Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

November 25, 2016
Scientists step closer to halting spread of lung cancer
Scientists at the universities of York and Texas have found that a component of cancer cells, which acts like a 'cellular post office,' could be the key to preventing the spread of lung cancer to other parts of the body.

Springer Nature provides Italian universities hit by earthquake free access to electronic content
Springer Nature will open its digital resources to two Italian universities affected by the earthquakes of this past August and October.

The consumer of the future will use a mobile phone to monitor his environment
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has created the world's first hyperspectral mobile device by converting an iPhone camera into a new kind of optical sensor.

New approach needed in way Tourette's syndrome is portrayed, research shows
Media stereotypes of people with Tourette's syndrome are leading to the stigmatizing of adolescents with the condition by their peers.

The fusion reactor that employs a liquid metal shower
The National Institutes of Natural Sciences National Institute for Fusion Science, as a potentially appropriate heat-receiving device for the future fusion reactor, has conceived of a new system for installing a liquid metal (melted tin) shower to high-temperature plasma periphery at intervals.

Adding clay to saline nanofluids creates useful materials
By controlling a mix of clay, water and salt, Norwegian and Brazilian researchers have created nanostructures that might help boost oil production, expand the lifespan of certain foods or that can be used in cosmetics or drugs.

People with Parkinson's show altered iron levels in their brains
Iron occurs naturally in the human body. However, in people with Parkinson's disease it distributes in an unusual way over the brain.

Hyperuricemia is associated with musculoskeletal pain
Episodes of diffuse musculoskeletal pain appearing in and around a joint region without a clear diagnosis, etiology and therapy are still a major problem in general medical practice.

Why air pollutants make some people vulnerable to atopic dermatitis
Researchers announce the results of a study into why air pollutants cause some people to be more susceptible to atopic dermatitis, a kind of skin inflammation.

Regenerative grazing improves soil health and plant biodiversity
Regenerative practices improve soil quality and pasture diversity, as the European LIFE Regen Farming project, due to end this year, has been able to show.

'Diamond-age' of power generation as nuclear batteries developed
New technology has been developed that uses nuclear waste to generate electricity in a nuclear-powered battery.

New method for predicting congenital CMV infection during the prenatal period
Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection can cause serious complications such as hearing difficulties and mental retardation in affected infants.

Physicists spell 'AV' by manipulating Abrikosov vortices
A nanophotonics group lead by Prof. Brahim Lounis of the University of Bordeaux and including scientists from MIPT has performed a unique experiment involving the optical manipulation of individual Abrikosov vortices in a superconductor.

A novel anticandidal compound containing sulfur from endophytic fungus
There is a continuous search for new, safe and relatively cheaper drugs with the advent of new diseases and increasing antibiotic resistance.

Dartmouth researchers break new territory analyzing DNA modifications in glioblastoma
Using state-of-the-art molecular biology and statistical approaches, researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have identified the functional role of two distinct DNA modifications in glioblastoma tissues.

New drug limits and then repairs brain damage in stroke
Researchers at the University of Manchester have discovered that a potential new drug reduces the number of brain cells destroyed by stroke and then helps to repair the damage.

MNI researchers receive funding to study ARSACS
Two researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University have received funding to study a devastating neurodegenerative disease that first appears in toddlers just as they are beginning to walk.

Enough is enough -- stem cell factor Nanog knows when to slow down
The transcription factor Nanog plays a crucial role in the self-renewal of embryonic stem cells.

Theory that challenges Einstein's physics could soon be put to the test
Scientists behind a theory that the speed of light is variable -- and not constant as Einstein suggested -- have made a prediction that could be tested.

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine named University of the Year 2016
The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine has been awarded the prestigious University of the Year award at the Times Higher Education Awards 2016.

Tricky gene mutations detected by free, fast, easy-to-use new software
Scientists have developed an easy-to-use software tool that can detect important genetic mutations that previously needed to be identified by a separate test.

New method developed for analyzing photonic crystal structure
A new technique developed by MIT researchers reveals the inner details of photonic crystals, synthetic materials whose exotic optical properties are the subject of widespread research.

CNIC scientists discover a key signal in intercellular communication
The study describes a cell signal that controls intercellular communication and could play a central role in biomedical strategies such as gene therapy, vaccine design, and immunotherapy.

Three rings stop cell division in plants
Arising from a collaboration between plant and animal biologists, and organic chemists at ITbM, Nagoya University, the group succeeded in developing a new compound, a triarylmethane that can rapidly inhibit cell division in plants.

DNA study offers blood test hope for bowel disease patients
Scientists at the University of Edinburgh have identified chemical changes in the DNA of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases that could improve screening for the conditions.
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