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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 14, 2017


With stringent oversight, heritable human genome editing could be allowed
Clinical trials for genome editing of the human germline -- adding, removing, or replacing DNA base pairs in gametes or early embryos -- could be permitted in the future, but only for serious conditions under stringent oversight, says a new report from the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine.
Potential new causes for the odor-producing disorder TMAU
A study from the Monell Center and collaborators provides new insight into the causes of trimethylaminura (TMAU), a genetically transmitted metabolic disorder that leads to accumulation of a chemical that smells like rotting fish.
A new contrast agent for MRI
A specially coated iron oxide nanoparticle could provide an alternative to conventional gadolinium-based contrast agents used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
Researchers identify cells linked to the development of the heart's ventricular chambers
These findings could provide new insight and understanding of congenital heart defects.
Needless shocks from heart devices can trigger extra health costs, Stanford researcher say
A team led by a Stanford University School of Medicine researcher has discovered that shocks from implantable cardioverter defibrillators often trigger a cascade of health tests and interventions, even when the shocks they deliver are not needed.
Do children inherit drug protection from parents exposed to nicotine or drugs?
A father's nicotine use may have a significant impact on children's risk of some diseases.
When choosing your next move, your brain is always ready for plan B
Whether we're navigating a route to work or browsing produce at the grocery store, our brains are constantly making decisions about movement: Should I cross the street now or at the intersection?
Fractal edges shown to be key to imagery seen in Rorschach inkblots
Researchers have unlocked the mystery of why people have seen so many different images in Rorschach inkblots.
Canadian glaciers now major contributor to sea level change, UCI study shows
Ice loss from Canada's Arctic glaciers has transformed them into a major contributor to sea level change, new research by University of California, Irvine glaciologists has found.
Mind the (osteoporosis treatment) gap!
A new review, referencing key clinical studies, guidelines and audits, outlines the main global challenges (and their solutions) facing healthcare professionals and policymakers responsible for providing care to populations in relation to bone health and fracture prevention.
Population density pushes the 'slow life'
A new study by Arizona State University shows one psychological effect of population density is for those people living in urban areas to adopt a 'slow life strategy.' This strategy focuses more on planning for the long-term future and includes tactics like preferring long-term romantic relationships, having fewer children and investing more in education.
Two months left to register for The International Liver CongressTM 2017
With just over two months to go until The International Liver Congress™ (ILC) 2017, it's time to register for your seat!
Grant to help pave a big data highway to explore genome, enhance health
A $6.1 million, five-year grant from the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health may help researchers leverage massive amounts of genomic data to develop medical treatments and pharmaceuticals, according to an international team of researchers.
Extending VCSEL wavelength coverage to the mid-infrared
There are several important gases that are detectable with mid-infrared light, having wavelengths between 3-4 micrometers.
Findings suggest causal association between abdominal fat and development of type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease
A genetic predisposition to higher waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (a measure of abdominal adiposity [fat]) was associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease, according to a study appearing in the Feb.
Gene variants associated with body shape increase risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes
A study from Massachusetts General Hospital researchers has found that a pattern of gene variants associated with a body type, in which weight is deposited around the abdomen, rather than in the hips and thighs, increases the risk for type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease, as well as the incidence of several cardiovascular risk factors.
Flirting on the 'fly', what blow flies can tell us about attraction & dating apps
A study led by Simon Fraser University biologist Gerhard Gries found that the photoreceptors in blow fly eyes do more than help them navigate the environment.
Fossil discovery rewrites understanding of reproductive evolution
A remarkable 250-million-year-old 'terrible-headed lizard' fossil found in China shows an embryo inside the mother -- clear evidence for live birth.
NASA and MIT Collaborate to develop space-based quantum-dot spectrometer
A NASA technologist has teamed with the inventor of a new nanotechnology that could transform the way space scientists build spectrometers, the all-important device used by virtually all scientific disciplines to measure the properties of light emanating from astronomical objects, including Earth itself.
Gut feeling essential for migrating fish
Why do trout spend so much time in potentially dangerous estuaries before migrating to sea?
