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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 12, 2016


PET detects neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis
The triggers of autoimmune inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) have eluded scientists for many years, but molecular imaging is bringing researchers closer to identifying them, while providing a means of evaluating next-generation therapies for MS, say researchers introducing a study at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.
Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy may eliminate colorectal cancer
An emerging cancer therapy has colorectal tumors surrounded. Presenters at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging are unveiling a novel radioimmunotherapy that combines a cancer-seeking antibody with potent radionuclide agents, resulting in complete remission of colorectal cancer in mouse models.
Ross McDougall, M.D., Ch.B., Ph.D., receives SNMMI 2016 Georg Charles de Hevesy Award
Ross McDougall, M.D., Ch.B., Ph.D., professor emeritus of radiology and medicine at Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., has been named this year's recipient of the Georg Charles de Hevesy Nuclear Pioneer Award for his contributions to nuclear medicine.
Rethink rehabilitation to reverse frailty
One in four patients with COPD referred for exercise rehabilitation are frail, but nevertheless can respond favourably to rehabilitation and their frailty can be reversed, finds a new study led by King's College London and Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust.
UAEU receives patent from the Patent Office of the Cooperation Council for the Arab States
UAEU received a patent from the Patent Office of the Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf for the invention of a new concrete composition of oil and industrial waste.
PET/CT reveals adaptations of the alcoholic brain
Alcoholism is a devastating disorder that too often leads to a perpetual cycle of abuse.
Diabetes Collaborative Registry releases baseline, quality of care data
Clinicians submitting data to the Diabetes Collaborative Registry regularly adhere to 4 out of 7 diabetes quality metrics when treating patients with diabetes, according to the first presented results from the registry.
Peter S. Conti, M.D., Ph.D., receives SNMMI 2016 Paul C. Aebersold Award
Peter S. Conti, M.D., Ph.D., FACNP, FACR, professor of radiology, pharmaceutical sciences and biomedical engineering, and director of the Molecular Imaging Center, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, has been named the 2016 recipient of the prestigious Paul C.
Blood test predicts success of neuroendocrine cancer therapy
Malignant neuroendocrine tumors are relatively rare, notoriously difficult to treat, and associated with poor long-term survival.
Predicting disease outbreaks using environmental changes
A model that predicts outbreaks of zoonotic diseases -- those originating in livestock or wildlife such as Ebola and Zika -- based on changes in climate, population growth and land use has been developed by a UCL-led team of researchers.
New 'ukidama' nanoparticle structure revealed
A unique structure of copper-silver nanoparticles has been identified that resemble the Japanese glass fishing floats called ukidama.
Boosting immunity in older adults: UA unmasks new infection-fighting T cells
Immune-system frailty in adults 65 and older is a widespread public health issue.
Antibody-based drug helps 'bridge' leukemia patients to curative treatment
In a randomized Phase III study of the drug inotuzumab ozogamicin, a statistically significant percentage of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) whose disease had relapsed following standard therapies, qualified for stem cell transplants.
Being born small or stress during pregnancy can lead to greater disease risk in mothers
Low birth weight or stress during pregnancy can lead to long-term health problems in women, according to a study published today in The Journal of Physiology.

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