Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | February 24, 2017


Princeton-Intel collaboration breaks new ground in studies of the brain
Princeton University and Intel researchers have collaborated to develop software that allows for 'decoding digital brain data' to reveal how neural activity gives rise to learning, memory and other cognitive functions.
Antibiotics used to treat cystic fibrosis increases risk of permanent hearing loss
A powerful class of antibiotics provides life-saving relief for people with cystic fibrosis; however, a new study for the first time reveals the levels at which high cumulative dosages over time significantly increases the risk of permanent hearing loss in these patients.
In enemy garb
Biologists expand on more than 150 years of textbook wisdom with a new explanation for wasp mimicry.
Bristol and BT collaborate on massive MIMO trials for 5G wireless
The quest for highly efficient 5G wireless connectivity has been given a boost thanks to a collaboration between a team of 5G engineers from the Universities of Bristol and Lund, National Instruments (NI), and BT, one of the world's leading providers of communications services.
Study shows ancient humans arrived in South America in multiple waves
The findings published Wednesday (Feb. 22, 2017) in the journal Science Advances suggest that Paleoamericans share a last common ancestor with modern native South Americans outside, rather than inside, the Americas and underscore the importance of looking at both genetic and morphological evidence, each revealing different aspects of the human story, to help unravel our species' history.
New antiviral drug cuts cytomegalovirus infection and improves survival in patients
In a significant advance in improving the safety of donor stem cell transplants, a major clinical trial led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has shown that a novel agent can protect against the most common viral infection that patients face after transplantation.
Cosmic blast from the past
Three decades ago, a massive stellar explosion sent shockwaves not only through space but also through the astronomical community.
High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats
A study from Stockholm University has now established what was previously suspected, that the high levels of brominated flame retardants measured in cats are from the dust in our homes.
Experience graphene mobile innovation at the GSMA Mobile World Congress
Graphene is back at Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2017 with the Graphene Experience Zone.
Antibiotic resistance: A burgeoning problem for kids too
In a new, first-of-its-kind study, researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have found a 700 percent surge in infections caused by bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family resistant to multiple kinds of antibiotics among children in the US.
New pop-up strategy inspired by cuts, not folds
Origami-inspired materials use folds in materials to embed powerful functionality.
New structural studies reveal workings of a molecular pump that ejects cancer drugs
Sometimes cells spit out things we don't want them to -- like medications.
New York schools help Cornell monitor local waterways for invasive species
With 7,600 lakes and 70,000 miles of creeks and rivers to monitor, Cornell researchers struggled to stay ahead of round goby and other invasive species -- until they tapped into New York's network of teachers looking to bring science alive for their students.
New algorithm identifies gene transfers between different bacterial species
In a recent study combining machine learning and bioinformatics, a new computational method was developed for modelling gene transfers between different lineages of a bacterial population or even between entirely different bacterial species.
38,000-year-old engravings confirm ancient origins of technique used by Seurat, Van Gogh
A newly discovered trove of 16 engraved and otherwise modified limestone blocks, created 38,000 years ago, confirms the ancient origins of the pointillist techniques later adopted by 19th and 20th century artists such as Georges Seurat, Vincent Van Gogh, Camille Pissarro, and Roy Lichtenstein.
Two types of sensors that provide information on vineyard water status are designed
Researchers at the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre have designed two types of sensors whose technologies allow information on the water status of the vineyard to be obtained by means of innovative methods.
Men with higher cognitive ability better at taking heart medication
After a heart attack, it is important for patients to take medication that lowers cholesterol levels.
Miniature device is 3 times more efficient in generating new colors of laser pulses
A group of researchers from the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw has just published the results of their works on miniature device -- a tripler -- for generating femtosecond laser pulses in the UV.
Alzheimer's drug prescribed off-label could pose risk for some
Donepezil, a medication that is approved to treat people with Alzheimer's disease, should not be prescribed for people with mild cognitive impairment without a genetic test.
Study offers guidance on how to protect olive trees from being ravaged by deadly pathogen
Expert ecologists at the UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) have devised a scientific model which could help predict the spread of the deadly Xylella fastidiosa which is threatening to destroy Europe's olive trees.
In first, scientists forecast West Nile Virus outbreaks
Scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health are the first to report a method to accurately predict the timing and intensity of West Nile Virus (WNV) outbreaks.