IDRI & NanoPass sign agreement to develop an intradermal rvRNA-based Zika virus vaccine
IDRI (Infectious Disease Research Institute) and NanoPass Technologies have signed a collaboration agreement to develop and test a new Zika vaccine based on a replicating viral RNA (rvRNA) construct administered intradermally using NanoPass's proprietary MicronJet600® microneedle device.
Two from UW-Madison contribute to human gene editing report
The National Academy of Sciences and National Academy of Medicine issued a report Tuesday focused on human genome editing.
Variable Tdp-43 cryptic exons between cell types
The Korea Brain Research Institute (President Kyung-jin Kim) announced on Wednesday Feb.
Scientists show 'matchmaker' role for protein behind SMA
Emory cell biologists have a detailed picture for what they think the SMN (survival of motor neurons) protein is doing, and how its deficiency causes problems in SMA patients' cells.
The heart of a far-off star beats for its planet
For the first time, astronomers from MIT and elsewhere have observed a star pulsing in response to its orbiting planet.
Researchers develop 'living diode' using cardiac muscle cells
Research from the University of Notre Dame brings scientists one step closer to developing new forms of biorobotics and novel treatment approaches for several muscle-related health problems such as muscular degenerative disorders, arrhythmia and limb loss.
Astronomers propose a cell phone search for galactic fast radio bursts
Fast radio bursts seem to come from distant galaxies, but there is no obvious reason that, every once in a while, an FRB wouldn't occur in our own Milky Way galaxy too.
Study finds that melatonin content of supplements varies widely
A new study suggests that the melatonin content of dietary supplements often varies widely from what is listed on the label.
Sick and tired -- not just a figure of speech
Already feeling drained so early in the year? Genes might contribute in a small but significant way to whether people report being tired and low in energy.
Research on dementia needs new approach say scientists at 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting
Nutrition researcher Neal D. Barnard, M.D., and other speakers at the American Association for the Advancement of Science's Annual Meeting call for a new approach to research on Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.
Beach bashing
Last year's El Niño resulted in unprecedented erosion of the Pacific coastline, according to research by marine scientist David Hubbard.
CIFAR at AAAS: Presentations by Canadian and international researchers
Here are summaries of research to be presented by CIFAR fellows at the 2017 AAAS meeting in Boston, Mass., from Feb.
Scientists reveal how the brain maintains useful memories
Researchers from the University of Toronto, Canada, have discovered a reason why we often struggle to remember the smaller details of past experiences.
A better way to swallow
To develop an improved screening method for dysphagia using high-resolution vibration and sound recordings, the National Science Foundation awarded a five-year, $549,139 CAREER Award to Ervin Sejdic at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering.
New delta Scuti: Rare pulsating star 7,000 light years away is 1 of only 7 in Milky Way
The newest delta Scuti (SKOO-tee) star in our night sky is so rare it's only one of seven identified by astronomers in the Milky Way.
Evidence of brain damage found in former soccer players
Evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a potential cause of dementia caused by repeated blows to the head, has been found in the brains of former association football (soccer) players.
Black hole is producing its own fuel for star-making
Scientists from MIT, the University of Cambridge, and elsewhere may have an answer.
Study of 52,000 men uncovers the genetics underlying male pattern baldness
A genomic study of baldness identified more than 200 genetic regions involved in this common but potentially embarrassing condition.
UTA researcher earns TxDOT contract to use geocells to improve pavement infrastructure
A researcher at The University of Texas at Arlington is working to determine the benefits of using recycled materials and geocells to improve Texas highways.
NASA eyes the heart of Tropical Cyclone Dineo on Valentine's Day
NASA's Terra satellite saw strong thunderstorms spiraling into the heart of Tropical Cyclone Dineo on Valentine's Day as it continued to strengthen in the Mozambique Channel.
New guideline provides clinical recommendations for specific insomnia drugs
A new clinical practice guideline is the first from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine to provide comprehensive, evidence-based analyses of individual agents commonly used in the treatment of chronic insomnia disorder.
