Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 21, 2014
New GSA book on 2011 Virginia earthquake goes online first
'Online First' is a new method of delivery for The Geological Society of America that provides online publication ahead of print for book chapters as the volume is being assembled.

How the hummingbird achieves its aerobatic feats
Although hummingbirds are much larger and stir up the air more violently as they move, the way that they fly is more closely related to flying insects than it is to other birds.

Type 2 diabetes: Added benefit of canagliflozin plus metformin is not proven
As in the first dossier assessment of canagliflozin, the drug manufacturer provided no suitable data for the fixed combination with metformin either.

Can all nations become democracies?
The answer can be found in MaxRange, which is the world's largest data set on all countries' political systems from the 18th century until today.

HHS, APIC, and SHEA present 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award
The US Department of Health and Human Services, the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America today recognized the University of Vermont Medical Center with the 2014 Partnership in Prevention Award for achieving sustainable improvements toward eliminating healthcare-associated infections.

Investigational drug reduces high potassium levels in chronic kidney disease patients
Research published today found that the investigational drug patiromer decreased high potassium levels and maintained normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease.

Study finds that rejecting unsuitable suitors is easier said than done
According to new research from the University of Toronto and Yale University, rejecting unsuitable romantic partners is easy in hypothetical situations, but not so when considering a face-to-face proposition.

Only half of patients take their medications as prescribed
Here is what we know: If people take medications prescribed to them, they usually get better.

A coating that protects against heat and oxidation
Researchers have developed a coating technique that they plan to use to protect turbine engine and waste incinerator components against heat and oxidation.

Immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in brain cancers
New evidence that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work in glioblastoma and brain metastases presented at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Digoxin associated with higher risk of death and hospitalization
Digoxin, a drug commonly used to treat heart conditions, was associated with a 71 percent higher risk of death and a 63 percent higher risk of hospitalization among adults with diagnosed atrial fibrillation and no evidence of heart failure, according to a Kaiser Permanente study that appears in the current online issue of Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology.

Four outstanding early-career journalists from China and India named EurekAlert! Fellows
Four outstanding early-career science journalists from India and China have been named winners of the 2015 EurekAlert!

Research examines an emerging issue: Treatment of transgendered prison populations
The perceptions and treatment of transgendered populations will be examined at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology.

Possibilities for personalized vaccines revealed at ESMO symposium
The possibilities for personalized vaccines in all types of cancer are revealed today at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology 2014 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Next-door leopards: First GPS-collar study reveals how leopards live with people
In the first-ever GPS-based study of leopards in India, led by WCS and partners has delved into the secret lives of these big cats, and recorded their strategies to thrive in human-dominated areas.

Women with serious mental illness less likely to receive cancer screenings
Study finds that women with symptoms of serious mental illness are 40 percent less likely to receive three cancer screenings: mammography, clinical breast exams and PAP smears.

Mental disorders due to permanent stress
Activated through permanent stress, immune cells will have a damaging effect on and cause changes to the brain.

New terahertz device could strengthen security
We are all familiar with the security hassles that accompany air travel.

New model of follow up for breast cancer patients
Public health researchers from the University of Adelaide have evaluated international breast cancer guidelines, finding that there is potential to improve surveillance of breast cancer survivors from both a patient and health system perspective.

In landmark study of cell therapy for heart attack, more cells make a difference
Physicians from 60 sites treated 161 heart attack patients with their own bone marrow cells, selected for their healing potential and then reinjected into the heart, in an effort to improve the heart's recovery.

Developing a noninvasive test for endometriosis
Researchers at UC San Francisco have identified patterns of genetic activity that can be used to diagnose endometriosis and its severity, a finding that may offer millions of women an alternative to surgery through a simple noninvasive procedure.

Trouble with your boss? Own it
Don't get along with your boss? Your job performance may actually improve if the two of you can come to grips with the poor relationship.

North Carolina researchers unveil a new center for evolutionary medicine
Scientists reveal a new center, Triangle Center for Evolutionary Medicine (TriCEM), to foster cross-disciplinary research in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill area.

Researchers study impact of power prosthetic failures on amputees
Powered lower limb prosthetics hold promise for improving the mobility of amputees, but errors in the technology may also cause some users to stumble or fall.

