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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 26, 2016


Computer simulation discloses new effect of cavitation
Researchers have discovered a so far unknown formation mechanism of cavitation bubbles by means of a model calculation.
High-throughput screen identifies potential henipavirus drug target
The henipaviruses are deadly cousins of the more common mumps, measles, and respiratory syncytial viruses.
No need to try, try, try again
Placement of a single, coated, self-expanding metallic stent (cSEMS) achieved similar rates of resolution of benign pancreatobiliary strictures as placement of multiple plastic stents, the current standard of care, and required fewer sessions of endoscopic retrograde cholang-iopancreatography, according to the results of a randomized controlled trial led by an endoscopist at the Medical University of South Carolina and reported in the March 22, 2016, Journal of the American Medical Association.

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