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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | January 27, 2017


Women treated for precursor of breast cancer can expect to live as long as other women
Women over 50 who have been treated for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a precursor of breast cancer, are more likely to be alive ten years later than women in the general population, according to new research presented at the European Cancer Congress 2017.
Star birth with a chance of winds?
The lesser-known constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs), is home to a variety of deep-sky objects -- including this beautiful galaxy, known as NGC 4861.
Absorbing electromagnetic energy while avoiding the heat
Electrical engineers at Duke University have created the world's first structured metamaterial made without metal that can absorb electromagnetic energy.
Safe uti­li­za­tion of die­ta­ry su­gars requi­res dy­na­mic cont­rol of re­dox ba­lance
Without dynamic control of redox balance animals lose their ability to survive on sugar-rich food.
Climate models may underestimate future warming on tropical mountains
By reconstructing past temperature change on Mount Kenya in East Africa, a new study suggests that future temperature changes on tropical mountains might be underestimated.
Climate changes may lead to more poisonous mercury in plankton
Global warming is expected to increase runoff and input of organic matter to aquatic ecosystems in large regions of the Northern hemisphere including the Baltic Sea.
Andalusian scientists reconstruct what the Gibraltar Arc was like 9 million years ago
A team of Andalusian scientists, led by the University of Granada (UGR), has been able to reconstruct for the first time what the Gibraltar Arc was like 9 million years ago.
Chronic sleep deprivation suppresses immune system
Many people report getting sick when they don't get enough sleep.
TSRI scientists find brain hormone that triggers fat burning
Biologists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a brain hormone that appears to trigger fat burning in the gut.
Nordic countries are bringing about an energy transition worth copying
What can we learn from the Nordic low-carbon energy transition given the new US leadership vacuum on climate change?
Rebalancing gut microbiome lengthens survival in mouse model of ALS
A bacterial by-product known to be important in maintaining gut health may slow the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS -- a progressive, neurodegenerative disease.
Artificial intelligence uncovers new insight into biophysics of cancer
For the first time, artificial intelligence has been used to discover the exact interventions needed to obtain a specific, previously unachievable result in vivo, providing new insight into the biophysics of cancer and raising broad implications for biomedicine.
New system for therapeutic gene delivery increases transgene expression up to 100-fold
Advanced engineering of a mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) system designed to carry a therapeutic gene can significantly enhance the expression of the transgene delivered using an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector.
Study: Impact of genetics on human height is not increasing
The relative impact of genetics on height does not increase with improvements to the standard of living.
Physics: Toward a practical nuclear pendulum
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) Munich have, for the first time, measured the lifetime of an excited state in the nucleus of an unstable element.
Small but mighty: Fruit fly muscles
A new study explains the nimble, complex maneuvers that allow the pesky fruit fly to evade being swatted.
Dogs share food with other dogs even in complex situations
Dogs also share their food, albeit mainly with four-legged friends rather than strangers.
New 'needle-pulse' beam pattern packs a punch
A new beam pattern devised by University of Rochester researchers could bring unprecedented sharpness to ultrasound and radar images, burn precise holes in manufactured materials at a nano scale -- even etch new properties onto their surfaces.
Clue to how cancer cells spread
In a second human case, a Yale-led research team has found that a melanoma cell and a white blood cell can fuse to form a hybrid with the ability to metastasize.
Both accelerator and brake are required for normal movement
In order to drive a car, you need a good balance between accelerator and brake.
Antibodies as 'messengers' in the nervous system
Antibodies are able to activate human nerve cells within milliseconds and hence modify their function -- that is the surprising conclusion of a study carried out at Human Biology at the Technical University of Munich (TUM).
Rapid trait evolution crucial to species growth, CU Boulder study finds
Rapid evolution at the edges of a given species habitat may play a larger role in population expansions than previously suspected, according to the results of a new University of Colorado Boulder-led study.
