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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | November 13, 2016


Women with congenital heart disease have better shot at healthy pregnancies
New research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania reveals that women with CHD who are deemed high risk by conventional measures are more likely to have safe, healthy pregnancies than current risk-assessments suggest.
Cardiovascular health linked to cellular aging
The age of a person's immune cells may predict risk of cardiovascular disease, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.
Study reveals role of spleen in prolonged anxiety after stress
Scientists are uncovering clues to what might be unfolding in the relationship between the brain and immune system in those who suffer from long-term repercussions of stress.
Children born by cesarean section may have a greater risk of obesity
Compared with vaginally delivered children, those born by cesarean section had a 1.4 times greater odds of becoming overweight or obese in childhood.
Study finds large decrease in coronary heart disease in US
The incidence of coronary heart disease in the US declined nearly 20 percent from 1983 to 2011, according to a study appearing in the Nov.
Sugary drink sales drop nearly 20 percent after multi-faceted campaign
Residents of Howard County, Md., reduced the amount of sugary drinks they purchased by nearly 20 percent after a multi-faceted public health campaign that included local policy changes.
New study finds cardiovascular rehabilitation helps reduce risk of death in depressed heart patients
Depression has been known to be associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes, but if patients who are depressed attend cardiac rehabilitation after heart surgery, their risk of death is significantly reduced, according to a new study.
USPSTF issues recommendations regarding use of statins for the prevention of cardiovascular disease
The US Preventive Services Task Force has issued a recommendation statement regarding the use of statins for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in adults.
Personalized breast cancer program launches in Cambridge
A new personalized breast cancer program which will map patients' DNA and RNA to tailor treatment for individuals launches at the Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute.
Inherited taste perceptions may explain why some people eat too much salt
People with enhanced bitter taste perception are almost twice as likely to consume too much sodium as people with less acute tasting ability.
13-country precision trial looks at cardiovascular effects of anti-inflammatory drug use
A 10-year trial involving osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis patients in 13 countries reveals new insights on the cardiovascular safety of widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and COX-2-specific inhibitors, according to new research findings to be presented on this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting.
Catheter ablations reduce risks of stroke in heart patients with stroke history, study finds
Atrial fibrillation patients with a prior history of stroke who undergo catheter ablation to treat the abnormal heart rhythm lower their long-term risk of a recurrent stroke by 50 percent, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute.
Elderly heart attack survivors rarely filled prescription smoking cessation medications
Elderly smokers who were discharged from the hospital after having a heart attack rarely filled prescriptions for medications that might help them quit smoking, despite being counseled about the need to quit during their hospital stay, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.
Most smartphone healthy diet applications fall short of recommended guidelines
Most smartphone applications claiming to improve consumers' diet, nutrition or eating habits are not compliant with evidence-based scientific guidelines, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.
Physically fit adults have lower statin-induced diabetes risk
Being fit may protect those who take cholesterol-lowering statins from developing statin-induced Type 2 diabetes, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.
'Back to the Future' inspires solar nanotech-powered clothing
Marty McFly's self-lacing Nikes in 'Back to the Future Part II' inspired a University of Central Florida scientist who has developed filaments that harvest and store the sun's energy -- and can be woven into textiles.
New peripheral artery disease guidelines emphasize medical therapy and structured exercise
Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) should be on a program of guideline-directed medical therapy (including antiplatelet drugs that thin blood and statins to lower cholesterol) and should participate in a structured exercise program.
Marijuana use may be linked to temporarily weakened heart muscle
Younger marijuana users were twice as likely as non-users to experience stress cardiomyopathy, a sudden, usually temporary, weakening of the heart muscle that occurs more commonly in older women.
Low growth in global carbon emissions continues for third successive year
Global carbon emissions from burning fossil fuels did not grow in 2015 and are projected to rise only slightly in 2016, marking three years of almost no growth, according to researchers at the University of East Anglia and the Global Carbon Project.
Study finds following a healthy lifestyle can greatly reduce genetic heart attack risk
A study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found that, even among those at high genetic risk for heart disease, following a healthy lifestyle can cut in half the probability of a heart attack or similar event.
Drug therapy, LVAD helps severe heart failure patients recover function
Advanced heart failure patients who are treated with an artificial heart assist device combined with intensive drug therapy may recover their heart function.
Two differing medications used during heart procedure are both safe and effective, study finds
Two differing blood clot prevention medications are just as safe and effective for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention, a non-surgical procedure to open blood vessels narrowed by plaque buildup, according to a new study.
Competitive males are a blessing and a curse, study reveals
Showy ornaments used by the male of the species in competition for mates, such as the long tail of a peacock or shaggy mane of a lion, could indicate a species' risk of decline in a changing climate, according to a new study from Queen Mary University of London.
Heat shock regulator controlled by on/off switch and phosphorylation
Whitehead Institute researchers have determined how the master transcriptional regulator of the heat shock response, known as heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), is controlled in yeast.
Moderate alcohol intake may slow good cholesterol's decline
In a study of 80,000 healthy Chinese adults, moderate drinking was associated with slower declines in high-density lipoprotein, or good cholesterol, over time, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.
Diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids may help lower blood pressure in young, healthy adults
Healthy young people may be able to help prevent the onset of high blood pressure by eating diets rich in omega-3 fatty acids, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.
Smoking a pack or more a day increases diabetes risks among blacks
Smoking 20 or more cigarettes a day increases the risk of diabetes among blacks, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.
Most Americans consume too much sodium, not enough potassium
A majority of Americans consume too much sodium and not enough potassium, according to a preliminary study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2016.

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