Tiny magnetic implant offers new drug delivery method
University of British Columbia researchers have developed a magnetic drug implant -- the first of its kind in Canada -- that could offer an alternative for patients struggling with numerous pills or intravenous injections.
Researchers identify new process to raise natural armies of cancer-targeting T lymphocytes
Mayo Clinic and University of Washington researchers have discovered a new culture method that unlocks the natural fighter function of immune T cells when they are passing through the bloodstream.
AAAS forms partnership to expand access to high-quality scientific publishing
AAAS has announced that Science family journal authors funded by the Gates Foundation can publish their high-quality research open access.
Birmingham's early warning system flags global financial crises
Researchers at the University of Birmingham have developed a new 'early warning system' that could help policymakers around the world take action to avert or lessen the impact of financial crisis.
Joseph Moskal elected to medical and biological engineering elite
Northwestern University's Joseph R. Moskal has been elected to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering's (AIMBE) College of Fellows.
Graphene from soybeans
A breakthrough by CSIRO-led scientists has made the world's strongest material more commercially viable, thanks to the humble soybean.
Ancient fossil reveals first evidence of live birth in animals thought to lay eggs
The first ever evidence of live birth in an animal group previously thought to lay eggs exclusively has been discovered by an international team of scientists, including a palaeontologist from the University of Bristol.
Seeing the world through fresh eyes
New research provides insight into the development of zebrafish eyes using imaging and bioengineering techniques in live zebrafish embryos.
Scripps Florida collaboration awarded $3.3 million to develop next-generation breast cancer therapies
A pair of scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have been awarded up to $3.3 million from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to create the next generation of breast cancer treatments for the thousands of patients whose current treatment options are limited.
Traditional Chinese medicine in HIV cure issue of AIDS Research & Human Retroviruses
A special issue on progress toward a cure for HIV includes a description of a previously unreported study started in the early 2000s that describes AIDS patients currently ages 51-67 in good health.
USU chemist seeks 'game-changer' in electrochemical water catalysis
Utah State University chemist Yujie Sun is exploring a new oxidative process that would produce value-added organic products in the liquid phase, while simultaneously providing electrons for the production of hydrogen, which would be released in the gas phase.
Tumor-targeting system uses cancer's own mechanisms to betray its location
By hijacking a cancer cell's own metabolism, researchers have found a way to tag and target elusive cancers with small-molecule sugars.
Children of patients with C9orf72 mutations: Greater risk of frontotemporal dementia/ALS
The most common genetic cause of the brain diseases frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a mutation in the C9orf72 gene.
Cultivated scallops populations develop distinct genetic structure
The scallop is one of the largest edible molluscs, and gourmets consider it to be a great delicacy.
People can 'suppress' hay fever with three years of pollen pills or injections
Patients blighted by hay fever could markedly reduce symptoms for several years after a three-year course of treatment, but not after two years of treatment, researchers have found.
New infusion therapy may help smooth out movement for patients with Parkinson's
Constant infusion of a drug now used intermittently to 'rescue' patients with Parkinson's from bouts of immobility may also help avoid these debilitating symptoms and smooth out their movement throughout the day, physician-scientists say.
Scalp cooling device may help reduce hair loss for women with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy
Two studies in the Feb. 14 issue of JAMA examine hair loss among women with breast cancer who received scalp cooling before, during and after chemotherapy.
Cancer survivor and noted physician-scientist Sandra Horning to receive Roth Award
Sandra Horning, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and executive vice president of global development for Roche and Genentech, a member of the Roche Group, has been named the 2017 recipient of the Duane Roth Memorial Award, which will be presented Feb.
More serotonin, less motivation? It depends on the circumstances
Neuroscientists discovered a surprising and completely unexpected behavioral effect of serotonin in mice, which strongly suggests that this neurotransmitter is involved in a biological mechanism affecting motivation.
Ancient jars found in Judea reveal earth's magnetic field is fluctuating, not diminishing
Surprising new evidence derived from ancient ceramics proves that the Earth's geomagnetic force fluctuates -- not diminishes -- over time, Tel Aviv University researchers say.
