight acousto-optic tunable filter technology for balloon-borne platforms
A balloon-borne acousto-optic tunable filter hyperspectral imager is ideally suited to address numerous outstanding questions in planetary science.

Music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have discovered that music therapy reduces depression in children and adolescents with behavioural and emotional problems.

Recent advances in the tribology and bioengineering of the skin
The objective of this seminar is to present state-of-the-art experimental and modelling techniques to characterise and predict the biophysics and tribology of the skin in health and disease.

Seismic network will measure the effects of ocean waves on Antarctic ice shelves
Starting in November, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego, researchers and colleagues will embark on an ambitious and arduous mission funded by the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs to install a seismic array on Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf.

Costs to treat bleeding strokes increases 10 years later
Costs to treat strokes caused by bleeding in the brain increased about 31 percent from five years after stroke to 10 years.

Bradley Hospital finds sleep difficulties common among toddlers with psychiatric disorders
John Boekamp, Ph.D., clinical director of the Pediatric Partial Hospital Program at Bradley Hospital recently led a study that found sleep difficulties -- particularly problems with falling asleep -- were very common among toddlers and preschool-aged children who were receiving clinical treatment for a wide range of psychiatric disorders.

Herbal medicines could contain dangerous levels of toxic mold
Herbal medicines such as licorice, Indian rennet and opium poppy, are at risk of contamination with toxic mold, according to a new study published in Fungal Biology.

'Watch' cites concern about flexible reamer breakage during anatomic ACL reconstruction
JBJS Case Connector, an online case journal published by the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, has issued a 'Watch' regarding concerns over flexible reamer breakage during anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction.

No-till agriculture may not bring hoped-for boost in global crop yields, study finds
No-till farming appears to hold promise for boosting crop yields only in dry regions, not in the cool, moist areas of the world, this study found.

Mother's gestational diabetes linked to daughters being overweight later
Women who developed gestational diabetes and were overweight before pregnancy were at a higher risk of having daughters who were obese later in childhood, according to new research published today in Diabetes Care.

UT Arlington computer science engineering students win challenge for real-time traffic app
Three University of Texas at Arlington Computer Science and Engineering students have won a $10,000 prize in the NTx Apps Challenge for a smart traffic light network that adjusts traffic light schedules to make traffic flow more efficient.

Evidence says: December symposium showcases forensics at NIST
To spotlight how the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) currently serves the forensics community, the agency is hosting Forensics@NIST 2014 on Dec.

Pre-enlistment mental disorders and suicidality among new US Army soldiers
Two new reports show that new soldiers and civilians do not differ in their probability of having at least one lifetime mental disorder but that some mental disorders are more common among new soldiers than civilians.

Time for change -- additional daylight saving could improve public health
New research published just before the end of UK daylight saving shows that proposals to permanently increase the hours of waking daylight could have real impacts on public health.

A gut bacterium that attacks dengue and malaria pathogens and their mosquito vectors
Just like those of humans, insect guts are full of microbes, and the microbiota can influence the insect's ability to transmit diseases.

Researcher looks to technology to improve the care of patients with pancreatic cysts
The American Gastroenterological Association Research Foundation is pleased to announce that Richard S.

Were clinical trial practices in East Germany questionable?
Clinical trials carried out in the former East Germany in the second half of the 20th century were not always with the full knowledge or understanding of participants with some questionable practices taking place, according to a paper published online in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

Treating ill health might not be enough to help homeless people get off the streets
Health care providers should recognize that any effective strategy to address homelessness needs to include both interventions to improve the health of homeless individuals as well as larger-scale policy changes, according to a paper published today.

Overweight kids misinterpret asthma symptoms, potentially overuse medication
New research shows obese children with asthma may mistake symptoms of breathlessness for loss of asthma control leading to high and unnecessary use of rescue medications.

UC San Diego named stem cell 'alpha clinic'
In a push to further speed clinical development of emerging stem cell therapies, Sanford Stem Cell Clinical Center at UC San Diego Health System was named today one of three new 'alpha clinics' by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the state's stem cell agency.

