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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 25, 2016


DOW Chemical, EPA to participate in PETA Science Consortium Webinar Series on inhalation toxicity
A seminar series starting Tuesday will address current practices for acute inhalation toxicity testing and examine the development and implementation of alternative approaches to reduce and replace acute inhalation testing in mammals for both global regulatory agencies and non-regulatory purposes.
Chinese researchers develop new battery technology
A Chinese research team from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed a novel, environmentally friendly low-cost battery that overcomes many of the problems of lithium ion batteries (LIB).
Phone-based laser rangefinder works outdoors
At the International Conference on Robotics and Automation in May, researchers from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) will present a new infrared depth-sensing system, built from a smartphone with a $10 laser attached to it, that works outdoors as well as in.
Study shows that Wnt secretion preventing drugs may reduce renal fibrosis
Renal fibrosis or the scarring of kidneys, following an injury, reduces their function and can cause kidney disease to progressively worsen.
Botulism in waterbirds: Mortality rates and new insights into how it spreads
Outbreaks of botulism killed large percentages of waterbirds inhabiting a wetland in Spain.
Special topic: New unconventional superconductors and Weyl semimetal
In the 2016(5) issue, Science China Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy published a special topic on new unconventional superconductors and Weyl semimetal.
Study finds brain's response to social exclusion is different in young marijuana users
A study from Massachusetts General Hospital researchers finds that the brains of young adult marijuana users react differently to social exclusion than do those of non-users.
New insights into human tears could lead to more comfortable contact lenses
Chemical engineers at Stanford have discovered mechanical properties of the tear film on the eye's surface that can be used to manufacture contact lenses that more closely mimic the eye.
Cells in standby mode
During unfavorable conditions, the cytoplasm can solidify and protect the cell from death.
Parents think life quality is worse for teens and adults born very premature
Parents of very premature babies are more worried about their grown up children's lives than mothers and fathers whose babies were born full term.
Ancient bones point to shifting grassland species as climate changes
More rainfall during the growing season may have led to one of the most significant changes in the Earth's vegetation in the distant past, and similar climate changes could affect the distribution of plants in the future as well, a new study suggests.
One atom can make a difference: Hydrogen-bonding pairing helps design better drugs to neutralize gut
Hydrogen-bonding pairing regulates protein-ligand affinity; helps improve drug design.
CRI researchers link absence of protein to liver tissue regeneration
Scientists at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern report that inactivating a certain protein-coding gene promotes liver tissue regeneration in mammals.
Antarctic birds recognize individual humans
Brown skuas in Antarctica can discriminate individual people, even though they normally do not see many people around.
$10 million pledge creates National Behavioral Health Innovation Center at CU Anschutz
Colorado's newest center dedicated to improving mental and behavioral health has been established with a $10 million five-year commitment from the Anschutz Foundation, one of the largest program pledges in the history of the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
Scientists call for new strategy to study climate change impacts on coral reefs
An international research team calls for a targeted research strategy to better understand the impact multiple stressors will have on coral reef in the future due to global climate change.
Smaller. Cheaper. Better.
A Sandia-led team has developed a way to make a magnetic material that could lead to lighter and smaller, cheaper and better-performing high-frequency transformers, needed for more flexible energy storage systems and widespread adoption of renewable energy.
Simulation shows how modern interventions can affect tropical forests and indigenous people
A computer simulation shows that carefully designing government interactions with rural indigenous people is critical for protecting the sustainability of people, wildlife and the land.
Micro-sanctuaries key to survival of wildlife in human-dominated landscapes
A new study by a team of researchers from the Centre for Ecological Sciences at the Indian Institute of Science, Manipal University, Centre for Wildlife Studies and the Wildlife Conservation Society-India, says that maintaining even the tiniest wildlife sanctuaries will help preserve some biodiversity in increasingly urbanized landscapes.
The first 3-D atlas of the extinct dodo
For the first time since its extinction, a 3-D atlas of the skeletal anatomy of the dodo has been created, based upon two exceptional dodo skeletons that have remained unstudied for over a century.
Unlocking the gates to quantum computing
Researchers from Griffith University and the University of Queensland have overcome one of the key challenges to quantum computing by simplifying a complex quantum logic operation.
Boost fundraising with something simple: Sandpaper
Researchers have discovered that touching rough surfaces increases awareness of discomfort in our surroundings, which can trigger empathy.
Research team at IUPUI develops social app to support Alzheimer's caregivers
Every day, more than 15 million unpaid caregivers provide care to people with Alzheimer's disease, with little outside support and often at the risk of their own health.
Biologists discover sophisticated 'alarm' signals in honey bees
Bees can use sophisticated signals to warn their nestmates about the level of danger from predators attacking foragers or the nest, according to a new study.
Sniffing out a dangerous vapor
University of Utah engineers have developed a new type of fiber material for a handheld scanner that can detect small traces of alkane fuel vapor, a valuable advancement that could be an early-warning signal for leaks in an oil pipeline, an airliner, or for locating a terrorist's explosive.
Over 300 new beetle records for New Brunswick, Canada, in a special issue of ZooKeys
Beetle diversity in New Brunswick, Canada, has elicited the interest of biologists for over a century and continues to do so.
What's in a name? In some cases, longer life
Black men with historically distinctive black names such as Elijah and Moses lived a year longer, on average, than other black men, according to new research examining 3 million death certificates from 1802 to 1970.
New class of molecular 'lightbulbs' illuminate MRI
Duke scientists have discovered a new class of molecular tags that enhance MRI signals by 10,000-fold and generate detectable signals that last over an hour.

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