Cardiovascular disease costs will exceed $1 trillion by 2035
A new study projects that by 2035, cardiovascular disease, the most costly and prevalent killer, if left unchecked, will place a crushing economic and health burden on the nation's financial and health care systems.
Graphene foam gets big and tough
Graphene foam reinforced with carbon nanotubes can hold thousands of times its own weight and still bounce back to its full height, according to Rice University scientists.
Black-hole-powered jets forge fuel for star formation
Astronomers using ALMA have discovered a surprising connection between a supermassive black hole and the galaxy where it resides.
'Tis better to give -- to your spouse
Psychologists have found that the emotional benefits of compassionate acts are significant for the giver, whether or not the recipient is even aware of the act.
Fructose consumption linked to the increase of liver disease among adolescents and children
Recent research suggests that dietary fructose intake may increase serum uric acid concentrations and that both uric acid concentration and fructose consumption may be increased in individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).
Ubiquitous and influential
Scientists at the University of Würzburg have generated new insights into the intricate molecular underpinnings of ubiquitin signaling.
Don't kill the messenger RNA
Success of new protein-making therapy for hemophilia opens door for treating many other diseases.
Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea
Researchers from University of Gothenburg and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) show that both species diversity and habitat diversity are critical to understand the functioning of ecosystems.
Limited evidence that styrene causes cancer
In 2011, the styrene, a high volume plastics chemical and animal carcinogen, was the focal point in a 'poison scandal' in the Danish media; but now a registry study of more than 72,000 employees from more than 400 companies that have been exposed to styrene during production of glassfibre reinforced plastics, has not found an increased incidence of a wide range of cancer types.
Just press print: New study shows how 3-D printing at home saves big bucks
New study from Michigan Technological University shows that consumers who invest in an at-home 3-D printer can not only make their money back within six months, but may also see an almost 1,000 percent return on their investment over a five-year period.
Technology puts 'touch' into long-distance relationships
Long-distance couples can share a walk, watch movies together, and even give each other a massage, using new technologies being developed in Carman Neustaedter's Simon Fraser University lab.
A new technique for creation of entangled photon states developed
Members of the Faculty of Physics, the Lomonosov Moscow State University have elaborated a new technique for creation of entangled photon states, exhibiting photon pairs, which get correlated (interrelated) with each other.
Genes in albino orchids may hold clue to mechanism for non-photosynthetic parasites
How do plants give up photosynthesis and become parasites? A research team in Japan are using comprehensive analysis of gene expression in albino and green orchids to investigate the evolution of parasitic plants.
Level up and learn: Team teaches science through video game
In an article recently published in Nature Chemistry, a University of Texas at Dallas team -- including a materials scientist, two chemists and a game design expert -- describes how a group of 39 college students from diverse majors played an enhanced version of the popular video game 'Minecraft' and learned chemistry in the process, despite being given no in-class science instruction.
Finding fault: USU geologist probes earthquake history of Utah's Wasatch Fault
Utah State University geologist Alexis Ault is exploring processes that cause earthquakes in Utah's Wasatch Fault down to the nano-scale.
Reactive lignin for reducing the environmental impacts of wood products
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed technology known as 'CatLignin' to produce reactive lignin from pulp industry side streams to be used as a replacement for toxic phenol compounds in wood adhesives that are widely used in wood products and furniture.
ARRS 2017 Annual Meeting open to media
With educational activities representing the entire spectrum of radiology, the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) will host leading radiologists from around the world at the ARRS 2017 Annual Meeting, April 30-May 5 in New Orleans, LA.
Study confirms key therapeutic advance for children living with HIV and tuberculosis
Landmark study proves that 'super-boosting' approach counters negative interaction between key HIV and TB drugs The non-profit research and development organization Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) has released results of a study in South Africa that will make it easier for healthcare workers to treat children living with HIV who are co-infected with tuberculosis (TB).
'Field patterns' as a new mathematical object
University of Utah mathematicians propose a theoretical framework to understand how waves and other disturbances move through materials in conditions that vary in both space and time.
Kalinin, Paranthaman elected Materials Research Society fellows
Two researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sergei Kalinin and Mariappan Parans Paranthaman, have been elected fellows of the Materials Research Society.