NASA's Terra satellite shows a more organized Tropical Storm Ana
The strong southwesterly wind shear that has been battering Tropical Storm Ana has abated and has given the storm a chance to re-organize.

World population likely to peak by 2070
New population projections from IIASA researchers provide a fundamentally improved view of future population, structured by age, sex, and level of education, which differ from recent projections by the United Nations.

Precise and programmable biological circuits
A team led by ETH professor Yaakov Benenson has developed several new components for biological circuits.

NIH awards Detroit colleges $21.2 million to improve student diversity in biomed research
A consortium of Marygrove College, University of Detroit Mercy, Wayne County Community College District and Wayne State University has been awarded $21.2 million over five years by the National Institutes of Health to implement a program encouraging more undergraduate students from underrepresented and economically disadvantaged backgrounds to pursue careers in biomedical research.

Paper-based synthetic gene networks could enable rapid detection of ebola and other viruses
Synthetic gene networks hold great potential for broad biotechnology and medical applications, but so far they have been limited to the lab.

Highest altitude ice age human occupation documented in Peruvian Andes
In the southern Peruvian Andes, an archaeological team led by researchers at the University of Maine has documented the highest altitude ice age human occupation anywhere in the world -- nearly 4,500 meters above sea level.

Thyroid cancer genome analysis finds markers of aggressive tumors
A new comprehensive analysis of thyroid cancer from the Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network has identified markers of aggressive tumors, which could allow for better targeting of appropriate treatments to individual patients.

Flu at the zoo and other disasters: Experts help animal exhibitors prepare for the worst
Here are three disaster scenarios for zoo or aquarium managers: one, a wildfire lunges towards your facility, threatening your staff and hundreds of zoo animals.

UTSA Society for Advancement of Hispanics/Chicanos & Native Americans in Science Student Chapter honored with Outstanding Mentoring Award at SACNAS National Conference
The University of Texas at San Antonio Student Chapter of the Society for Advancement of Hispanics/Chicanos & Native Americans in Science was recently honored with the Outstanding Mentoring Award at the Society for Advancement of Hispanics/Chicanos & Native Americans in Science 2014 National Conference in Los Angeles.

NYU researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber
Researchers have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology.

Population Council presents New research at HIV Research for Prevention
The Population Council will present new research on novel approaches to HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancy prevention at the HIV Research for Prevention Conference, HIV R4P, in Cape Town, South Africa.

An over-the-scope clipping device for endoscopic management of gastrointestinal defects is safe and effective
A new study reports that over-the-scope clip placement is a safe and effective therapy for the closure of gastrointestinal defects such as anastomotic leaks, fistulae and perforations.

New test could identify infants with rare insulin disease
A rare form of a devastating disease which causes low blood sugar levels in babies and infants may now be recognised earlier thanks to a new test developed by researchers from The University of Manchester.

How safe is 'safe' when using the Internet as a communication channel?
With information transfers taking place more commonly on the Internet nowadays, via email or electronic payment systems like PayPal, the integrity of the internet as a secure means for communication has become an obsession that is very real to both end-users, and the programmers behind the digital technology.

Flu viruses disguised as waste
Disguising itself as waste, the shell of the flu virus is torn apart by the cell's own disposal system, thereby releasing viral genetic information.

Useful markers to predict response to chemotherapy in patients with liver cancer
A study led by the researcher at the Institute of Biomedical Research, Isabel Fabregat, could serve to select patients with hepatocellular carcinoma unresponsive to most frequently used drug in liver cancer: sorafenib.

Waste, an alternative source of energy to petroleum
The group led by Martín Olazar, researcher in the UPV/EHU's Department of Chemical Engineering, is studying the development of sustainable refineries where it is possible to produce fuels and raw materials providing an alternative to petroleum by using biomass and other waste materials like plastics, tires, etc.

'Breath test' shows promise for diagnosing fungal pneumonia
Many different microbes can cause pneumonia, and treatment may be delayed or off target if doctors cannot tell which bug is the culprit.

Cancer exosome 'micro factories' aid in cancer progression
Exosomes, tiny, virus-sized particles released by cancer cells, can bioengineer micro-RNA molecules resulting in tumor growth.

