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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | January 15, 2017


E-waste in East and Southeast Asia jumps 63 percent in 5 years
Volumes of discarded electronics in East and Southeast Asia jumped almost two-thirds between 2010 and 2015, and e-waste generation is growing fast in both volume and per capita measures, new UN research shows.
Key cardiovascular risk factors for Chinese Australians uncovered
Diabetes, smoking and physical inactivity have been uncovered as the key cardiovascular disease risk factors for Chinese Australians according to important new research from the largest ongoing study of healthy ageing in Australia, the Sax Institute's 45 and Up Study.
China develops world's brightest VUV free electron laser research facility
A team of Chinese scientists announced on Jan. 15 that they have developed a new bright VUV FEL light source, the Dalian Coherent Light Source (DCLS), which can deliver world's brightest FEL light in an energy range from 8 to 24 eV, making it unique of the same kind that only operates in the VUV region.
Computational modeling reveals anatomical distribution of drag on downhill skiers
University of Tsukuba researchers established a computer simulation-based approach to obtain precise 3-D data on the flow of air around a downhill skier's body.

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