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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 14, 2017


Study: Most athletic patients return to sports, highly satisfied with ACL reconstruction
A study at Hospital for Special Surgery finds that most athletic patients who have reconstructive surgery for a torn ACL are highly satisfied with the procedure and able to return to sports.
Increase in extreme sea levels could endanger European coastal communities
Massive coastal flooding in northern Europe that now occurs once every century could happen every year if greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise, according to a new study.
Nearly all shoulder replacement patients under age 55 return to sports
A new study being presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), found that 96.4 percent of recreational athletes, age 55 and younger, who underwent total shoulder replacement surgery returned to at least one sport, on average, within seven months of surgery.
New model explains the formation of supermassive black holes in the very early universe
Simulations performed using supercomputers demonstrate that the radiation from nearby galaxies can facilitate the formation of supermassive black hole seeds in nearby gas clouds.
Probiotics may not always be a silver bullet for better health
UNSW Sydney researchers have investigated the impact of probiotics on gut health and cognitive function.
Low levels of 'anti-anxiety' hormone linked to postpartum depression
In a small-scale study of women with previously diagnosed mood disorders, Johns Hopkins researchers report that lower levels of the hormone allopregnanolone in the second trimester of pregnancy were associated with an increased chance of developing postpartum depression in women already known to be at risk for the disorder.
International Harrington Prize in Medicine jointly awarded to three recipients
The fourth annual Harrington Prize for Innovation in Medicine has been jointly awarded to Daniel J.
IU Center for Aging Research develops novel ICU delirium severity assessment tool
The Indiana University Center for Aging Research has developed and validated a novel easy-to-administer tool to score and track delirium severity in the ICU, enabling clinicians to make better decisions about the brain health of ICU patients.
Zebrafish without stripes
Dowling-Degos disease is a hereditary pigmentation disorder that generally progresses harmlessly.
Study: Cold climates and ocean carbon sequestration
A new study suggests that efficient nutrient consumption by plankton in the Southern Ocean drove carbon sequestration in the deep ocean during the ice ages.
The chemistry of redheads (video)
The thing that sets redheads apart from the crowd is pigmentation.
Study identifies modifiable risk factors for elbow injuries in baseball pitchers
Elbow injuries continue to be on the rise in baseball players, especially pitchers, yet little is known about the actual variables that influence these injuries.
The fashion industry gains new tools to reduce its environmental load
The environmental impact of our clothing has now been mapped in the most comprehensive life cycle analysis performed to date.
Low accuracy found for tests used to predict risk of spontaneous preterm birth for women who have not given birth before
The use of two measures, fetal fibronectin (a protein) levels and transvaginal cervical length, had low predictive accuracy for spontaneous preterm birth among women who have not given birth before, according to a study appearing in the March 14 issue of JAMA.
Beyond excellence
Parisi will present the key points of his vision of research policy during an event planned for March 17 at SISSA in Trieste.
Reducing radiation could safely cut breast cancer treatment costs
Over half of older women with early stage breast cancer received more radiation therapy than what might be medically necessary, adding additional treatment and health care costs, according to a study led by Duke Cancer Institute researchers.
Recommendations developed to reduce radiation exposure in pediatric orthopedic patients
A new analysis looks at the available evidence on radiation exposure in medical imaging in pediatric orthopaedic care and provides recommendations aimed at optimizing decision-making to reduce unnecessary exposure.
Study finds little consistency in doctor reviews on three physician rating websites
When looking for a doctor, many consumers turn to websites that post physician ratings and reviews.
The Lancet: The weaponisation of health care: Using people's need for health care as a weapon of war over six years of Syrian conflict
Marking six years since the start of the Syrian conflict (15 March), a study in The Lancet provides new estimates for the number of medical personnel killed: 814 from March 2011 to February 2017.
Bonding chips using inkjet printers
A team of researchers at the University of Barcelona have demonstrated a new bonding technique for surface mounted devices that uses an inkjet printer with ink that incorporates silver nanoparticles.
Researchers create model of anorexia nervosa using stem cells
An international research team, led by scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, has created the first cellular model of anorexia nervosa (AN), reprogramming induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from adolescent females with the eating disorder.
Ebola vaccines provide immune responses after 1 year
Immune responses to Ebola vaccines at one year after vaccination are examined in a new study appearing in the March 14 issue of JAMA.