TCGA study improves understanding of genetic drivers of thyroid cancer
An analysis of the genomes of nearly 500 papillary thyroid carcinomas -- the most common form of thyroid cancer -- provided new insights into the roles of frequently mutated cancer genes and other alterations driving disease development.

Dispositional mindfulness associated with better cardiovascular health
A new study that measured 'dispositional mindfulness' along with seven indicators of cardiovascular health found that persons reporting higher degrees of awareness of their present feelings and experiences had better health.

Roman-Britons had less gum disease than modern Britons
The Roman-British population from c. 200-400 AD appears to have had far less gum disease than we have today, according to a study of skulls at the Natural History Museum led by a King's College London periodontist.

Cutting the ties that bind
The development of a new organism from the joining of two single cells is a carefully orchestrated endeavor.

University of Houston research offers hope for water-starved West
With more than more than 2.7 billion acre-feet of brackish groundwater, even West Texas isn't technically bone dry.

Genetic causes underlying the disqualification of 2 elite American Standardbred pacers
A DNA mutation that can lead to horses being genetically male, but female in appearance, may explain at least two cases of controversial sexual identity, according to research led by professors from the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences and published in PLOS Genetics.

Genomic data support early contact between Easter Island and Americas
People may have been making their way from Easter Island to the Americas well before Dutch commander Jakob Roggeveen arrived in 1722, according to new genomic evidence showing that the Rapanui people living on that most isolated of islands had significant contact with Native American populations hundreds of years earlier.

Added benefit of vedolizumab is not proven
In its dossier, the drug manufacturer presented no suitable data for the therapeutic indication Crohn's disease or for ulcerative colitis.

Helping sweet cherries survive the long haul
Research into the effectiveness of hydrocooling of sweet cherries at commercial packing houses determined the need for post-packing cooling.

Fires in the southern United States
In this image taken by the Aqua satellite of the southern United States actively burning areas as detected by MODIS's thermal bands are outlined in red.

Chamber of secrets
Cells can huddle to communicate within a restricted group, scientists at EMBL Heidelberg have found.

'Swingers' multiple drug use heightens risk of sexually transmitted diseases
People who engage in heterosexual group sex and partner swapping are increasing their risk of catching sexually transmitted diseases if they engage in multiple drug use, says a study published online in the journal Sexually Transmitted Infections.

Novel software application can stratify early-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients
Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield, is a novel software tool developed at Mayo Clinic that can automatically quantitate adenocarcinoma pulmonary nodule characteristics from non-invasive high resolution computed tomography images and stratify non-small cell lung cancer patients into risk groups that have significantly different disease-free survival outcome.

InSilico Medicine announces collaboration -- Canada Cancer and Aging Research Laboratories
Insilico Medicine will fund CCARL's pilot research study in personalized medicine and aging research.

Intelligent materials that work in space
ARQUIMEA, a company that began in the Business Incubator in the Science Park of the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, will be testing technology it has developed in the International Space Station.

New, faster therapeutic hypothermia techniques
Rapid lowering of body temperature following an acute myocardial infarction can be an effective therapeutic strategy to minimize damage to the heart muscle caused by the loss and restoration of blood flow to the heart.

People who develop kidney stones may face increased bone fracture risk
People who developed kidney or urinary tract stones were more likely to later experience bone fractures.

Changes at the grocery store could turn the burden of shopping with children on its head
Avoiding power struggles in the grocery store with children begging for sweets, chips and other junk foods -- and parents often giving in -- could be helped by placing the healthier options at the eye level of children and moving the unhealthy ones out of the way.

Superstring theorist at University of Florida wins 2015 Heineman Prize
The American Physical Society and the American Institute of Physics announced today that theoretical physicist Pierre Ramond, director of the Institute for Fundamental Theory at the University of Florida, has won the 2015 Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics -- one of the highest honors for scientific investigators in that field.

Distant planets provide a glimpse of the future of Earth's oceans
The impact of climate change and over-exploitation on oceans is explored in new book by Leicester geologists.

The Lancet: The hidden truth about the health of homeless people
As many as 4 million Europeans and 3.5 million Americans experience homelessness every year, and the numbers are rising.

