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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 03, 2017


Eclipse 2017: NASA supports a unique opportunity for science in the shadow
The first total solar eclipse in the continental United States in nearly 40 years takes place on Aug.
Number of children emerging as cardiovascular risk factor for both parents
Number of children is emerging as a novel factor that influences the risk for some cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and in some societies in both parents, according to Professor Vera Regitz-Zagrosek, chairperson of the European Society of Cardiology 'management of CVD During Pregnancy' guidelines task force.
$2.2 million from state will help speed UCI research to commercial market
The University of California, Irvine has received $2.2 million from the state that will be administered through UCI Applied Innovation to help speed research and innovations to commercialization.
Study addresses extreme thinness standards in fashion industry
In a recent study, female fashion models reported high levels of pressure to lose weight, which was associated with higher odds of engaging in unhealthy behaviors to control weight.
Outstanding Investigator Award honors University of Chicago cancer researcher
University of Chicago cancer specialist Thomas Gajewski, M.D., Ph.D., a pioneer in the field of cancer immunotherapy, has been awarded an Outstanding Investigator Award by the National Cancer Institute, a branch of the National Institutes of Health.
Empathetic people experience dogs' expressions more strongly
A study by the University of Helsinki and Aalto University explored how empathy and other psychological factors affect people's assessments of the facial images of dogs and humans.
Atomic-scale view of bacterial proteins offers path to new tuberculosis drugs
In studying a cousin of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, scientists have drawn a molecular map of the target for rifampicin, a common antibiotic.
Quantum RAM: Modelling the big questions with the very small
When it comes to studying transportation systems, stock markets and the weather, quantum mechanics is probably the last thing to come to mind.
One more reason to focus on prenatal care -- Stronger muscles for newborn babies
Malnutrition and stress negatively affect muscle stem cells in the fetus, and this could have life-long consequences.
Thirdhand smoke affects weight, blood cell development in mice
A new Berkeley Lab-led study found that the sticky residue left behind by tobacco smoke led to changes in weight and blood cell count in mice.
Cancer drug could promote regeneration of heart tissue
An anticancer agent in development promotes regeneration of damaged heart muscle -- an unexpected research finding that may help prevent congestive heart failure in the future.
A ground-breaking method for screening the most useful nanoparticles for medicine
Researchers from UNIGE UNIFR have devised a rapid screening method to select the most promising nanoparticles, thereby fast-tracking the development of future treatments.
Research supports expanded use of cell free DNA prenatal testing
Researchers at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, have published a study in Genetics in Medicine that shows that this non-invasive test can be effectively and appropriately offered to all pregnant women, regardless of maternal age or risk factors, through primary obstetrical care providers.
Leading US and Korean researchers to apply artificial intelligence to aging research
Insilico Medicine and Gachon University and Gil Medical Center have partnered to collaboratively develop biomarkers and interventions.
NASA taking stock of phytoplankton populations in the Pacific
Among the most pressing questions scientists are investigating is how much of that carbon is being stored in the ocean over the long term.
Couples with obesity may take longer to achieve pregnancy, NIH study suggests
Couples in which both partners are obese may take from 55 to 59 percent longer to achieve pregnancy, compared to their non-obese counterparts, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health.
Russian researchers developed high-pressure natural gas operating turbine-generator
Scientists of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) developed turbo expander electric generator operating on high-pressure natural gas.
Personality traits 'contagious' among children
When preschoolers spend time around one another, they tend to take on each others' personalities, indicates a new study by Michigan State University psychology researchers.
A new fight with old battle lines
Book explores what France's gay rights battle says about identity and belonging.
Efforts to restore imperiled Pando show promise says USU ecologist
Quaking aspen across the American West are stressed by a combination of sources, including drought, hungry herbivores, fire suppression and development.
Finding the needle in a genomic haystack
Researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) have identified a genomic mutation that causes physical abnormalities and developmental delays in children.
Protecting quantum computing networks against hacking threats
As we saw during the 2016 US election, protecting traditional computer systems, which use zeros and ones, from hackers is not a perfect science.
Red 'color channel' may aid in screening for diabetic eye disease
In photographs of the eye used to screen for diabetes-related eye disease, separating out the red color channel can help show some abnormalities -- especially in racial/ethnic minority patients, suggests a study in the February issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry.
Pilot study highlights role of grapes in preventing Alzheimer's disease
Consuming grapes twice a day for six months protected against significant metabolic decline in Alzheimer-related areas of the brain in a study of people with early memory decline.
Germanium outperforms silicon in energy efficient transistors with n- und p- conduction
NaMLab and cfaed reached an important breakthrough in the development of energy-efficient electronic circuits using transistors based on germanium.