Diverse natural fatty acids follow 'Golden Mean'
Bioinformatics scientists at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany) have discovered that the number of theoretically possible fatty acids with the same chain length but different structures can be determined with the aid of the famous Fibonacci sequence.
Sciences for art
Conservation and preservation of historical monuments as well as of single artworks of our cultural heritage are receiving increasing attention.
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Multi-drug resistant bacteria in China
The mcr-1 gene -- a gene that makes bacteria resistant to colistin, an antibiotic of last resort, and that is transferrable between bacteria -- has been found in a wide variety of strains of Escherichia coli in China following widespread use of colistin in agriculture.
Survey on Americans' priorities finds health care, unemployment, immigration, education top list
Health care, unemployment, immigration, and education top a lengthy and varied list of the American public's policy priorities for 2017, according to a new national survey conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.
Chiral quantum optics: A new research field with bright perspectives
Surprising direction-dependent effects emerge when light is guided in microscopic structures.
The ancient Indus civilization's adaptation to climate change
A new article explores how an ancient culture dealt with variable environments.
Stem cell secretions may protect against glaucoma
A new study in rats shows that stem cell secretions, called exosomes, appear to protect cells in the retina, the light-sensitive tissue in the back of the eye.
Researchers explore how protein production gets distorted in skin cancer
Researchers have shown that a shift in translation, the process by which cells produce proteins from RNA, may promote skin cancer.
CAS scientists discover BCAS2 involved in alternative mRNA splicing in spermatogonia and the transit to meiosis
Recently, a work led by Professor Li Lei in Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, reported that BCAS2 is involved in alternative mRNA splicing in mouse spermatogonia and the transition to meiosis.
Bacteria in the cervix may be key to understanding premature birth
Depending on the specific type, bacteria in a woman's vagina and cervix may increase the risk of premature birth or protect against it, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
Old enzyme, new role
A team of researchers at the University of Delaware has discovered a new function for an enzyme that has long been known to have a central role in bacterial metabolism.
When life sciences become data sciences
The University of Freiburg offers Europe-wide infrastructure and service in Bioinformatics.
New techniques allow greater control of smartwatches
Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have invented new ways to interact that provide a little more control, including taps of the skin, nudges on the side of the watch and breathing on the screen.
Beetles born on the edge make invasion faster
Rice University ecologists find that rapid evolution can cause biological invasions to spread faster and with more variability.
New project aims to build resilience to earthquakes in the remote Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan
A new interdisciplinary project led by researchers at the University of Bristol aims to develop resilience and research capacity in the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan to cope with earthquakes and their cascading effects on the country's environment, business, infrastructure, and society.
Human factors and ergonomics society proposals invited
The meeting program will feature the latest research and practice on areas such as automation, patient safety, occupational health and safety, surface and air transportation, virtual environments, and children's issues.
A new approach to 3-D holographic displays greatly improves the image quality
A research team led by Professor YongKeun Park of the Physics Department at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) has come up with a solution and developed a 3-D holographic display that performs more than 2,600 times better than existing 3-D holographic displays.
Researchers help the body protect itself against inflammation and colon cancer
Virginia Tech researchers found that modifying the shape of IRAK-M, a protein that controls inflammation, can significantly reduce the clinical progression of both diseases in pre-clinical animal models.
A systems biology perspective on molecular cytogenetics
Professor Henry Heng's team, from the medical school at Wayne State University, has published a perspective article titled A Systems Biology Perspective on Molecular Cytogenetics to address the issue.
Unexpected result: Ocean acidification can also promote shell formation
Fact: more carbon dioxide (CO2) in the air also acidifies the oceans.
New survey finds many Americans want changes to ACA but few support immediate repeal
According to a new national survey on Americans' opinions on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) conducted by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, 12 percent of Americans want the ACA kept in its current form, 40 percent say it should be preserved with improvements, 16 percent say the law should be repealed immediately, and 31 percent want a repeal to wait until a replacement is ready.