Study: Some online shoppers pay more than others
A new study co-authored by a team of Northeastern University faculty and students has found numerous instances of price steering and discrimination on many popular e-commerce retail and travel websites.

Wayne State researcher finds key signaling pathway in cause of preeclampsia
A team of researchers led by a Wayne State University School of Medicine associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology has published findings that provide novel insight into the cause of preeclampsia, the leading cause of maternal and infant death worldwide, a discovery that could lead to the development of new therapeutic treatments.

New microscope collects dynamic images of the molecules that animate life
A new microscopy technology collects high-resolution images rapidly and minimizes damage to cells, meaning it can image the 3-D activity of molecules, cells, and embryos in fine detail over longer periods than was previously possible.

European multicenter harmonization study shows anaplastic lymphoma kinase immunohistochemistry testing comparable to, if not better than, fluorescence in situ hybridization testing
Sixteen institutions across Europe collaborated together to show for the first time that a semi-quantitative anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein expression test, immunohistochemistry, is reliable amongst several laboratories and reviewers when test methodology and result interpretation are strictly standardized and the scoring pathologists are appropriately trained on the test.

New insight on why people with Down syndrome invariably develop Alzheimer's disease
Researchers discover the cell events in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome that lead to the amyloid pathology observed in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

Study finds significant increase in type 1 diabetes rates among non-Hispanic white youth
The rate of non-Hispanic white youth diagnosed with type 1 diabetes increased significantly from 2002 to 2009 in all but the youngest age group of children, according to a new study published today in the journal Diabetes.

Bristol team creates designer 'barrel' proteins
Designer proteins that expand on nature's own repertoire, created by a team of chemists and biochemists from the University of Bristol, UK, are described in a paper published this week in Science.

Teens whose parents exert more psychological control have trouble with closeness, independence
A new longitudinal study has found that teens whose parents exerted psychological control over them at age 13 had problems establishing healthy friendships and romantic relationships both in adolescence and into adulthood.

New experiment provides route to macroscopic high-mass superpositions
University of Southampton scientists have designed a new experiment to test the foundations of quantum mechanics at the large scale.

Florida lizards evolve rapidly, within 15 years and 20 generations
Scientists working on islands in Florida have documented the rapid evolution of a native lizard species -- in as little as 15 years -- as a result of pressure from an invading lizard species, introduced from Cuba.

Department of Environmental Quality awards $1.6 million grant to continue water cleanup
For the past decade, professor Robert Nairn and his team of students at the University of Oklahoma College of Engineering have worked to begin cleaning mineral contamination from the waters at the Tar Creek Superfund site.

Gene identified for immune system reset after infection
Duke University researchers have uncovered the genes that are normally activated during recovery from bacterial infection.

New TSRI studies bring scientists closer to combating dangerous unstable proteins
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute have discovered a way to decrease deadly protein deposits in the heart, kidney and other organs associated with a group of human diseases called the systemic amyloid diseases.

New policymaking tool for shift to renewable energy
Multiple pathways exist to a low greenhouse gas future, all involving increased efficiency and a dramatic shift in energy supply away from fossil fuels.

Cornell chemists show ALS is a protein aggregation disease
Using a technique that illuminates subtle changes in individual proteins, chemistry researchers at Cornell University have uncovered new insight into the underlying causes of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

Boston College professor to lead $19 million NIH mentoring network
Boston College Biologist David Burgess and other leaders in the field will develop the National Research Mentoring Network through a five-year, $19 million grant from the NIH to increase diversity within the ranks of the nation's biomedical workforce.

To wilt or not to wilt
Plant breeders have long identified and cultivated disease-resistant varieties. A research team at the University of California, Riverside has now revealed a new molecular mechanism for resistance and susceptibility to a common fungus that causes wilt in susceptible tomato plants.

NASA HS3 mission Global Hawk's bullseye in Hurricane Edouard
NASA's Hurricane Severe Storms Sentinel or HS3 mission flew the unmanned Global Hawk aircraft on two missions between Sept.

