Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

March 15, 2015
Switch off the lights for bats
The study, carried out by scientists from the University of Exeter and Bat Conservation Ireland, found that bat activity was generally lower in street-lit areas than in dark locations with similar habitat.

Light pollution shown to affect plant growth and food webs
Artificial night time light from sources such as street lamps affects the growth and flowering of plants and even the number of insects that depend on those plants for food, a study published today confirms.

Rare glimpse into how coral procreates could aid future conservation
A rare and threatened Caribbean coral species has for the first time been successfully bred and raised in the lab, according to research published in the open-access journal BMC Ecology.

SAPIEN 3 improves 30-day outcomes for major endpoints
The SAPIEN 3 heart valve demonstrated lower death, stroke and paravalvular leak rates than earlier generation devices in patients at high risk for surgery and showed encouraging results in intermediate-risk patients, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session.

Bendavia does not reduce scarring from angioplasty after heart attack
Patients who received the new drug Bendavia before undergoing angioplasty or receiving a stent to clear blocked arteries after a heart attack showed no significant reduction in scarring as compared to patients given a placebo, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session.

Elderly aortic stenosis patients live longer with minimally invasive valve replacement
Elderly patients once considered too frail or tool sick for aortic valve replacement surgery are living longer, with better quality of life, following a minimally invasive surgery, compared to patients who did not undergo surgery, according a study published in The Lancet today.

Folic acid supplementation among adults with hypertension reduces risk of stroke
In a study that included more than 20,000 adults in China with high blood pressure but without a history of stroke or heart attack, the combined use of the hypertension medication enalapril and folic acid, compared with enalapril alone, significantly reduced the risk of first stroke, according to a study appearing in JAMA.

Police not prepared for death investigations
Police are ill-equipped to investigate non-criminal deaths and face a challenge to avoid re-traumatizing bereaved families as well as emotionally protecting themselves, according to QUT research.

After 1 year, patients on new drug fare better than standard therapy
Patients taking evolocumab -- an investigational therapy previously shown to dramatically lower 'bad' cholesterol -- were half as likely to die, suffer a heart attack or stroke, be hospitalized or need a procedure to open blocked arteries compared with those who received standard care, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session in San Diego.

Novel anti-clotting therapy in halted trial no better than existing agents
A novel therapy that would allow doctors to turn the body's blood-clotting ability off and on in a more controlled way was about as effective as established anticoagulants in patients undergoing angioplasty but was associated with higher rates of moderate to severe bleeding, according to an analysis of data from a terminated Phase III trial presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session.

American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session PM tip sheet for March 15, 2015
Even though most doctors believe diet is important in preventing and managing cardiovascular disease, there are major gaps in their knowledge and, in turn, efforts to educate patients about heart healthy diets may be falling short, according to a recent survey of 236 cardiologists and internal medicine physicians and trainees at a large tertiary academic medical center.

MitraClip valve repair continues to show benefit in commercial setting
The commercial track record with transcatheter mitral valve repair, approved for patients at high risk for surgery, compares favorably with pre-approval reports, according to findings from a US registry presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session.

SAPIEN valve, surgery equivalent at 5 years
Five-year data suggest that the SAPIEN transcatheter heart valve is a feasible option for patients with severe aortic stenosis deemed to be at high risk for open-heart surgery, though valve leakage was more common with the first-generation valve evaluated in this study than with surgery, according to research from PARTNER I presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session.

Kavli IPMU given a long-term future
Last month, the WPI Program Committee examined five WPI centers carefully, and concluded that all centers had met the goal of the WPI program.

Benefits seen for first-in-field brain shield used with TAVR
An investigational device that deflects debris away from the brain during transcatheter aortic valve replacement seems to improve in-hospital safety outcomes and cognitive scores at discharge, according to preliminary findings from a small randomized study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session.

Yale leads test of new device that protects the brain during heart-valve procedure
In the first multicenter trial of its kind, Yale researchers tested a new device that lowers the risk of stroke and cognitive decline in patients undergoing heart-valve replacement.

Self-expanding TAVR widens advantage over surgery at 2 years
Two-year data show a continued survival advantage for self-expanding transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) over standard surgery in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session.

CT scans appear to dramatically improve diagnosis of heart disease
Use of computed tomography coronary angiography, which provides 3-D images of the heart, coupled with standard care allows doctors to more accurately diagnose coronary artery disease in patients presenting with chest pain, therefore, leading to more appropriate follow-up testing and treatments, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 64th Annual Scientific Session.
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