Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

April 30, 2016
Fireworks-related burns requiring hospital stays skyrocket among kids
As states relaxed laws related to fireworks sales during the past decade, emergency doctors saw an increase in both the number of fireworks related injuries among children and the severity of those injuries, according to new research being presented at the Pediatrics Academic Societies 2016 Meeting.

Inadequate financial savings tied to increased childhood health risks
The connection between a family's income and childhood health has been well-established, with lower income linked to poorer health and a greater likelihood of more chronic conditions.

Children are diagnosed with autism at younger ages since push for universal screening
Researchers say children with autism who were born before the 2007 recommendation by the American Academy of Pediatrics that all children be screened for the disorder at the 18- and 24-month well child visits were diagnosed significantly later than they are today.

Combination of face-to-face and online bullying may pack a powerful punch
Bullying and taunts that may have once stayed in the schoolyard increasingly spill over into text messages and social media.

Study shows asthma-related Twitter posts can predict rise in hospital visits
New research at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2016 Meeting suggests that to predict -- and possibly prevent -- severe asthma attacks in a community, physicians can look for clues in social media.

Inadequate cushion of savings tied to increased child health risks
Studies already show that family income affects a child's health.

Survey suggests children of gay fathers are well adjusted
Compared to a national sample of heterosexual parents, gay fathers report similar parenting behavior and measures of wellbeing in their children, according to new research to be presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2016 Meeting.

Mental health diagnoses rise significantly for military children
Mirroring national estimates, a new study that will be presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2016 Meeting found the percentage of children enrolled in the US Military Healthcare System diagnosed with and treated for mental health disorders increased significantly during the past 15 years.

Study identifies factors that can help children thrive in the face of adversity
Research shows that people who experience four or more adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), such as economic hardship, exposure to violence or the death of a loved one, are more likely to have lasting physical and mental health problems.

Breast milk linked to significant early brain growth in preemies
Feeding premature babies mostly breast milk during the first month of life appears to spur more robust brain growth.

Study finds adolescent tobacco users commonly report light smoking
A new research abstract being presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2016 Meeting reveals new details about teen smoking.

Percentage of US children who have chronic health conditions on the rise
The percentage of children with chronic health conditions is on the rise, and new research being presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2016 Meeting shows this is especially true among children who live in or near poverty.

Diluted apple juice, preferred fluids for treating mild gastroenteritis in kids
Children with mild gastroenteritis and minimal dehydration experienced fewer treatment failures such as IV rehydration or hospitalization when offered half-strength apple juice followed by their preferred fluid choice compared with children who received electrolyte maintenance solution to replace fluid losses, according to a study published online by JAMA.

Breastfeeding app shows promise in supporting first-time mothers
A pilot study found that use of a mobile phone app that provided supportive texts and an online community significantly increased the rate of breastfeeding among new mothers.

One-third of autistic children likely to wander, disappear
More than one-third of children with autism spectrum disorders have wandered away from a safe environment within the past 12 months, according to findings from two studies reported at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting in Baltimore.

Study suggests breastmilk promotes brain development in preemies
With organs including the brain completing development during the final months and weeks of pregnancy, it may not be surprising that preterm birth is a leading cause of neurologic problems in children.

Alcohol brand placement on TV linked with teens' brand preferences and drinking behaviors
While tobacco companies have not been allowed to buy product placement in television shows since 2000, alcohol brands continue to self-regulate their marketing in media.

Stronger state policies reduce alcohol-related motor vehicle deaths among teens
Motor vehicle injuries are a leading cause of death among youth in the United States, and one in three deaths from automobile crashes are alcohol-related.

Aerial spraying to combat mosquitos linked to increased risk of autism in children
New research to be presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2016 Meeting suggests that the use of airplanes to spray anti-mosquito pesticides may increase the risk of autism spectrum disorder and developmental delays among children.

Legalization of marijuana in Washington had no effect on teens' access to drug
Despite concerns that legalizing marijuana use for adults would make it easier for adolescents to get ahold of it, a new study in Washington State shows that teens find it no easier now than before the law was passed in 2012.

Complete rest until symptom-free after concussion may not be best for recovery
Rest has long been the cornerstone of concussion treatment. For sports-related head injuries, for example, current guidelines say children should avoid returning to play -- and all other physical activity -- until all concussion symptoms such as headaches are gone.

Radiation and immunotherapy combination can destroy both primary and secondary tumors
Research to be presented to the ESTRO 35 conference today has shown that the addition of an immune system-strengthening compound to radiation therapy can extend the radiation therapy-induced immune response against the tumor sites and that this response even has an effect on tumors outside the radiation field.

Parents' presence at bedside found to decrease neonatal abstinence syndrome severity
New research to be presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2016 Meeting suggests a key to easing the opioid withdrawal symptoms of neonatal abstinence syndrome is to ensure parents can spend plenty of time at the baby's bedside during treatment.

Exposure to tobacco smoke in the home increases childhood illnesses, health care demand
Children who live with smokers end up in the doctor's office or hospital more often than those not exposed to tobacco smoke, according to new research being presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2016 Meeting.

Concerns raised with products marketed as 'first finger foods'
A research abstract to be presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2016 Meeting found many products marketed as 'first finger foods' for babies failed to meet American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations that they be small, soft and easy to swallow.

One in six children hospitalized for lung inflammation positive for marijuana exposure
A new study to be presented at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2016 Meeting found that one in six infants and toddlers admitted to a Colorado hospital with coughing, wheezing and other symptoms of bronchiolitis tested positive for marijuana exposure.

Exempt from passenger restraint laws, taxis pose risky rides for small children
The vast majority of small children riding in taxis are not restrained in car safety seats, according to new research, even though there are tens of thousands of motor vehicle collisions involving taxis, limousines and car services each year.

Stress and depression is linked to HPV-related health problems
New research to be highlighted at the Pediatric Academic Societies 2016 Meeting is the first to suggest that stress and depression play a significant role in whether a woman with human papillomavirus (HPV) can get rid of her infection or not.
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