Shorter TB treatment not a successful alternative
A clinical drug trial conducted in five Sub-Sahara African countries shows that a shortened (four month) treatment for tuberculosis is well tolerated and may work well in subsets of TB patients, but overall could not be considered as an alternative to the current six month standard treatment.

Experimental breast cancer drug holds promise in combination therapy for Ewing sarcoma
Ewing sarcoma tumors disappeared and did not return in more than 70 percent of mice treated with combination therapy that included drugs from a family of experimental agents developed to fight breast cancer, reported St.

Polymer hybrid thin-film composites for food packaging and membrane filters
Juha Nikkola, Senior Scientist at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, developed new hybrid materials in his doctoral research project for use in the manufacture and modification of thin-film composites.

Birds roosting in large groups less likely to contract West Nile virus
A University of Illinois study found that when large groups of birds roost together the chances that an individual bird will get bitten by mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus and subsequently contract the disease actually go down.

Berkeley Lab study reveals molecular structure of water at gold electrodes
Berkeley Lab researchers have recorded the first observations of the molecular structure of liquid water at a gold electrode under different battery charging conditions.

Screening questions fail to identify teens at risk for hearing loss
Subjective screening questions do not reliably identify teenagers who are at risk for hearing loss, according to researchers at Penn State College of Medicine.

Scientists uncover how protein ensures reproductive success
An international team of researchers from Japan and the UK has discovered how a single protein, called PP4, oversees the processing of DNA during sperm and egg generation for successful fertilization.

Paperwork consumes one-sixth of US physicians' time and erodes morale: Study
The average US doctor spends 16.6 percent of his or her working hours on non-patient-related paperwork, time that might otherwise be spent caring for patients, according to an analysis of a nationally representative survey of physicians.

RF heating of magnetic nanoparticles improves the thawing of cryopreserved biomaterials
Successful techniques for cryopreserving bulk biomaterials and organ systems would transform current approaches to transplantation and regenerative medicine.

ASU grant aims to transform global energy landscape
Changing the way the nation generates and consumes energy is at the heart of a multimillion dollar grant awarded to Arizona State University from the Department of Energy.

Lucky star escapes black hole with minor damage
Astronomers have gotten the closest look yet at what happens when a black hole takes a bite out of a star -- and the star lives to tell the tale.

Highest altitude archaeological sites in the world explored in the Peruvian Andes
Research conducted at the highest-altitude Pleistocene archaeological sites yet identified in the world sheds new light on the capacity of humans to survive in extreme environments.

Children in high-quality early childhood education are buffered from changes in family income
A new Norwegian study shows that while losses in family income ought to predict increases in behavior problems for many children, attending high-quality early childhood centers offered protection against economic decline.

UT Southwestern scientists discover new clues to how weight loss is regulated
A hormone seen as a popular target to develop weight-loss drugs works by directly targeting the brain and triggering previously unknown activity in the nervous system, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center obesity researchers have found.

University researchers to test whether Ebola survivors' blood can provide new treatment
The University of Liverpool is part of an international research team that will assess whether the blood or plasma of Ebola survivors can be used to treat Ebola patients in West Africa.

Sunshine may slow weight gain and diabetes onset, study suggests
Exposure to moderate amounts of sunshine may slow the development of obesity and diabetes, a study in mice suggests.

62 percent of colorectal cancer patients report financial burden from treatment, study finds
Nearly two-thirds of patients treated for colorectal cancer reported some measure of financial burden due to their treatment, according to a new study.

Progression of age-related macular degeneration in one eye then fellow eye
Having age-related macular degeneration in one eye was associated with an increased incidence of age-related macular degeneration and accelerated progression of the debilitating disease in the other eye.

TSRI chemists achieve new technique with profound implications for drug development
A team from The Scripps Research Institute has established a new carbon-hydrogen activation technique that opens the door to creating a broader range of pure molecules of one-handedness or 'chirality' by eliminating previous starting material limitations.

California's tobacco control efforts losing steam, finds UCSF report
California's position as a leader in tobacco control is under threat, according to a new report from the UC San Francisco Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education.

Springer partners with Beijing Jiaotong University
Springer and Beijing Jiaotong University (BJTU) have signed an agreement to jointly publish books, journals and digital databases covering the BJTU's strongest research disciplines.