Effects of a poor diet during pregnancy may be reversed in female adolescent offspring
Here's some good news if you are female: Research published online in The FASEB Journal, shows that in mice, what is eaten during adolescence or childhood development may alter long-term behavior and learning, and can even 'rescue' females from the negative effects on behavior resulting from a poor maternal diet during pregnancy.
Reverse genetics for rotavirus
Osaka University scientists generate a new plasmid-based reverse genetics system for rotaviruses.
Pitt study provides clues to relationship between schizophrenia and rheumatoid arthritis
Bioinformatics study identifies genetic variants with differing effects on risk of rheumatoid arthritis and schizophrenia.
What effect does prenatal and postpartum maternal depression have on children?
The results of a large study do not support the notion that prenatal and postpartum maternal depression is particularly detrimental to children's psychological development.
Controversial test could be leading to unnecessary open heart operations
A University of Leicester researcher leads an aortic stenosis study.
Study catalogs the complex flavors of American-made goat cheese
Researchers generated a flavor lexicon that lists the 39 flavor attributes in cheeses made with goat milk.
Elevated stress levels among Norway's youngest in childcare
Norwegian researchers measured the stress hormone cortisol in 112 toddlers from 85 different childcare centers in six municipalities, approximately five months after they started attending.
Never too late: Reaping the benefits of exercise in early postmenopause
Women recently postmenopause have similar or improved benefits from physical activity, in terms of muscle and blood vessel function, as those premenopause.
Study shows adipose stem cells may be the cell of choice for therapeutic applications
An international team of researchers, funded by Morris Animal Foundation, has shown that adipose (fat) stem cells might be the preferred stem cell type for use in canine therapeutic applications, including orthopedic diseases and injury.
Study examines ways to use demand information to adjust capacity
A new UT Dallas study derived optimal policies and data-driven, problem-solving techniques for firms to learn about demand so that they can decide when and by how much they should adjust their capacity level.
New U-M study shows how bacteria get into the lungs; findings could help disease research
New research pinpoints just how bacteria get into human lungs, and opens the door to more research on what happens to them -- and our bodies -- as a result of the lung microbiome.
Getting rid of the last bits of sulfur in fuel
A new technique could help scrub the last traces of sulfur from diesel and gas.
Mild cognitive impairment (MCI)
Greek researchers demonstrated the potential of a self-administered virtual supermarket cognitive training game for remotely detecting mild cognitive impairment (MCI), without the need for an examiner, among a sample of older adults.
More Earth-like than moon-like
Mars' mantle may be more complicated than previously thought. In a new study published today in the Nature-affiliated journal Scientific Reports, researchers at LSU document geochemical changes over time in the lava flows of Elysium, a major martian volcanic province.
NASA's Webb Telescope team prepares for earsplitting acoustic test
Inside NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., the James Webb Space Telescope team completed the environmental portion of vibration testing and prepared for the acoustic test on the telescope.
New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half
Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilised nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.
Nano-sized hydrogen storage system increases efficiency
Lawrence Livermore scientists have collaborated with an interdisciplinary team of researchers including colleagues from Sandia National Laboratories to develop an efficient hydrogen storage system that could be a boon for hydrogen powered vehicles.
Evidence review supports pediatric use of PDE-5 inhibitors for pulmonary hypertension
A systematic review of the comparative effectiveness and safety of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors in pediatric patients with pulmonary hypertension published Feb.
New risk factors for anxiety disorders
Several newly discovered variants of a gene increase the risk of developing anxiety disorders.
Can staying active help to prevent chronic pain? Physical activity affects pain modulation in older adults
Older adults with higher levels of physical activity have pain modulation patterns that might help lower their risk of developing chronic pain, reports a study in PAIN®, the official publication of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP).
Novel 'barcode' tracking of T cells in immunotherapy patients identifies likely cancer-
A new discovery by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle makes an important step in identifying which specific T cells within the diverse army of a person's immune system are best suited to fight cancer.
Decoding the genome's cryptic language
Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new tool to identify RNA-DNA interactions.
NSF Law and Social Sciences program issues new awards
The grants support research into crucial social issues.
Teach yourself everyday happiness with imagery training
In a recently published paper in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, scientists at the Smartbrain Clinic in Oslo, Norway find that self-guided positive imagery training can successfully combat negative emotions in our daily lives.
Sandia uses confined nanoparticles to improve hydrogen storage materials performance
Sometimes, you have to go small to win big. That is the approach a multilab, interdisciplinary team took in using nanoparticles and a novel nanoconfinement system to develop a method to change hydrogen storage properties.
