Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

August 30, 2015
Scientists uncover the antigenic patterns of the recent influenza A (H3N2) virus
The human influenza A (H3N2) virus was widespread in many countries in the 2014-2015 winter season, causing more morbidity and mortality.

Research shows testosterone changes brain structures in female-to-male transsexuals
Brain imaging shows that testosterone therapy given as part of sex reassignment changes the brain structures and the pathway associated with speech and verbal fluency.

Peri-infarct pacing does not improve outcomes in patients with large myocardial infarction
In patients with a large myocardical infarction, pacing, with the left ventricular lead placed in the area of the lesion (peri-infarct) did not prevent further enlargement of the heart (remodeling), nor did it improve functional or clinical outcomes after 18 months, according to results of the Pacing Remodeling Prevention Therapy trial trial.

Study shows that food may be addictive
An international group of researchers have found that food craving activates different brain networks between obese and normal weight patients.

Young adults living in polluted city show early signs of cardiovascular risk
Young adults living in a polluted city show early signs of cardiovascular risk, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr.

Bystander CPR linked to lower nursing home admission and brain damage after cardiac arrest
Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been linked to a 30 percent lower risk of nursing home admission and brain damage in survivors of cardiac arrest outside hospital in research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr.

Adenosine triphosphate does not improve efficacy of pulmonary vein isolation
Late recurrence of atrial fibrillation is not reduced in patients whose pulmonary vein isolation treatment incorporates the addition of adenosine triphosphate, according to results of the UNDER-ATP trial.

Recruitment of leukocytes is a hallmark of stent thrombosis
Recruitment of leukocytes is a hallmark of stent thrombosis, according to results from the PRESTIGE study presented today at ESC Congress and published in European Heart Journal.

Ezetimibe provides particular benefit in patients with diabetes and recent acute coronary syndrome
According to the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 800,000 Americans die each year from heart disease and stroke.

Patient education does not impact apixaban adherence
Adherence to the oral anticoagulant apixaban among patients with atrial fibrillation was no better for those who received an educational program compared to those who did not, results of the international, randomised AEGEAN trial show.

Ezetimibe reduces cardiovascular events in diabetics with recent acute coronary syndrome
Ezetimibe reduces cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes and a recent acute coronary syndrome, according to a subgroup analysis of the IMPROVE-IT trial presented at ESC Congress today by co-principal investigator Dr Robert Giugliano, physician in cardiovascular medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, US.1 Ezetimibe achieved greater reductions in LDL cholesterol than statins alone, resulting in lower risks of cardiovascular events in patients with diabetes.

Better outcomes achieved with ESC guideline adherent antithrombotic management
Patients with atrial fibrillation who receive antithrombotic management according to ESC guidelines have better outcomes than those who do not, according to one year follow up results from the ESC's EORP-AF Pilot General Registry presented today at ESC Congress 2015 and published online in Europace.

Psychotic patients distinguished from controls while watching movie 'Alice in Wonderland'
Researchers using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) have found that even first-episode psychotic patients process information differently from a control group.

Treating left atrial appendage could dampen long standing persistent AF
In patients with long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation despite standard treatment, additional electrical isolation of an area called the left atrial appendage can improve freedom from AF without increasing complications, results of the BELIEF study show.

Efforts to improve AED usage increase bystander defibrillation in public but not at home
Efforts to improve automated external defibrillator (AED) usage increase bystander defibrillation in public places but not at home, reveals a study of more than 25 000 cardiac arrest patients presented at ESC Congress today by Dr.

Better daily sea ice forecasts for the Arctic following CU-Boulder-led innovation
Ice experts from the University of Colorado Boulder, the US Navy, the US National Ice Center and other institutions have developed a straightforward new technique for estimating sea ice concentration in the Arctic Ocean, and the new method improves the US Navy's short-term sea ice forecast of ice edge location by almost 40 percent.

Rapid, more sensitive test speeds up chest pain triage
Patients arriving at the emergency department with chest pain suggestive of acute myocardial infarction can be triaged more quickly and more safely using a new rapid assay with refined cut-offs, German research suggests.

CPR for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest should be conducted for at least 35 minutes
Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest should be conducted for at least 35 minutes, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr.

Clinical trial: First treatment for 'emotional flatness' associated with schizophrenia
Results of a clinical trial seem to show the first effective treatment for the negative symptoms -- withdrawal, lack of emotion, and apathy -- associated with schizophrenia.

Gene regulating severity of tissue damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis identified
Scientists have identified a new protein (C5orf30) which regulates the severity of tissue damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation, pain, stiffness and damage to the joints of the feet, hips, knees, and hands.

Gene regulating severity of tissue damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis identified
Scientists have identified a new protein (C5orf30) which regulates the severity of tissue damage caused by rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation, pain, stiffness and damage to the joints of the feet, hips, knees, and hands.

Air pollution associated with increased heart attack risk despite 'safe' levels
Particulate matter and NO2 air pollution are associated with increased risk of severe heart attacks despite being within European recommended levels, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr.

Cyclosporine does not improve outcomes after PCI
The immunosuppressant drug cyclosporine did not improve clinical outcomes compared to placebo in patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention for the more severe form of heart attack known as ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

Antiarrhythmia drugs no impact on late AF recurrence
In patients with atrial fibrillation treated with radiofrequency catheter ablation, the addition of antiarrhythmic drugs for 90 days after the procedure did not reduce arrhythmia recurrence rates at one year, according to results of the Efficacy of Antiarrhythmic Drugs Short-Term Use after Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation trial.

Cold weather linked to increased stroke risk in atrial fibrillation patients
Cold weather is associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr.

Cold weather associated with higher risk of severe heart attack
Cold weather is associated with a higher risk of severe heart attack, according to research presented at ESC Congress today by Dr.

Antimineralocorticoids offer no benefit in heart attack patients without heart failure
Heart attack patients without heart failure derive no benefit from the addition of mineralocortoid receptor antagonists, to standard therapy, results of the ALBATROSS study show.

Leadless pacemaker study assesses safety and efficacy
A leadless cardiac pacemaker showed 'good safety and reliable function' during the initial six months of follow-up in the LEADLESS II study, investigators reported during a Hot Line presentation at the ESC congress 2015.

Surprise cardiac finding predicts future risk
In patients with chronic ischemic heart disease, a small left ventricle with thick walls, is the strongest predictor of morphologic remodelling, which is generally considered a first step towards heart failure, according to unexpected findings presented today at ESC Congress 2015.

Multiple risk factors cancel impact of atrial fibrillation on ischemic stroke risk
The impact of atrial fibrillation on ischemic stroke risk in elderly patients is eliminated with multiple risk factors, according to an 11-year study in more than 425,000 patients presented at ESC Congress today.
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