Brightsurf Science News & Current Events

March 19, 2017
Blood test can detect heart damage after non-cardiac surgery
A blood test for a protein called high-sensitivity troponin T, which is released into the bloodstream when injury to the heart occurs, can identify patients with heart damage after non-cardiac surgery whose lives could potentially be saved with timely treatment, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.

Genetically guided warfarin dosing lowers risk of some adverse events
Using genetic testing to help personalize doses of warfarin therapy given to patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery appears to lower the risk of combined adverse events compared with clinically guided dosing, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.

Embol-X and CardioGard do not reduce overall number of brain lesions, may affect size
Two FDA-cleared medical devices designed to remove potential vessel-blocking debris particles from the bloodstream during aortic valve replacement, known as Embol-X and CardioGard, did not significantly reduce overall number of brain infarcts over standard surgical procedure, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.

American Chemical Society national meeting features presidential events
American Chemical Society (ACS) President Allison A. Campbell, Ph.D., will focus on areas of significant importance -- the health of our planet, the safe practice of science and strong technical programming -- at the ACS 253rd National Meeting & Exposition, April 2-6, in San Francisco.

Closing left atrial appendage reduces stroke risk from AFib
For patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib), a common heart rhythm disorder, closing the area of the heart known as the left atrial appendage as an add-on procedure during cardiac surgery was associated with a 40 percent reduction in the risk of thromboembolism (a condition when a blood clot forms and blocks an artery, which can cause a stroke or other complications) according to an observational study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.

Pacemaker program can reduce dangerous fainting episodes
Patients with recurrent fainting episodes (syncope) who received a pacemaker delivering a pacing program designed to detect and stop the abnormal heart rhythms that precede syncope had a seven-fold reduction in fainting compared with patients in a placebo pacing group, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.

Use of levosimendan with heart-lung machine fails to improve outcomes
When used as a preventive measure during heart surgery, the heart failure drug levosimendan did not significantly reduce rates of death, heart attack, kidney dialysis or use of a mechanical assist device among patients at high risk for low cardiac output syndrome, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.

Impact of wobbly bridges and skyscrapers on human health tested in government-funded research center
The impact of vibrations from very tall buildings and wobbly bridges and floors on people's health and wellbeing is to be researched in a new £7.2 million government-funded national research facility.

For atrial fibrillation ablation, newer anticoagulant reduces major bleeds
Uninterrupted treatment with dabigatran, a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant (NOACs), before, during and after ablation to treat atrial fibrillation significantly reduced the incidence of major bleeding events compared with uninterrupted use of the more established anticoagulant warfarin, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.

CT scans reveal reduced leaflet motion after aortic valve replacement
About 12 percent of patients undergoing aortic valve replacement developed non-symptomatic blood clots around the valve leaflets (known as subclinical leaflet thrombosis) that reduced the motion of the valves, according to an observational study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.

New study adds to concerns about heightened risk of death for AFib patients taking digoxin
Patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib) who are given digoxin to control their symptoms have an increased risk of death, whether or not they have a diagnosis of heart failure, compared with patients not taking the drug, and this risk increases with higher levels of digoxin in the bloodstream, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.

Heart procedure linked with bleeding in the brain, neurological impairment
Small leakages from blood vessels in the brain, known as microbleeds, increase with age and are associated with cognitive decline.
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