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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | December 10, 2016


Next-generation accelerators get boost from new beam physics
A new research, affiliated with UNIST reported the full generalization of the KV model by including all of the linear (both external and space-charge) coupling forces, beam energy variations, and arbitrary emittance partition, which all form essential elements for phase-space manipulations.
Circulation favors placenta over brain in fetuses of diabetic mothers
Blood flows preferentially to the placenta instead of the brain in fetuses of mothers with diabetes, reveals research presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2016.
Heart damage caused by chemotherapy is worse in patients with diabetes
Heart damage caused by chemotherapy is worse in cancer patients who also have diabetes, according to a study presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2016.

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