Optimizing data center placement and network design to strengthen cloud computing
Telecommunication experts estimate the amount of data stored 'in the cloud' or in remote data centers around the world, will quintuple in the next five years.
Better health for women involved in clinical trials
Women who participate in obstetric and gynecology clinical trials experience improved health outcomes compared to those who are not involved in trials, according to research by Queen Mary University of London.
NTU and FireEye join forces to grow the ranks of Singapore's cyber security experts
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and leading cyber security company FireEye are inking a partnership to explore new areas in cyber security research, and to develop courses to meet the rising demand for cyber security professionals needed to help defend critical networks.
Joslin Diabetes Center participating in 2 NIH-funded artificial pancreas clinical trials
Joslin Diabetes Center will take part in two clinical trials this year to test artificial pancreas systems designed to automatically monitor and regulate blood glucose levels in people with type 1 diabetes, which would replace traditional methods of managing the disease such as testing blood glucose levels by finger stick or using continuous glucose monitoring systems with separate, non-integrated delivery of insulin by either injections or a pump.
Moral distress in health care -- Special report outlines strategies to increase moral resilience
Nurses in all roles and specialties face complex ethical situations that challenge their values, giving rise to moral distress.
The Lancet: Religious leaders could help improve uptake of male circumcision in HIV-prevention effort
Educating religious leaders about how circumcision helps to prevent HIV infection increased the number of men being circumcised in Tanzania, according to a study published in The Lancet.
High-res biomolecule imaging
Tiny defects in diamonds known as nitrogen vacancy defects could lead to high-resolution images of the structure of biological molecules, according to a new study by MIT researchers.
NASA to launch Raven to develop autonomous rendezvous capability
Launching soon for the International Space Station will be a technology module called Raven.
Your brain's got rhythm
Salk scientists create synthetic brain systems called 'circuitoids' to better understand dysfunctional movements in Parkinson's, ALS and other diseases.
To please your friends, tell them what they already know
We love to tell friends and family about experiences we've had and they haven't -- from exotic vacations to celebrity sightings -- but new research suggests that these stories don't thrill them quite as much as we imagine.
Researchers identify phosphorylation process vital to cancer growth
Scientists at VIB-KU Leuven have identified a new mechanism that impacts tumor growth.
Only a limited HIV subset moves from mother to child, study shows
In the transmission of HIV-1 from mother to child only a subset of a mother's viruses infects their infants either in utero or via breastfeeding, and the viruses that are transmitted depend on whether transmission occurs during pregnancy or through breastfeeding
Turning up the heat for perfect (nano)diamonds
For use in quantum sensing, the bulk nanodiamond crystal surrounding the point defect must be highly perfect.
USU scientist explores 'big picture' of hydrologic modeling for water resources management
Using water resources systems analysis and physical geography, Utah State University researcher Sarah Null is developing mathematical models to explore processes and interactions of both built and natural water systems.
New metalloid oxide reducing bacteria found in Manitoba's Nopiming gold mine tailings
A new study published in the Canadian Journal of Microbiology has identified new toxic metalloid-reducing bacteria in highly polluted abandoned gold mine tailings in Manitoba's Nopiming Provincial Park.
Kurt Gottfried receives 2016 AAAS Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award
Dr. Kurt Gottfried, a recognized leader in the scientific community on missile defense and nuclear terrorism, has been awarded the 2016 Scientific Freedom and Responsibility Award from the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Study: Long-term eelgrass loss due to joint effects of shade, heat
A new study led by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science links a long-term decline in Chesapeake Bay's eelgrass beds to both deteriorating water quality and rising summertime temperatures.
Study rewrites the history of corn in corn country
A new study contradicts decades of thought, research and teaching on the history of corn cultivation in the American Bottom, a floodplain of the Mississippi River in Illinois.
Pilot project offers blueprint for addressing mental health needs of homeless children
A research team led by North Carolina State University outlines the lessons learned in a five-year pilot project that was designed to help meet the mental health needs of children in homeless families -- and could serve as a blueprint for similar efforts around the country.