The link between growth of retail-based clinics & nurse practitioner scope-of-practice reform
Just as primary care provider shortages are becoming acute, retail-based clinics in pharmacies and grocery stores are set to fill the gap in accessible patient care.
Toxic mercury in aquatic life could spike with greater land runoff
A highly toxic form of mercury could jump by 300 to 600 percent in zooplankton -- tiny animals at the base of the marine food chain -- if land runoff increases by 15 to 30 percent, according to a new study.
Aerospace engineering doctoral student earns NASA Pathways internship
Cody Ground, a doctoral student in The University of Texas at Arlington's Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, has earned a prestigious Pathways internship with the Hypersonic Air-Breathing Propulsion Branch at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.
Why people are so good at spotting product downsizing and so bad at judging supersizing
Consumers drastically underestimate portion supersizing but are incredibly accurate at spotting downsizing, making it difficult for food marketers to cut giant portions.
Finding credibility clues on Twitter
By scanning 66 million tweets linked to nearly 1,400 real-world events, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have built a language model that identifies words and phrases that lead to strong or weak perceived levels of credibility on Twitter.
A way out of the junk-food eating cycle
Context can lead to poor food choice and perpetuate junk-food eating.
Nanoparticles hitchhiking their way along strands of hair
In shampoo ads, hair always looks like a shiny, smooth surface.
Oral devices reduce sleep apnea but may not affect heart disease risk factors
In patients with severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), oral appliances that treat the condition by moving the lower jaw forward appear to improve sleep but not reduce key risk factors for developing heart and other cardiovascular disease, according to new research published online, ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
NASA studies cosmic radiation to protect high-altitude travelers
NASA scientists studying high-altitude radiation recently published new results on the effects of cosmic radiation in our atmosphere to help improve real-time radiation monitoring for aviation industry crew and passengers.
Roots of Alzheimer's disease can extend as far back as the womb
Biochemical reactions that cause Alzheimer's disease could begin in the womb or just after birth if the fetus or newborn does not get enough vitamin A, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.
Researchers develop label-free technique to image microtubules
Researchers in the Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois have been able to use label-free spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) and computer processing in order to image microtubules in an assay.
Haslam visits ORNL to highlight state's role in discovering tennessine
Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam visited the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory today to congratulate the ORNL team involved in the discovery of the element tennessine, named in recognition of the vital contributions of the state of Tennessee to the international search for new superheavy elements.
Anthropologists uncover art by (really) old masters -- 38,000 year-old engravings
An international team of anthropologists has uncovered a 38,000-year-old engraved image in a southwestern French rockshelter -- a finding that marks some of the earliest known graphic imagery found in Western Eurasia and offers insights into the nature of modern humans during this period.
PPPL scientist uncovers physics behind plasma-etching process
PPPL physicist Igor Kaganovich and collaborators have uncovered some of the physics that make possible the etching of silicon computer chips, which power cell phones, computers, and a huge range of electronic devices.
NASA sees development of Tropical Cyclone 3S along Western Australia's coast
A NASA satellite provided a look at heavy rainfall occurring in a tropical low pressure system as it was consolidating and strengthening into what became Tropical Storm 3S in Southwest Indian Ocean.
Evaluating the benefits of health insurance on cancer care
A new Dartmouth study shows that patients have lower rates of cancer-specific survival based on where they live and their social determinants of health.
Research suggests way to improve stroke treatments
Working with animal models, researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center now have demonstrated the potential of giving a drug in combination with tPA that might improve stroke outcomes and increase the window of opportunity for the therapy.
Where the wild things are
As climate change and biological invasions continue to impact global biodiversity, scientists at Colorado State University and the University of Colorado-Boulder suggest that the way organisms move to new areas, called range expansion, can be impacted directly by evolutionary changes.
'Survival gene' stops strains of TB mutating into deadly 'superbugs'
'Survival gene' stops strains of TB mutating into deadly 'superbugs.'

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