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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | December 04, 2016


Exploring how rice could survive salt stress
Real-time genetic detailing of rice plants highlights the roles of different loci in response to salt stress during growth.
Women with dementia receive less medical attention
Women with dementia have fewer visits to the GP, receive less health monitoring and take more potentially harmful medication than men with dementia, new UCL research reveals.
Yo-yo dieting might cause extra weight gain
Repeated dieting may lead to weight gain because the brain interprets the diets as short famines and urges the person to store more fat for future shortages, new research by the universities of Exeter and Bristol suggests.
Advocacy and community health care models complement research and clinical care
Global lung cancer researchers and patient advocates today emphasized that new models of delivering care and communicating about cancer care play an important role in the fight against lung cancer.
Progress on deep meridional overturning circulation in the South China Sea
The intruding Pacific deep water through the Luzon Strait transforms and upwells due to intensified diapycnal mixing in the South China Sea (SCS), contributing to the SCS meridional overturning circulation (MOC), which is modulated by the complicate topography.
Melbourne scientists publish evidence for world-first therapeutic dental vaccine
A world-first vaccine developed by Melbourne scientists, which could eliminate or at least reduce the need for surgery and antibiotics for severe gum disease, has been validated by research published this weekend in a leading international journal.
The promise of greener power generation
The characterization of compounds produced in combustion could lead to cleaner, more efficient power stations.
Torture: Rehabilitation experts from 80 nations meet in Mexico City
Over 300 participants -- 70 percent of them clinical professionals -- from 80 nations will exchange expertise on torture rehabilitation at a scientific symposium, Mexico City Dec.
Highly efficient genome engineering in flowering plants
Plant biologists at ITbM, Nagoya University have developed a genome editing method to knockout target genes in a model plant with high efficiency.
Gut microbes contribute to recurrent 'yo-yo' obesity
New research in mice may in the future help dieters keep the weight off.
Detective work across dingo fence reveals new factor in woody shrub invasion
Extermination of dingoes and the consequent loss of small mammals -- not just overgrazing by livestock -- have led to a rapid spread of woody shrubs across semi-arid Australia, a new study shows.
UK Winter 2015/2016 floods: One of the century's most extreme and severe flood episodes
A new scientific review of the winter floods of 2015/2016 confirms that the event was one of the most extreme and severe hydrological events of the last century.
A handful of nuts a day cuts the risk of a wide range of diseases
A large analysis of current research shows that people who eat at least 20g of nuts a day have a lower risk of heart disease, cancer and other diseases.
Geneticist Stephen J. Elledge wins Breakthrough Prize
Stephen J. Elledge, the Gregor Mendel Professor of Genetics at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, has been named a 2017 recipient of the Breakthrough Prize, which recognizes paradigm-shifting discoveries in the life sciences, physics, and mathematics.
Role of molecular modification in determining physical activity levels revealed
Osaka University-led researchers showed that RNA editing of the molecule CAPS1 is associated with increased dense core vesicle exocytosis, the mechanism by which cells export materials such as catecholamines.

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