Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

May 29, 2016
Premature babies may grow up to have weaker bones
Low birth weight babies are at higher risk of osteoporosis later in life, especially if they are born prematurely.

Quiet please in the intensive care unit!
A study presented at Euroanaesthesia 2016 shows that noise levels in the Intensive Care Unit can go well above recommended levels, disturbing both patients and the medical teams that care for them.

Study shows patients require less painkilling medication after breast-cancer surgery if they have opiate-free anesthesia
New research presented at Euroanaesthesia 2016 shows that patients undergoing breast cancer surgery need less painkilling medication post-surgery if they have anesthesia that is free of opioid drugs.

Using solid-state materials with gold nanoantennas for more durable solar cells
Hokkaido University scientists are testing the development of solar cells made of solid materials to improve their ability to function under harsh environmental conditions.

Identifying how Merkel cell polyomavirus infection can cause a lethal carcinoma
A benign virus normally found in the skin can lead to a type of rare, lethal skin cancer.

Wind turbines on Galapagos replace millions of liters of diesel since 2007, meet 30 percent of energy needs
A trio of wind turbines operating on the Galapagos Islands since 2007 has mitigated the need for diesel imports and inspired an ambitious plan to expand renewable energy in this ecologically precious archipelago with a growing appetite for electricity.

America's lack of woman president 'exceptional'; Hillary Clinton suited for job
It's high time the United States elected the first woman president, and Hillary Clinton's ability to handle global and domestic issues makes her most qualified to do the job, according to a new book edited by Dinesh Sharma, associate research professor at the Institute for Global Cultural Studies, Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Child's play: Australia's newest roboticists see eye-to-eye with R2-D2
Children from age 4 can become robot programmers rather than waiting for the higher years in schooling, says a QUT education researcher.
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