University of Miami Health System and VitalMD launch unique collaboration
The University of Miami Health System and VitalMD Group Holdings LLC, and its wholly owned medical practices LLCs, have agreed to establish a strategic collaboration to advance the missions of both entities, improving access to high-quality medical care by creating a broader network of providers in the South Florida region.
Study traces black carbon sources in the Russian Arctic
Transport and residential heating could be responsible for a greater contribution of black carbon in the Russian Arctic compared to gas flaring or power plants, according to new research.
Machine learning method accurately predicts metallic defects
For the first time, Berkeley Lab researchers have built and trained machine learning algorithms to predict defect behavior in certain intermetallic compounds with high accuracy.
Faster way of detecting bacteria could save your life
A Michigan State University researcher has developed a faster way to detect the bacteria causing patients to become sick, giving physicians a better chance at saving their lives.
JAX receives $6.7 million federal research grant to create 3-D genome map
An NHGRI ENCODE grant to Jackson Laboratory Professor Yijun Ruan launches a center for the three-dimensional (3-D) mapping of the human and mouse genomes.
Search smarter not harder: Researchers present optimal strategy for foragers
Researchers reveal an optimal strategy for foragers -- animals searching for berries in the woods or prospectors seeking oil in the desert.
New software automates brain imaging
When humans and animals learn and form memories, the physical structures of their brain cells change.
Monoclonal antibody given to preterm babies may reduce wheeze later
Preterm babies given the monoclonal antibody palivizumab to prevent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) also appear less likely to develop recurrent wheeze, at least until the age of six, according to new research published online, ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Medicine.
Vegetation resilient to salvage logging after severe wildfire
Nearly a decade after being logged, vegetation in forested areas severely burned by California's Cone Fire in 2002 was relatively similar to areas untouched by logging equipment.
Research connects overeating during national sporting events to medical problems
People who overeat during national holidays and national sporting events -- like this weekend's Super Bowl -- are 10 times more likely to need emergency medical attention for food obstruction than any at other time of the year, according to a new study led by a University of Florida researcher.
New research paints a merciless picture of life as a deaf-blind person
It is like being in a dirty glass jar, unable to reach out and with acquaintances passing by without saying hello.
Surprise finding leads to new insights into splenic B cell differentiation
Researchers are familiar with the functions of MZB cells, but the molecular processes involved in their development remained a mystery until an unrelated test revealed that Taok3 plays an essential role.
A new study confirms: Pregnant women should avoid liquorice
A new Finnish study supports food recommendations for families with children in that women should avoid consuming large amounts of liquorice during pregnancy.
Men and women are not that different with respect to age preferences of sexual partners
The difference between men and women with respect to their age preferences, when it comes to sexual partners, is smaller than earlier believed.
'Brute force' can overcome antibiotic resistance
Antibiotics can still kill drug-resistant bacteria if they 'push' hard enough into bacterial cells, finds new UCL-led research funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.
Emoticons help gauge school happiness level in young children
The How I Feel About My School questionnaire, designed by experts at the University of Exeter Medical School, is available to download for free.
Hubble captures brilliant star death in 'rotten egg' nebula
The Calabash Nebula, pictured here -- which has the technical name OH 231.8+04.2 -- is a spectacular example of the death of a low-mass star like the sun.
Vilcek Prizes honor immigrants for outstanding contributions to biomedical science
The Vilcek Foundation announces Lily and Yuh-Nung Jan as the joint winners of the 2017 Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science; and Michaela Gack, Michael Halassa, and Ahmet Yildiz as recipients of the 2017 Vilcek Prizes for Creative Promise in Biomedical Science.
Wired for sound: Enraging noises caused by brain connection overdrive
While many of us may find the sounds of chewing or breathing off-putting, for some they're unbearable -- and new research has shown their brains are going into overdrive.
Researchers investigate decline in South Africa's forest-birds
Forest-dwelling bird species are disappearing from some of South Africa's indigenous forests, with forest birds in the Eastern Cape being the most affected.
Flipping the switch on ammonia production
University of Utah chemists publish a different method, using enzymes derived from nature, that generates ammonia at room temperature.
Salicylic acid promotes nasal mucosa colonization
An international research team, including scientists from Vetmeduni Vienna, has now shown that this multifaceted compound can also have an unpleasant side effect.
Dartmouth-led study finds mutual reinforcement of phenotypic diversity and cooperation
A new model exploring how evolutionary dynamics work in natural selection has found that phenotypic diversity, or an organism's observable traits, co-evolves with contingent cooperation when organisms with like traits work together to protect themselves from outsiders, according to a Dartmouth-led study published in PLOS Computational Biology.

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