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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | October 23, 2016


No evidence climate change boosts coffee plant disease
Fears that climate change is promoting a fungal disease which can devastate coffee crops may be unfounded, research by the University of Exeter suggests.
Patients benefit from enhanced recovery programs: Are better prepared for surgery, have less pain
Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs, an important component of the Perioperative Surgical Home (PSH), are helping patients better prepare for surgery and recuperate faster afterward, according to two new studies being presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2016 annual meeting.
AI predicts outcomes of human rights trials
The judicial decisions of the European Court of Human Rights have been predicted to 79 percent accuracy using an artificial intelligence (AI) method developed by researchers in UCL, the University of Sheffield and the University of Pennsylvania.
Many back pain patients get limited relief from opioids and worry about taking them
Millions of people take opioids for chronic back pain, but many of them get limited relief while experiencing side effects and worrying about the stigma associated with taking them, suggests research presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting.
Research shows physical activity does not improve after hip replacement
New research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows that, surprisingly, patients' physical activity does not increase following hip replacement surgery.

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