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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | March 18, 2017


Study shows surgery reverses pseudoparalysis in patients with rotator cuff tears
Research presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day in San Diego shows arthroscopic superior capsule reconstruction (SCR), a surgical approach to treat irreparable rotator cuff tears, may eliminate pseudoparalysis and significantly improve shoulder function.
No Increase in Bleeding Complications with Rivaroxaban Post-ACS
Patients with acute coronary syndrome who were treated with the blood-thinning drug rivaroxaban in addition to an antiplatelet medication (clopidogrel or ticagrelor) experienced no increase in bleeding complications compared with patients who received the standard treatment of aspirin plus an antiplatelet drug, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
Combining risk score tools improves stroke prediction for atrial fibrillation patients
Combining two independent, scientifically-proven risk measurements allows physicians to better predict an atrial fibrillation patient's risk of stroke or death.
New study finds potential breakthrough in determining who's at risk for heart attacks
Researchers are revisiting their views on the relative dangers soft and hard atherosclerotic plaque deposits pose to heart health.
Guidelines differ on recommendations of statin treatment for African-Americans
Approximately 1 in 4 African-American individuals recommended for statin therapy under guidelines from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association are no longer recommended for statin therapy under guidelines from the US Preventive Services Task Force, according to a study published online by JAMA Cardiology.
Study finds new markers associated with recurrence of AFib in previously treated patients
A new study suggests that certain molecules are associated with the recurrence of erratic heartbeats in some patients after ablation therapy.
Heads up tackling program decreases concussion rates, say researchers
Consistently using a tackling education program appears to help lessen youth football concussion severity and occurrence, say researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day in San Diego, Calif.
PCSK9 inhibitor evolocumab not associated with decline in memory or cognitive function
New research led by the TIMI Study Group at Brigham and Women's Hospital in collaboration with Brown University and the University of Geneva reassuringly finds no association between the use of the PCSK9 inhibitor evolocumab and a decline in memory or cognitive function.
New blood thinner better at preventing recurrent blood clots than aspirin
An international research team with prominent Canadian leadership has found that the blood thinner rivaroxaban is as safe as aspirin, and more effective at preventing recurrence of life-threatening blood clots in the legs and lungs, according to a study being published in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
Study shows benefits to treating all clogged arteries at once after heart attack
Patients experiencing a major heart attack often have more than one clogged artery, but under current guidelines doctors typically only clear the blockage responsible for the heart attack.
High-risk pulmonary embolism patients often go without most effective treatments
In a new study presented today at the American College of Cardiology 66th Annual Scientific Session, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found that the utilization rates of these potentially life-saving medications are low, particularly in the sub-group of PE patients who are critically ill.
PCI, drugs equally beneficial for treating fully blocked arteries
This study shows percutaneous coronary intervention is not needed in all cases.
Levels of biomarkers after ACL surgery may signal severity of osteoarthritis later in life
A majority of Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction patients develop a condition known as posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) within 15 years of surgery, which can be debilitating and limit activity.
Rivaroxaban reduces VTE recurrence compared with aspirin
In patients at elevated risk for a recurrence of potentially life-threatening blood clots, a low dose of the oral blood-thinning medication rivaroxaban reduced recurrences more than three-fold compared with aspirin, with no significant increase in bleeding side effects, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
No evidence of cognitive issues when evolocumab added to statin therapy
There is no evidence that adding a new cholesterol-lowering drug to treatment with a statin causes memory loss or other problems with cognition or thinking, according to findings from the EBBINGHAUS study, the largest, most rigorously designed study to address this issue to date.
Lifestyle intervention leads to 10-point drop in systolic blood pressure
In the first randomized, double-blinded trial of an online behavioral intervention for high blood pressure, participants in web-based lifestyle counseling reduced their systolic blood pressure (the higher number in a blood-pressure reading) by 10 mmHg, compared with a 6 mmHg reduction for those taking part in a web-based control intervention, a statistically significant difference.
No benefit of synthetic HDL-C on arterial plaque
Injection of a novel form of synthetic high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), or good cholesterol, into the arteries of patients who had recently had a heart attack did not reduce the volume of fatty deposits, or plaque, in the arteries, compared with placebo injections, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
Surgery may not offer additional benefit to patients with tennis elbow, study shows
Surgical approaches to treating tennis elbow may not offer additional benefit to patients, as discussed in research presented at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day in San Diego.
Shoulder injuries in professional baseball players: A continuing puzzle
Professional baseball players struggle to return to a high level of play after biceps tenodesis (BP) surgery, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Specialty Day in San Diego.
African-Americans may receive different advice on statin therapy
Study investigates whether modern statin guidelines accurately identify African American patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
Correlation between second ACL reconstruction and physical therapy utilization noted
Age, gender and frequency of physical therapy utilization after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery may be correlated with second ACL reconstruction rates, according to researchers presenting their work at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day today.
New tool for assessing clogged arteries performs well, reduces discomfort
For patients experiencing angina (chest pain) or a heart attack, a new tool called instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) was equivalent to the currently-preferred tool, fractional flow reserve (FFR), in terms of incidence of major adverse events according to two studies presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
Outcomes for Absorb stent acceptable at 1 to 2 years, with caveats
Patients receiving the Absorb everolimus-eluting bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS), a dissolving stent to open clogged vessels around the heart, showed outcomes comparable with patients receiving the Xience drug-eluting metal stent between years one and two.

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