Size matters... and structure too! New tool predicts the interaction of proteins and RNA
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation developed Global Score, a method that allows, for the first time, to predict protein interactions with long non-coding RNAs.
Tokyo Tech and Input Output HK create the Cryptocurrency Collaborative Research Chair
On Feb. 15, Input Output Hong Kong, and its Japanese subsidiary Input Output Japan, and Tokyo Institute of Technology created the Input Output Cryptocurrency Collaborative Research Chair within the Tokyo Tech School of Computing.
Penn vet team identifies new therapeutic targets for tropical disease leishmaniasis
Each year, about 2 million people contract leishmaniasis, which results in disfiguring skin ulcers that may take months or years to heal and in rare cases can become metastatic, causing major tissue damage.
Hammerhead shark migration gives new hope for conservation
Great Hammerhead sharks have been tagged and tracked across the USA and Bahamas in a bid to shed light on their migration habits.
Many genetic changes can occur early in human development
Multiple genetic changes can occur before or early after conception.
The making of music
A new study suggests that music -- and specifically infant-directed song -- evolved as a way for parents to signal to children that their needs are being met, while still freeing up parents to perform other tasks, like foraging for food, or caring for other offspring.
Molecular 'on switch' could point to treatments for pediatric brain tumor
Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have identified a mechanism that controls the expression of genes regulating the growth of the most aggressive form of medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor.
The potential consequences for cancer care and cancer research of Brexit
Cancer leaders highlight main fears for patient care, treatment and research in a post-Brexit world.
Dean at UC Riverside receives 2017 Insight Into Diversity Magazine Giving Back Award
Deborah Deas, M.D., M.P.H, the Mark and Pam Rubin Dean and Chief Executive Office for Clinical Affairs at the University of California, Riverside School of Medicine, has received the 2017 Giving Back Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the oldest and largest diversity and inclusion publication in higher education.
How proteins reshape cell membranes
Small 'bubbles' frequently form on membranes of cells and are taken up into their interior.
Funding for study which could lead to new drug treatment for dementia diseases
Scientists from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry have received funding of more than £58,500 from BRACE, a charity which supports research into Alzheimer's disease, for a pilot study to investigate how a failure in our cells' 'recycling center' could hold the key to new drug therapies for dementia diseases such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.
Study reports multidrug resistant bacteria found in hospital sinks
Many recent reports have found multidrug resistant bacteria living in hospital sink drainpipes, putting them in close proximity to vulnerable patients.
Regular aerobic exercise beginning in middle age may lessen severity of stroke in old age
Regular aerobic exercise may protect the collateral circulation and lessen the severity of strokes later in life.
A novel DNA vaccine design improves chances of inducing anti-tumor immunity
Scientists at The Wistar Institute and Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. have devised a novel DNA vaccine approach through molecular design to improve the immune responses elicited against one of the most important cancer antigen targets.
The dawn of a new era for Supernova 1987a
Three decades ago, astronomers spotted one of the brightest exploding stars in more than 400 years.
Tissue-engineered model developed to study bone-invading tumor
Researchers have used tissue engineering to create models for studying the bone-destroying activity of tumors such as the aggressive pediatric cancer Ewing's sarcoma.
Dietary prebiotics improve sleep, buffer impacts of stress, says study
New research suggests that lesser-known gut-health promoters called prebiotics -- which serve as food for good bacteria inside the gut -- can also have an impact, improving sleep and buffering the physiological impacts of stress.
Watching birds near your home is good for your mental health -- official
People living in neighborhoods with more birds, shrubs and trees are less likely to suffer from depression, anxiety and stress, according to research by academics at the University of Exeter, the British Trust for Ornithology and the University of Queensland.
Interactive health apps may inspire healthy behaviors, but watch the tone
Just like real doctors and nurses, online health tools with good -- but controlled -- communication skills can promote healthier lifestyles, according to researchers.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#SB2 2019 Science Birthday Minisode: Mary Golda Ross
Our second annual Science Birthday is here, and this year we celebrate the wonderful Mary Golda Ross, born 9 August 1908. She died in 2008 at age 99, but left a lasting mark on the science of rocketry and space exploration as an early woman in engineering, and one of the first Native Americans in engineering. Join Rachelle and Bethany for this very special birthday minisode celebrating Mary and her achievements. Thanks to our Patreons who make this show possible! Read more about Mary G. Ross: Interview with Mary Ross on Lash Publications International, by Laurel Sheppard Meet Mary Golda...