Leap onto land saves fish from being eaten
Fish on the South Pacific island of Rarotonga have evolved the ability to survive out of water and leap about on the rocky shoreline because this helps them escape predators in the ocean.
Encouragement to consult GPs for memory concerns did not ensure earlier dementia diagnosis
Encouraging patients with potential memory deficits to seek early advice from a general practitioner (GP) empowered more of them to consult their GP, but GPs did not change their behavior and refer more to memory services or for earlier overall diagnosis of dementia, according to a trial publishing this week in PLOS Medicine by Gill Livingston, of University College London, and colleagues.
Did humans create the Sahara desert?
New research investigating the transition of the Sahara from a lush, green landscape 10,000 years ago to the arid conditions found today, suggests that humans may have played an active role in its desertification.
DDW® 2017 offers reporters access to leading research in digestive health
Digestive Disease Week® (DDW) returns to Chicago, Ill., from May 6-9, 2017, bringing together physicians, researchers and academics from across the world.
Streamlining the measurement of phonon dispersion
Researchers in Jülich, Germany have adapted an instrument used for High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (HREELS) with new components so that the phonon dispersion of a given material can be measured in a matter of minutes.
Unconventional: The Development of Natural Gas from the Marcellus Shale
Shale gas has changed thinking about fossil energy supplies worldwide, but the development of these resources has been controversial.
Defect in non-coding DNA might trigger brain disorders such as severe language impairment
Genetic variation in the non-coding DNA could give rise to language impairments in children and other neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism, and bipolar disorder, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and Radboud University in Nijmegen found.
For surgeons in the OR, a way to fight bad posture
Surgeons face psychological stress. Less understood is the physical stress they endure from spending hours in awkward positions in the operating room.
Benchmark database of lifespan-extending drugs announced
Scientists announced the benchmark database of lifespan-extending drugs encompassing 418 compounds with lifespan-extension data across 27 different model organisms, revealing that the majority of age-related pathways have yet to be targeted pharmacologically.
Most atrial fibrillation patients don't get preventive drug before stroke
More than 80 percent of stroke patients with a history of atrial fibrillation either received not enough or no anticoagulation therapy prior to having a stroke, despite the drugs' proven record of reducing stroke risk, according to a Duke Clinical Research Institute study.
NIH scientists deploy CRISPR to preserve photoreceptors in mice
Silencing a gene called Nrl in mice prevents the loss of cells from degenerative diseases of the retina, according to a new study.
Study quantifies effect of 'legacy phosphorus' in reduced water quality
For decades, phosphorous has accumulated in Wisconsin soils. Though farmers have taken steps to reduce the quantity of the agricultural nutrient applied to and running off their fields, a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveals that a 'legacy' of abundant soil phosphorus in the Yahara watershed of Southern Wisconsin has a large, direct and long-lasting impact on water quality.
25 million US women lack access to infertility services, Pitt study shows
New research from the University of Pittsburgh found that nearly 40 percent of reproductive-aged women in the US have limited or no nearby access to assisted reproductive technology clinics.
New study identifies ancient shark ancestors
New research based on x-ray imaging provides the strongest evidence to date that sharks arose from a group of bony fishes called acanthodians.
Scientists say they are a step closer to solving chronic bladder diseases
Scientists have begun to unlock the genetic code to understand how the lining of the bladder functions as a barrier to store urine -- paving the way for possible new treatments for chronic bladder diseases such as interstitial cystitis and cancer.
Common tests for preterm birth not useful for routine screening of first-time pregnancies
Two methods thought to hold promise in predicting preterm delivery in first-time pregnancies identified only a small proportion of cases and do not appear suitable for widespread screening, according to a large study by a National Institutes of Health research network.
Acetone experiences Leidenfrost effect, no hotplate needed
Researchers in Japan noticed that acetone droplets not mixing with the water, because of their own form of the Leidenfrost effect, more commonly observed in water droplets on solid hot surfaces.
Underuse of anti-clotting therapies common among patients with atrial fibrillation who have a stroke
Inadequate use of anticoagulation therapies was prevalent among patients with atrial fibrillation who experienced a stroke, according to a study appearing in the March 14 issue of JAMA.
Flies and bees act like plant cultivators
Pollinator insects accelerate plant evolution, but a plant changes in different ways depending on the pollinator.
Micro-organisms will help African farmers: Soil microbes to the rescue
Sorghum is the fifth most important cereal in the world.