Ventura fault could cause stronger shaking, new research finds
A new study by a team of researchers, including one from UC Riverside, found that the fault under Ventura, Calif., would likely cause stronger shaking during an earthquake and more damage than previously suspected.
Shock from heart device often triggers further health care needs
Shock from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may trigger an increase in health care needs for many patients, regardless whether the shock was appropriate needed or not.
Smoking cessation counseling successful when paired with lung cancer screening
The first successful randomized trial of its kind provides preliminary evidence that telephone-based smoking cessation counseling given to smokers shortly after undergoing lung cancer screening can be effective at helping people stop smoking.
Lipid nanoparticles for gene therapy
Twenty-five years have passed since the publication of the first work on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) as a system for delivering drugs.
Researchers unravel how ticks protect themselves from Lyme bacteria and other microbes
For hundreds of millions of years, ticks have survived on Earth by sucking blood from their victims for days, often leaving behind terrible diseases as a thank-you note.
Using a simple, scalable method, a material that can be used as a sensor is developed
By making use of a source of cellulose, such as newspapers, and sugar to synthesise carbon nanoparticles, researchers in the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry have developed a material that could be used as a sensor as its components respond to various stimuli.
Salk scientist awarded inaugural Sjöberg Prize for cancer breakthrough
Salk Professor Tony Hunter, who holds an American Cancer Society Professorship, has been awarded $500,000 as part of the $1 million Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences' inaugural Sjöberg Prize for Cancer Research.
NASA's OSIRIS-REx takes its first image of Jupiter
This image was taken at 3:38 a.m. EST on Feb.
Learning how to fine-tune nanofabrication
Researchers developed a new computational method that may be used to produce tiny wires with diameters 1/100,000th that of a piece of hair, or tiny electrical circuits that can fit on the tip of a needle.
A nanofiber matrix for healing
A new nanofiber-on-microfiber matrix could help produce more and better quality stem cells for disease treatment and regenerative therapies.
Radiation therapy continues to be gold standard to palliate painful bone metastases
The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) recently published an updated clinical guideline that underscores the safety and effectiveness of palliative radiation therapy (RT) for treating painful bone metastases.
Delinquent youth have more high-risk sex HIV/AIDS behaviors as they age
Delinquent youth are more likely to have high-risk HIV/AIDS sexual behaviors as they age, including multiple sexual partners and unprotected vaginal sex with a high-risk partner, reports a Northwestern Medicine study.
Immune cell study prompts rethink on how to tackle infections
Fresh insights into how immune cells are regulated could signal a new approach to tackling infections.
Communicating health risks in a post-truth world
Public officials faced with the tough task of communicating risk on contentious issues like vaccination or fluoridation -- where the actual risk is low but public concern remains high -- need to show that they care, demonstrate that they are taking action and strategically engage with the media.
Biological experiments become transparent -- anywhere, any time
Biological experiments are generating increasingly large and complex sets of data.
Sugar, salt, and fat taxes could save billions in health care costs
Australia could save AUD $3.4 billion (USD $2.3 billion) in healthcare costs over the remaining lifetimes of all Australians alive in 2010 by instituting a combination of taxes on unhealthy foods and subsidies on fruits and vegetables, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine by Linda Cobiac, from the University of Melbourne, Australia and colleagues.
CU Boulder researchers develop brain model to quantify pain beyond sensory input
Scientists are just beginning to study the complex cerebral processes behind pain, and in a promising step forward, University of Colorado Boulder researchers have developed a functional MRI-based model that identifies brain activity patterns involved in varied pain experience, even when the input from the body is held constant.
Shorter course of immunotherapy does not improve symptoms of allergic rhinitis long-term
Among patients with moderate to severe seasonal allergic rhinitis, two years of immunotherapy tablets was not significantly different from placebo in improving nasal symptoms at 3-year follow-up, according to a study appearing in the Feb.
Youth flag football may not be safer than tackle football
University of Iowa Health Care researchers report that the results of a study of injury rates in youth football leagues did not show that flag football is safer than tackle football.

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