Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

April 26, 2015
Could smell hold the key to ending pesticide use?
UK scientists may have uncovered a natural way of avoiding the use of pesticides and help save plants from attack by recreating a natural insect repellent.

Parents sound off on mobile device use by children
Smartphones and tablets have become part of everyday life, but parents still worry that mobile devices may not be the best thing for their children, according to a study to be presented Sunday, April 26, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.

Researchers harness the power of mobile devices to teach kids about safety
Researchers will present the results of a study looking at the effectiveness of the app on Sunday, April 26, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.

Just an hour of TV a day linked to unhealthy weight in kindergartners
Kindergartners and first-graders who watched as little as one hour of television a day were more likely to be overweight or obese compared to children who watched TV for less than 60 minutes each day, according to a study to be presented Sunday, April 26 at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) annual meeting in San Diego.

Despite warnings, health food stores recommend OTC dietary supplements to minors
Fifteen year olds are not only able to buy over-the-counter dietary supplements from a sampling of health food stores across the country, the staff at those stores actually went so far as to recommend certain products, despite labels reading 'for adult use only.'

We are family: Adult support reduces youths' risk of violence exposure
Adults can have a bigger influence on youths growing up in poor, violent neighborhoods than they may realize, according to a study to be presented Sunday, April 26 at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.

Some children lose autism diagnosis but still struggle
About one in 14 toddlers diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder no longer met the diagnostic criteria in elementary school, but most continued to have emotional/behavior symptoms and required special education supports, according to a study to be presented Sunday, April 26, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.

Permanent radiotherapy implants reduce risk of prostate cancer recurrence after 5 years
Results from a randomized controlled trial to compare the use of permanent radioactive implants (brachytherapy) with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer show that the men who received brachytherapy were twice as likely to be cancer-free five years later.

Upside down and inside out
Researchers have captured the first 3-D video of a living algal embryo turning itself inside out, from a sphere to a mushroom shape and back again.

Persistent swollen neck glands could indicate cancer
New research led by the University of Exeter Medical School, published today in the British Journal of General Practice, has concluded that persistent enlarged lymph glands, found in the neck, should be referred for further investigation when detected in clinic.

NTU Singapore and Berkeley Lab to jointly develop energy efficiency solutions
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will jointly develop technological solutions for energy efficiency and sustainable development in the tropics.

Inaccurate reporting jeopardizing clinical trials
Researchers at The University of Manchester say better method reporting in animal experiments could save hundreds of thousands of pounds and stop clinical trials being commissioned that have no hope of a successful result.

Program puts a dent in summer hunger
Results of a study evaluating the impact of the summer feeding program will be presented on Sunday, April 26, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.

Electronic cigarettes gaining in popularity among teens
Teens no longer smoke just cigarettes. They have branched out to using alternative tobacco products such as electronic cigarettes, hookahs and little cigars.

The Lancet: Two-thirds of the world's population have no access to safe and affordable surgery
Millions of people are dying from common, easily treatable conditions like appendicitis, fractures, or obstructed labor because they do not have access to, or can't afford, proper surgical care, according to a major new Commission, published in The Lancet.

7 great achievements in child health research celebrated at Pediatric Academic Societies
Pediatric research discoveries over the past 40 years have led to prevention and treatment strategies that have saved millions of lives worldwide.

Proton radiotherapy delivers more accurate cancer treatment, with less collateral damage
Radiotherapy using protons can deliver more accurate treatment to a tumour while reducing the dose to surrounding tissue.

Serving healthy foods with a smile may entice students to eat better
Labeling healthy foods with smiley faces and offering small prizes for buying nutritious items may be a low-cost way to get students to make healthy choices in the school lunch line, according to a study to be presented Sunday, April 26, at the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting in San Diego.

JCU doctors in world-first epilepsy treatment
Researchers will test the effectiveness of the drug Levetiracetam on children who arrive at the hospitals' emergency departments suffering from Convulsive Status Epilepticus.

Common back problems may be caused by evolution of human locomotion
A common spinal disease could be the result of some people's vertebrae, the bones that make up the spine, sharing similarities in shape to a non-human primate.
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.