Nearly half of today's high school athletes specialize in one sport
Youth single sport specialization -- training and playing just one sport, often year round and on multiple teams -- is a growing phenomenon in the US A new study presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), found that 45 percent of high school athletes specialize in just one sport, two years earlier than current collegiate and professional athletes say they did.
Researchers develop technique to track yellow fever virus replication
Researchers from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have developed a new method that can precisely track the replication of yellow fever virus in individual host immune cells.
World's oldest plant-like fossils discovered
Scientists at the Swedish Museum of Natural History have found fossils of 1.6 billion-year-old probable red algae.
Rethinking the use of warnings with transcript and video evidence in trials
New research from the University of Liverpool examining the impact multiple forms of evidence has on juror perceptions during criminal trials has found the use of video material could be detrimental without the use of a judicial warning.
Breathtaking gene discovery in Dalmatian dogs
University of Helsinki researchers have uncovered a novel gene associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome in dogs.
Home may be the best place to recover after total joint replacement surgery
Despite higher costs, many doctors recommend and some patients prefer, recovery at an in-patient rehabilitation facility following total hip (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR) surgery.
Buzzing the brain with electricity can boost working memory
Scientists have uncovered a method for improving short-term working memory, by stimulating the brain with electricity to synchronize brain waves.
Portable 3-D ultrasound will enable fieldside, roadside screening of head injury
The thin, flexible sheath that protects and insulates our optic nerve is also a window into whether we've had a head injury.
Scientists discover hydrothermal vents on deep ocean voyage
Barbara John and her husband, Michael Cheadle, both UW professors of geology and geophysics, recently co-led a research expedition aboard the US Research Vessel Atlantis.
Shared doctor-patient orthopaedic treatment decisions improve outcomes, patient experience
Well-informed patients who decide with their orthopaedic surgeon what treatment is best for them have better outcomes and higher patient satisfaction rates, according to new study presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).
Epigenetic alteration a promising new drug target for heroin use disorder
The past few years have seen an explosion of heroin abuse and deaths from overdose.
'Going deep' to measure Earth's rotational effects
Researchers in Italy hope to measure Earth's rotation using a laser-based gyroscope housed deep underground, with enough experimental precision to reveal measurable effects of Einstein's general theory of relativity.
New platform for culturing stem cells
A powerful new tool combines micro- and nanotechnologies to precisely control stem cell culturing environment.
Yuan Chang and Patrick Moore win prize for the discovery of two cancer viruses
Scientists looking for new tumor viruses have to keep an eye out for the virus genes rather than the viral particles.
Location of spinal correction influences risk of PJK development
A new study reports for the first time that PJK risk following lumbar spinal fusion depends on the level of the spine fused.
Researchers to develop 'wearable' robotic tools for surgery
A collaborative team of researchers is to develop a wearable robotic system for minimally invasive surgery, also known as keyhole surgery, that will offer surgeons natural and dexterous movement as well as the ability to 'sense,' 'see,' control and safely navigate through the surgical environment.
Researchers make old gut stem cells grow like young ones in a dish
Intestines experience a lot of wear and tear. Without the stalwart stem cells that live in our gut's lining, our ability to absorb food would dwindle and bacteria from the digestive tract would be able to breach the bloodstream.
Major research project provides new clues to schizophrenia
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet collaborating in the large-scale Karolinska Schizophrenia Project are taking an integrative approach to unravel the disease mechanisms of schizophrenia.
Money, not access, key to resident food choices in 'food deserts'
A new study finds that, while access to healthy foods is a significant challenge, the biggest variable limiting diet choices in so-called 'food deserts' is limited financial resources.
Shaping the future
Iron nanocubes may be key in the future of NO2 sensing.
High rate of return to running following arthroscopic hip surgery
Ninety-six percent of patients who were recreational or competitive runners prior to developing hip bone spurs returned to their sport within nine months of arthroscopic surgery, according to research presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).
Microbes measure ecological restoration success
The success of ecological restoration projects around the world could be boosted using a potential new tool that monitors soil microbes.
Development launches Special Issue on Organoids
It might sound like science fiction, but organoids -- miniature versions of organs grown in the dish -- can now be made for many different types of tissues and organs.
PolyU launches The D. H. Chen Foundation Nobel Laureate Lecture Series
In celebration of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU)'s 80th anniversary, we are honoured to launch the PolyU 80th Anniversary ?
