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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 18, 2017


How to build a bio-bot: Researchers share design and development of biological machines
Creating tiny muscle-powered robots that can walk or swim by themselves -- or better yet, when prompted -- is more complicated than it looks.
Researcher examines premature death in delinquent youth
Northwestern University researcher Linda Teplin will share data showing alarming premature mortality rates for delinquent youth at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Boston.
Communications expert explains how science should respond to fake news
The rise of fake news has dominated the world of politics since the last US election cycle.
GA4GH at AAAS 2017
The Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH), an international coalition of academic, industry, and patient groups that aims to foster a culture of data-sharing between researchers and clinicians, will host a symposium in the Medical Sciences and Public Health track of the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) on Feb.
Study shows China's severe weather patterns changing drastically since 1960
In one of the most comprehensive studies on trends in local severe weather patterns to date, an international team of researchers found that the frequency of hail storms, thunderstorms and high wind events has decreased by nearly 50 percent on average throughout China since 1960.
Examining exploding stars through the atomic nucleus
Imagine being able to view microscopic aspects of a classical nova, a massive stellar explosion on the surface of a white dwarf star (about as big as Earth), in a laboratory rather than from afar via a telescope.
Maize study finds genes that help crops adapt to change
A new study analyzed close to 4,500 maize varieties to identify more than 1,000 genes driving large-scale adaptation to the environment.
Smart reforms key to global fish recovery, even with climate change
New research finds that climate change will cause dramatic impacts in the world's fisheries, but with effective management most fisheries could yield more fish and more prosperity, even with a changing climate.
Invitation: Global warming to cause dramatic changes in fisheries
New research from scientists and economists at the University of California Santa Barbara, Oregon State University and Environmental Defense Fund identifies the dramatic future impacts of climate change on the world's fisheries and how fishing reforms are vital to sustaining the global seafood supply.
Scholar to talk about role of science in law
Northwestern Pritzker School of Law's Shari Diamond, one of the foremost empirical researchers on jury process and legal decision-making, will address the importance of involving scientists in the legal system at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Boston.
Three-way dance between herbivores, plants and microbes unveiled
What looks like a caterpillar chewing on a leaf or a beetle consuming fruit is likely a three-way battle that benefits most, if not all of the players involved, according to a Penn State entomologist.
Reboot Gitmo for science
How do you redeem a place like Gitmo, the notorious US military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba?
The secret of scientists who impact policy
Researchers analyzed 15 policy decisions worldwide, with outcomes ranging from new coastal preservation laws to improved species protections, to produce the first quantitative analysis of how environmental knowledge impacts the attitudes and decisions of conservation policymakers.

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Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...