Bodies at sea: Ocean oxygen levels may impact scavenger response
An ocean's oxygen levels may play a role in the impact of marine predators on bodies when they are immersed in the sea, according to Simon Fraser University researchers, who deployed a trio of pig carcasses into Saanich Inlet off Vancouver Island and studied them using an underwater camera via the internet.

Without swift influx of substantial aid, Ebola epidemic in Africa poised to explode
The Ebola virus disease epidemic already devastating swaths of West Africa will likely get far worse in the coming weeks and months unless international commitments are significantly and immediately increased, new research led by Yale researchers predicts.

Gene that once aided survival in the Arctic found to have negative impact on health today
In individuals living in the Arctic, researchers have discovered a genetic variant that arose thousands of years ago and likely provided an evolutionary advantage for processing high-fat diets or for surviving in a cold environment; however, the variant also seems to increase the risk of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, and infant mortality in today's northern populations.

Rare diseases: No reason for lower demands for studies
High-quality randomized controlled trials are also meaningful and feasible in rare diseases.

Two days later: Adolescents' conflicts with family spill over to school, vice versa
Family conflict and problems at school tend to occur together on the same day.

Babies' interest in faces linked to callous and unemotional traits
Scientists at the University of Manchester, King's College London and the University of Liverpool have found that an infant's preference for a person's face, rather than an object, is associated with lower levels of callous and unemotional behaviors in toddlerhood.

Top marine scientists call for action on 'invisible' fisheries
To protect our oceans from irreversible harm, governments, conservationists, and researchers around the world must address the enormous threat posed by unregulated and destructive fisheries, say top marine scientists.

Synthetic biology on ordinary paper, results off the page
Two breakthroughs clenched by Wyss scientists, paper-based synthetic gene networks and toehold switch gene regulators, could each have revolutionary impacts on synthetic biology: the former brings synthetic biology out of the traditional confinement of a living cell, the latter provides a rational design framework to enable de-novo design of both the parts and the network of gene regulation.

How ferns adapted to one of Earth's newest and most extreme environments
How ferns adapted to the extreme environmental conditions found in the high Andean mountains of South America is the focus of new research by the universities of Bristol and Sheffield, published today in PLOS ONE.

Nation's 'personality' influences its environmental stewardship, shows new study
Countries with higher levels of compassion and openness score better when it comes to environmental sustainability, says research from the University of Toronto.

Beetroot beneficial for athletes and heart failure patients, research finds
Researchers find the nitrate in beetroot targets fast-twitch muscles, increasing the blood flow to muscles that receive less oxygen.

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Study predicts that current international commitments will not contain Ebola outbreak in Montserrado, Liberia
New modeling research, published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal, has found that the number of Ebola treatment center beds and other measures needed to control the epidemic in Montserrado County, Liberia substantially exceeds the total pledged by the international community to date.

Desert streams: Deceptively simple
Volatile rainstorms drive complex landscape changes in deserts, particularly in dryland channels, which are shaped by flash flooding.

Study: Many in US have poor nutrition, with the disabled doing worst
A new study finds that most US adults fail to meet recommended daily levels of 10 key nutrients, and those with disabilities have even worse nutrition than average.

Sea turtles' first days of life: A sprint and a ride towards safety
With new nano-sized acoustic transmitters, scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, the Turtle Foundation and Queen Mary University of London followed the pathways of loggerhead turtle hatchlings.

Retaining forests where raptors nest can help to protect biodiversity
Raptors can affect the distribution of other species and they can also be used to find forests with high biodiversity value.

Dartmouth study measures breast cancer tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy
A Dartmouth study suggests that it may be possible to use Diffuse Optical Spectroscopic Tomographic imaging to predict which patients will best respond to chemotherapy used to shrink breast cancer tumors before surgery.

YEATS protein potential therapeutic target for cancer
Federal Express and UPS are no match for the human body when it comes to distribution.

Intervention program helps prevent high-school dropouts
New research findings from a team of prevention scientists at Arizona State University demonstrates that a family-focused intervention program for middle-school Mexican American children leads to fewer drop-out rates and lower rates of alcohol and illegal drug use.
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