Antibiotics not effective for clinically infected eczema in children
Estimates suggest that 40 percent of eczema flares are treated with topical antibiotics, but findings from a study led by Cardiff University suggest there is no meaningful benefit from the use of either oral or topical antibiotics for milder clinically infected eczema in children.
Digital PCR shows high reproducibility in international multicenter study
Research shows that digital PCR is capable of reproducibly measuring a single nucleotide variant between labs, demonstrating the method's potential for routine clinical testing.
Study identifies molecular clues for age-related intestinal issues
Intestinal stem cells rejuvenate daily so bowels will stay healthy and function normally, but a new study in Cell Reports suggests they also age along with people and lose their regenerative capacity.
Overuse of antibiotics brings risks for bees -- and for us
Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have found that honeybees treated with a common antibiotic were half as likely to survive the week after treatment compared with a group of untreated bees, a finding that may have health implications for bees and people alike.
Men face greater risk of death following osteoporosis-related fractures
Men face a greater risk of mortality following a fracture related to osteoporosis, a common disease where the bones become weak and brittle, according to new research presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).
Study casts doubt on whether internet filters in the home protect teenagers online
An Oxford study finds no link between household internet filters and the likelihood of the teenagers in those households being better protected from unpleasant online material.
Topical curcumin gel effective in treating burns and scalds
What is the effect of Topical Curcumin Gel for treating burns and scalds?
Greenhouse gases: First it was cows -- now it's larvae!
Scientists at UNIGE have discovered that Chaoborus spp uses the methane it finds in lakebeds to help it move around.
Compared to home-based program, in-patient rehab following knee replacement does not improve mobility
Among patients with osteoarthritis undergoing total knee replacement and who have not experienced a significant early complication, the use of inpatient rehabilitation compared with a monitored home-based program did not improve mobility at 26 weeks after surgery, according to a study appearing in the March 14 issue of JAMA.
Finding positive in the negative
A clinical trial of an antibody-drug conjugate that combines the active portion of a chemotherapy drug with an antibody targeting a molecule expressed on tumor cells appears promising for the treatment of metastatic triple-negative breast cancer.
Noninvasive imaging helps predict heart attacks
Noninvasive CT angiography and stress tests can help predict which patients are likely to suffer a heart attack or other adverse cardiovascular event, according to a new study.
Experts find strong case for over-the-counter oral contraceptives for adults and teens
After reviewing decades of published studies, a team of pediatric, adolescent and women's health experts concludes that regulatory, behavioral and scientific evidence supports switching oral contraceptives from prescription-only status to over-the-counter (OTC) availability.
VTT has developed stand-up pouches from renewable raw materials and nanocellulose
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd. has developed lightweight 100 percent bio-based stand-up pouches with high technical performance.
Quantum physics offers insight into music expressivity
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) are bringing us closer to understanding the musical experience through a novel approach to analysing a common musical effect known as vibrato.
Spiders eat astronomical numbers of insects
A new study reveals some stunning estimates about how much the world's spiders eat annually: between 400 and 800 million tons of insects and other invertebrates.
Bariatric surgery impacts joint replacement outcomes in very obese patients
A study from Hospital for Special Surgery finds that in morbidly obese patients, bariatric surgery performed prior to a total hip or knee replacement can reduce in-hospital and 90-day postoperative complications and improve patient health, but it does not reduce the risk of needing a revision surgery.
Waiting to be sold: IUPUI researchers develop model to predict probability of home sales
Computer scientists from Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis have developed what they believe to be the first data-based answer to how long it will take for a house to sell.
New nano-implant could one day help restore sight
A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences Inc. have developed the nanotechnology and wireless electronics for a new type of retinal prosthesis that brings research a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina to respond to light.
Sonic cyber attack shows security holes in ubiquitous sensors
Sound waves could be used to hack into critical sensors in a broad array of technologies including smartphones, automobiles, medical devices and the Internet of Things, University of Michigan research shows.
Less than half of elderly hip fracture patients take vitamin D supplements
Despite national recommendations for daily vitamin D intake, a new study presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) found that just 45.7 percent of patients reported consistently taking vitamin D supplements following a hip fracture, a known treatment and preventative strategy for osteoporosis.
Bowel cancer medication could help combat early-onset Parkinson's disease
A Medical Research Council-funded University of Leicester study shows folinic acid can protect neurons in fruit flies.
