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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | January 31, 2016


English towns with a Jewish heritage more tolerant of modern-day immigration
Modern-day tolerance towards immigrants is significantly higher in English towns that welcomed medieval Jews, according to new research into persistent regional variations in attitudes to immigration.
Australian cancer drug licensed in $730M deal
A promising new cancer drug, developed in Australia by the Cancer Therapeutics CRC (CTx), has been licensed to US pharmaceutical company Merck in a deal worth $730 million.
The brains of patients with schizophrenia vary depending on the type of schizophrenia
Scientists prove that the brains of patients with schizophrenia vary depending on the type of schizophrenia.
Research explores communication in human interaction
A major new €3.5 million research initiative led by the University of East Anglia will aim to improve understanding of a fundamental part of communication in humans.
Do asthma and COPD truly exist?
Defining a patient's symptoms using the historical diagnostic labels of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an outdated approach to understanding an individual's condition, according to experts writing in the European Respiratory Journal today.

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