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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | November 12, 2016


Staying on dmards through surgery does not increase post-op infection risk
Rheumatoid arthritis patients who keep using their disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs prior to surgery do not face an increased risk of infection after their procedures, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
TNF inhibitors don't appear to increase malignancy risk in juvenile arthritis patients
Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, a group of biologic drugs used to treat children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are not associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
Children need conventional CPR; black and Hispanic children more likely to get Hands-Only
While compressions-only or Hands-Only CPR is as good as conventional CPR for adults, children benefit more from the conventional approach that includes rescue breaths.
CPR training less common among older adults, who may be at highest risk of sudden cardiac arrest
More than 350,000 Americans suffer from out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest each year.
Combination of NSAIDs and TNF-inhibitors shows benefit for ankylosing spondylitis
A combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TNF-inhibitors may help slow down spine damage in ankylosing spondylitis, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
Cardiovascular event risk of RA patients comparable to type-2 diabetes over 15-year period
Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with serious risk of cardiovascular (CV) disease events such as heart attack or stroke.
First-line therapy with rituximab may lower mortality risk in RA patients with lung conditions
Patients with rheumatoid arthritis who also have lung involvement often have increased mortality, but first-line therapy with rituximab may help them live longer when compared with the use of TNF inhibitors , according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
Men and women show sex-specific improvements after hip replacement
Outcomes such as pain, function, range of motion, and strength after total hip arthroplasty, or joint replacement surgery, are different for men and women, which could lead to the development of sex-specific rehabilitation programs, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
Wnt inhibitor may ease pain, and improve function and cartilage loss in knee OA
Injection of a Wnt inhibitor drug showed promise to ease pain, improve joint function, and even slow or reverse cartilage loss in patients with knee osteoarthritis, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington in Washington.
CPR skills low among older adults
CPR knowledge is low in many communities, especially among older adults.
Use of statins before cardiac arrest may aid survival afterwards
Patients who have been using cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins fare better after a cardiac arrest than non-users.
Mayo Clinic research sheds light on why some rheumatoid arthritis patients respond poorly to biologics
A Mayo Clinic study is shedding light on why some rheumatoid arthritis patients respond poorly when treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, part of a class of drugs called biologics.
Myocardial inflammation elevated in RA patients
Two new studies measure the prevalence of myocardial inflammation in RA patients without known cardiovascular disease, assess how it is associated with high disease activity and show how disease-modifying therapy may decrease this type of inflammation, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
Urate-lowering therapy helps chronic kidney disease patients improve organ function
Chronic kidney disease patients who take urate-lowering therapy and achieve target urate levels show improvement in kidney function, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
Women & long-term axial spondyloarthropathy patients at higher risk for manifestations
Gender and disease duration can help predict which axial spondyloarthritis patients will develop extra-articular manifestations such as uveitis, or inflammation of the eye, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
New funding strategies & graduate education needed to fill rheumatology workforce gaps
The US adult rheumatology workforce is in jeopardy of a serious decline, and incentives to pursue rheumatology training, including help with graduate medical education funding, could provide critical relief, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting Washington.
Too many patients with inflammatory joint diseases undermanaged for cardiovascular risk
While patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or spondyloarthritis are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, too few are prescribed preventive medications or meeting target goals to prevent heart-related events, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
Race, ethnicity and education levels linked to delays accessing lupus specialty care
Lupus patients who are African-American or Asian, or those who have attained only a high school education or less, had longer delays in seeing a rheumatologist or nephrologist for a confirmed diagnosis than other groups, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
Gut bacteria may be a trigger for antiphospholipid syndrome
The gut microbiomes of patients with antiphospholipid syndrome show higher levels of phospholipid-producing bacteria, and this findings point to microbes being a trigger for this life-threatening disease, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
Most people with knee OA meet physical function level to walk recommended 6,000 steps a day
People with knee osteoarthritis (OA) often have difficulty with physical function, such as getting out of a chair and walking, which limits the ability to be physically active.
Three gene sets could predict response to rheumatoid arthritis therapies
Three gene expression signatures can help rheumatologists predict which patients are more likely to respond to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) or B-cell depletion therapies in patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
Monocyte gene expression signatures predict how ra patients respond to anti-TNF therapy
Distinct gene expression signatures in rheumatoid arthritis patients could help rheumatologists predict how these individuals will respond to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, and may one day enable a more personalized approach to RA therapy, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
Statins may lower mortality risk in ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis patients
Patients with ankylosing spondylitis or psoriatic arthritis who take statins may have as much as a 33 percent lower mortality risk, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
Allopurinol does not increase chronic kidney disease risk in gout patients
Allopurinol, a widely used treatment for lowering serum urate levels, does not appear to increase risk of kidney deterioration in gout patients with normal or near-normal kidney function, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.
Frequent simulation-based training may improve CPR proficiency among hospital staff
Mobile simulation training can improve CPR proficiency among hospital personnel.
Behavioral intervention reduces anxiety, depression among adults impaired by psychological distress
In a study published online by JAMA, Atif Rahman, Ph.D., of the University of Liverpool, England, and colleagues evaluated the effectiveness of a multicomponent behavioral intervention delivered in primary care centers in Peshawar, Pakistan by lay health workers to adults with psychological distress.
Rheumatology practices differ widely on meeting quality measures for patient care
Rheumatology practices in the United States aren't always meeting key quality measures for patient care that may affect them as new physician reimbursement laws go into effect in the next year, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
CPR from bystanders associated with better outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in pediatrics
Receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation from a bystander -- compared with not -- was associated with better overall and neurologically favorable survival for children and adolescents who had out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.
More coordinated care between physicians may improve lipid screenings in RA patients
Patients with rheumatoid arthritis whose rheumatologists and primary-care physicians coordinate their care have a higher likelihood of being screened for hyperlipidemia, a key risk factor for coronary heart disease, according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting in Washington.
Bystander CPR improves survival, neurological outcomes in US children
Children who suffer cardiac arrest outside a hospital setting are more likely to survive, and to have better neurological outcomes, when they receive bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation.
First patient enrolled in the INNODIA European sample collection effort
Just one year after the kick-off of INNODIA, the IMI-supported European consortium has accomplished its first major milestone.

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