Ice age thermostat prevented extreme climate cooling
During the ice ages, an unidentified regulatory mechanism prevented atmospheric CO2 concentrations from falling below a level that could have led to runaway cooling, reports a study conducted by researchers of the ICTA-Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and published online in Nature Geoscience this week.
Increased risk of postop infection when surgery closely follows epidural steroid injection
Research conducted at the University of Virginia suggests that patients may wish to take a one- to three-month break from lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESIs) before undergoing lumbar spinal fusion surgery.
USDA announces $2.9 million to support tribal extension programs
The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced $2.9 million in available funding for projects that make extension programs and resources more accessible to Native American communities.
Researchers identify how inflammation spreads through the brain after injury
Researchers have identified a new mechanism by which inflammation can spread throughout the brain after injury.
High cholesterol levels linked with rotator cuff surgery failure
Patients with higher cholesterol levels face a significantly greater risk for failure of minimally invasive (arthroscopic) rotator cuff surgery, according to a new study to be presented on Friday, March 17, at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).
Study cautions against use of bone morphogenetic proteins in children's spine surgery
Bone morphogenetic proteins, commonly used off-label to enhance pediatric spinal fusion, did not improve revision rates for pediatric spinal fusion, according to a study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery.
'Dreamers' policy may have reduced depression in eligible individuals
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Massachusetts General Hospital researchers reported that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program appears to have reduced depression among eligible undocumented immigrants, often referred to as 'Dreamers.' These findings come on the heels of ongoing debates around the future under the Trump Administration of immigration policies, including the DACA program, which provides renewable, temporary work permits to undocumented immigrants who arrived in the US as children.
One-third of costs prior to knee replacement for non-recommended therapies
In the year prior to total knee replacement (TKR) surgery, almost one-third of the costs for treatment of arthritis symptoms went toward strategies not recommended by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), according to new research presented today at the 2017 AAOS Annual Meeting.
Four-year study finds group meditation reduces drug-related deaths in general population
A new study in SAGE Open reports a novel solution to US fatality rates from the misuse of prescribed and illegal drugs.
Study finds no benefit, but possible harm, from drug used to prevent preterm births
A drug commonly prescribed to pregnant women with a history of delivering babies early provides no benefit.
Experimental Ebola vaccine regimen induced durable immune response, study finds
A two-vaccine regimen to protect against Ebola virus disease induced an immune response that persisted for approximately one year in healthy adult volunteers, according to results from a Phase 1 clinical trial published March 14 in JAMA.
New strategy may help combat Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have uncovered a mechanism that helps block the accumulation of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease.
The molecular underpinnings of T cell exhaustion
One reason we survive into adulthood is that cell-killing T cells usually recognize and eliminate cancerous or pathogen-infected cells.
Report: Milkweed losses may not fully explain monarch butterfly declines
Monarch butterfly declines cannot be attributed merely to declines in milkweed abundance, researchers report.
What makes farmers try new practices?
Change is never easy. But when it comes to adopting new agricultural practices, some farmers are easier to convince than others.
Cooking at home tonight? It's likely cheaper and healthier, study finds
People who cook at home more often, rather than eating out, tend to have healthier overall diets without higher food expenses.
Volker Busskamp receives prize for application-oriented neurobiological research
The young researcher has been awarded for his contribution to a gene therapy approach to treat retinitis pigmentosa and for the development of artificial neuronal circuits.
15 years of GRACE: Satellite mission flies thrice its planned time
GRACE began with a radical idea. Principal investigator Byron Tapley (University of Texas Center for Space Research) said, 'The completely new idea about GRACE was the perception that measuring and tracking mass gives you a way to probe the Earth system.' Measuring changes in mass has been a key to discovering how water and the solid Earth are changing deep underground in places humans can't go and can't see.
Combining opioids with anti-anxiety medicines linked to greater risk of overdose
Taking opioids (strong prescription painkillers) together with benzodiazepines (widely used to treat anxiety and sleep problems) is associated with greater risk of opioid overdose, finds a study in The BMJ today.
New study links opioid epidemic to childhood emotional abuse
A study by researchers at the University of Vermont has revealed a link between adult opioid misuse and childhood emotional abuse, a new finding that suggests a rethinking of treatment approaches for opioid abusers.
Louisiana wetlands struggling with sea-level rise 4 times the global average
Without major efforts to rebuild Louisiana's wetlands, particularly in the westernmost part of the state, there is little chance that the coast will be able to withstand the accelerating rate of sea-level rise, a new Tulane University study concludes.