Fiddler on the roof?
The fiddler crab, Uca pugnax, has migrated nearly 50 miles north of its supposed natural range along the US East Coast.

Rare new species of plant: Stachys caroliniana
University of South Carolina professor John Nelson knows you don't have to travel to a remote Amazon rainforest to discover a new species of plant.

Life's extremists may be an untapped source of antibacterial drugs
Life's extremists, a family of microbes called Archaea, may be an untapped source of new antibacterial drugs.

When shareholders exacerbate their own banks' crisis
Banks are increasingly issuing 'CoCo' bonds to boost the levels of equity they hold.

Polyethylene mulch, glazing create optimal conditions for soil solarization
Researchers raised soil temperatures in high tunnels in southern Arizona to determine the efficacy of soil solarization using clear mulch on the soil surface and with tunnel glazing or with no glazing.

New tool displays West Coast ocean acidification data
The NOAA data portal displays real-time ocean acidification data for the open ocean and protected bays.

Study: Doubling saturated fat in the diet does not increase saturated fat in blood
Doubling saturated fat in the diet does not drive up total levels of saturated fat in the blood, according to a controlled diet study.

Not all baseball stars treated equally in TV steroid coverage, says study of network news
Retired baseball stars Barry Bonds, Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro each had Hall of Fame-worthy numbers, each hitting more than 500 home runs.

Vermicompost leachate improves tomato seedling growth
A study assessed growth performance of tomato seedlings treated with vermicompost-leachate (VCL), an organic liquid produced from earthworm-digested material.

Novel regulatory mechanism for cell division found
A protein kinase or enzyme known as PKM2 has proven to control cell division, potentially providing a molecular basis for tumor diagnosis and treatment.

Research shows anti-HIV medicines can cause damage to fetal hearts
Just-published findings in the journal AIDS raise concern about potential long-term harmful impact of 'antiretroviral therapy' on in-utero infants whose mothers are HIV-positive, but who are not infected with HIV themselves.

Obesity-attributable absenteeism among US workers costs the nation more than $8 billion annually
Obesity costs the US $8.65 billion per year as a result of absenteeism in the workplace -- more than 9 percent of all absenteeism costs.

More genetic clues found in a severe food allergy
Scientists have identified four new genes associated with the severe food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE).

George Tsokos, M.D., honored by Lupus Foundation and American College of Rheumatology
Tsokos, Chief of Rheumatology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, is honored for investigations into the origins of lupus which have led to the discovery of new therapeutic targets.

Researchers discover natural resistance gene against spruce budworm
Scientists from Université Laval, the University of British Columbia and the University of Oxford have discovered a natural resistance gene against spruce budworm in the white spruce.

Novel robotic walker invented by NUS researchers helps patients regain natural gait
A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering has invented a novel robotic walker that helps patients carry out therapy sessions to regain their leg movements and natural gait.

Researchers tease out glitches in immune system's self-recognition
In order to distinguish self from other, the immune system processes proteins from inside and outside the body in different ways.

UK rises to 4th most entrepreneurial economy in the world
The UK has become Europe's most entrepreneurial economy and has climbed five places to fourth globally, according to the 2015 edition of the Global Entrepreneurship Index released today.

Self-regulation intervention boosts school readiness of at-risk children, study shows
An intervention that uses music and games to help preschoolers learn self-regulation skills is helping prepare at-risk children for kindergarten, a new study from Oregon State University shows.

Update on new treatments for liver diseases
Cirrhosis and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease are two serious liver conditions with limited pharmacological treatments.

Researchers get $1.25 million to advance carbon storage
Clemson University researchers and their partners at Georgia Institute of Technology, UNAVCO and Grand Resources Inc. received a $1.25 million award from the Department of Energy to develop technology that will significantly improve the ability to monitor and safeguard geologic carbon storage.

For important tumor-suppressing protein, context is key
Berkeley Lab scientists have learned new details about how an important tumor-suppressing protein, called p53, binds to the human genome.

Clipping proteins that package genes may limit abnormal cell growth in tumors
Changes to the structure of the protein histone H3.3 may play a key role in silencing genes that regulate cancer cell growth.

Theater arts research offers insight for designers, builders of robots
UT Arlington Theatre Arts research provides insight into human behavior for scientists, engineers who design and build social robots.
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