Spiders eat 400-800 million tons of prey every year
It has long been suspected that spiders are one of the most important groups of predators of insects.
In times of plenty, penguin parents keep feeding their grown offspring
A research team led by University of Washington biology professor Dee Boersma reports that fully grown Galapagos penguins who have fledged -- or left the nest -- continue to beg their parents for food.
Power of shared pain triggers extreme self-sacrifice
The extreme self-sacrificial behavior found in suicide bombers and soldiers presents an evolutionary puzzle: how can a trait that calls for an individual to make the ultimate sacrifice, especially in defense of a group of non-kin, persist over evolutionary time?
3-D visualization of the pancreas -- new tool in diabetes research
Umeå researchers have created datasets that map the three-dimensional distribution and volume of the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas.
Immune molecule protects against Zika virus infection in animal models
A molecule naturally produced by the immune system protects mice and monkeys against Zika virus infection, an international team of researchers has found.
Conducting the Milgram experiment in Poland, psychologists show people still obey
A replication of one of the most widely known obedience studies, the Stanley Milgram experiment, shows that even today, people are still willing to harm others in pursuit of obeying authority.
AASM publishes new guideline for diagnostic testing for adult sleep apnea
A new clinical practice guideline from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine establishes clinical practice recommendations for the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea in adults.
Why do people switch their language?
Due to increasing globalization, the linguistic landscape of our world is changing; many people give up use of one language in favor of another.
Genetics Society of America honors Susan A. Gerbi with the 2017 George W. Beadle Award
The Genetics Society of America is pleased to announce that Susan A.
Medication to treat anxiety, depression may reduce hip, knee replacement revision risk
Patients who take selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), commonly prescribed medications used to treat anxiety and depression, may experience a reduced risk of revision surgery following total hip (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR), according to new research presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).
The Holberg Prize names British philosopher Baroness Onora O'Neill as 2017 Laureate
Today, The Holberg Prize -- one of the largest international prizes awarded annually to an outstanding researcher in the arts and humanities, the social sciences, law or theology -- named British author, scholar and philosophy professor Onora Sylvia O'Neill as its 2017 Laureate.
Better air quality standards in China could save 3 million early deaths each year
Adopting and enforcing tighter air quality standards in China could save three million premature deaths each year and may bring about tremendous public health benefits, say experts in The BMJ today.
At mealtime, honey bees prefer country blossoms to city blooms
Hungry honey bees appear to favor flowers in agricultural areas over those in neighboring urban areas.
William Small, Jr., M.D., editor of new edition of classic radiation oncology textbook
William Small, Jr., M.D., chair of Loyola Medicine's radiation oncology department, is editor of a revised third edition of a classic reference in radiation oncology.
Emotional intelligence helps make better doctors
A study found that pediatric residents had a median score of 110 on an emotional intelligence survey, compared to an average score of 100 in the general population.
Female soccer players suffer the most concussions in high school sports
High school girls have a significantly higher concussion rate than boys, with female soccer players suffering the most concussions, according to new research presented today at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS).
New extension improves inflight Wi-Fi
Inspired by the notoriously slow inflight Wi-Fi service, Northwestern University's Fabián Bustamante developed ScaleUp, an extension for the Google Chrome browser that drastically improves web browsing speeds at 30,000 feet.
Imaging at the speed of light
Over the past few years, Chunlei Guo and his research team at the University of Rochester have used lasers to manipulate the properties of target materials and make them, for instance, superhydrophilic or superhydrophobic.
Growing isolation of poor helps explain changes in concentrated poverty
Concentrated poverty -- neighborhoods where 40 percent of the population or more lives below the federal poverty level -- is back on the rise for all races in the United States, according to Penn State demographers.
Switching oxygen on and off
At the Vienna University of Technology, it has now been possible to selectively switch individual oxygen molecules sitting on a titanium oxide surface between a non-reactive to a reactive state using a special force microscope.
UTHealth study paves the way for Clostridium difficile treatment in pill form
Frozen and freeze-dried products for Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) are nearly as effective as fresh product at treating patients with Clostridium difficile (C-diff) infection, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health and Kelsey Research Foundation.
Two common tests aren't effective in predicting premature births, says new national study
Two screening tests often used to try to predict which pregnant women are likely to deliver prematurely aren't effective in low-risk women, according to a national collaborative study of more than 10,000 women, led by clinician-researchers at University of Utah Health Sciences and Intermountain Healthcare.

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