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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | March 30, 2017


Children with autism find understanding facial expressions difficult
Young people with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have difficulties recognizing and distinguishing between different facial expressions, according to research from one of the largest studies to look at emotion recognition in children and adolescents with ASC.
Women's reproductive health research scholar to study preterm birth
Maternal-fetal medicine specialist Sarah M. Davis, M.D., was recently named the seventh scholar in the Brown University/Women & Infants Hospital Women's Reproductive Health Research (WRHR) Career Development Program.
RIT researchers win USGS grant to improve Landsat 8 data
Rochester Institute of Technology researchers have won funding from the US Geological Survey to ensure accurate temperature data from NASA's Landsat 8 satellite.
Larger doses of vitamin C may lead to a greater reduction in common cold duration
The relationship between vitamin C dosage and its effects on the duration of the common cold symptoms may extend to 6-8 grams per day according to a statistical analysis published in Nutrients.
Study demonstrates how Zika virus rewires and repurposes invaded cells
New research reveals a high-resolution view of the Zika viral life cycle within infected cells and shows dramatic changes in the cell's architecture throughout the infection process.
Follow-up study suggests group meditation reduced murder rates in large US cities
A follow-up study in the Journal of Health and Environmental Research examines a novel proposed approach to help reduce murder rates in large US urban areas.
It's true -- the sound of nature helps us relax
Researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School have discovered that playing 'natural sounds' affects the bodily systems that control the flight-or-fright and rest-digest autonomic nervous systems, with associated effects in the resting activity of the brain.
An epigenetic lesion could be responsible for acute T-cell leukemia
Researchers from the Epigenetics and Cancer Biology Program (PEBC) led by Dr.
Even short-duration heat waves could lead to failure of coffee crops
'Hot coffee' is not a good thing for java enthusiasts when it refers to plants beset by the high-temperature stress that this century is likely to bring.
Aging: Cell coordination breakdown
Scientists have resolved a key question in aging research by showing how mouse immune cells of different ages respond to stimulation.
ELCC 2017: Latest news in lung cancer
Around 2,000 delegates from across Europe and worldwide will learn about the latest practice-changing science in the field of thoracic oncology at the seventh European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC) in Geneva, Switzerland, from May 5 to 8, 2017.
Satellite galaxies at edge of Milky Way coexist with dark matter, says RIT study
Research conducted by scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology rules out a challenge to the accepted standard model of the universe and theory of how galaxies form by shedding new light on a problematic structure.
Bad cold? If you're lonely, it may feel worse
A Rice University-led study showed people who feel lonely are likely to report more severe symptoms from the common cold.
Molecular therapy set to protect at-risk patients against heart attack and stroke
Even a single dose of a specific ribonucleic acid molecule, known as a small interfering RNA (siRNA), offers patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease long-lasting protection against high LDL cholesterol -- one of the main risk factors for heart attack and stroke.
Stem cells help explain varied genetics behind rare neurologic disease
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have successfully grown stem cells from children with a devastating neurological disease to help explain how different genetic backgrounds can cause common symptoms.
Napping flies have higher resistance to deadly human pathogen
A new University of Maryland study finds that fruit flies that take frequent naps have the strongest resistance to both a fungal infection and to Drosophila 'superbug' bacteria.
Explaining the accelerating expansion of the universe without dark energy
Enigmatic dark energy, thought to make up 68 percent of the universe, may not exist at all, according to a Hungarian-American team.
Beyond graphene: Advances make reduced graphene oxide electronics feasible
Researchers have developed a technique for converting positively charged (p-type) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into negatively charged (n-type) rGO, creating a layered material that can be used to develop rGO-based transistors for use in electronic devices.
Graphene mobile innovation wows at the GSMA Mobile World Congress
The Graphene Experience Zone proved a show highlight to many at the 2017 GSMA Mobile World Congress (MWC).
Glacier photos illustrate climate change
Boulder, Colorado, USA: Climate is changing -- there should be zero doubt about this circa 2017.
Different databases, differing statistics on racial disparities in immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy
Three major national databases include varying estimates of racial gaps in the use of immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) after mastectomy for breast cancer, reports a study in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
Prudence, impatience and laziness: Are these contagious personality traits?
People tend to unconsciously imitate others' prudent, impatient or lazy attitudes, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology.
Link between common prostate cancer treatment, dementia detailed in new Penn study
A new analysis of patients who have undergone treatment for prostate cancer shows a connection between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) -- a testosterone-lowering therapy and a common treatment for the disease -- and dementia, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
Methane emissions from trees
A new study from the University of Delaware is one of the first in the world to show that tree trunks in upland forests actually emit methane rather than store it, representing a new, previously unaccounted source of this powerful greenhouse gas.
Experts present advances in treating neurological disease at the INS 13th World Congress
Experts will present diverse advances in neuromodulation from May 27 to June 1, 2017 at the 13th World Congress of the International Neuromodulation Society in Edinburgh, Scotland.
Speeding star gives new clues to breakup of multi-star system
Three stars have been discovered that now hold the record as the youngest-known examples of a super-fast star category.
How do plants make oxygen? Ask cyanobacteria
A new study adds 41 new types of cyanobacteria, and helps pin down when in history they 'invented' oxygen-producing photosynthesis.
UAB creates triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules for guided drug delivery
Chemists have designed triple-threat cancer-fighting polymer capsules that bring the promise of guided drug delivery closer to preclinical testing.
Medication history for patients on blood thinners is critical to EMS
One change to field triage guidelines for emergency medical services (EMS) responding to older adults with head trauma could make a 'clinically important improvement over usual care,' according to a study and accompanying editorial published earlier this month in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('Out-of-Hospital Triage of Older Adults With Head Injury: A Retrospective Study of the Effect of Adding 'Anticoagulation or Antiplatelet Medication Use' as a Criterion' and 'Can an Out-of-Hospital Medication History Save Lives for Injured Older Adults?').
Proteins that can take the heat
Ancient proteins may offer clues on how to engineer proteins that can withstand the high temperatures required in industrial applications, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
High doses of vitamin C to improve cancer treatment passes human safety trial
Clinical trials found that it is safe to regularly infuse brain and lung cancer patients with 800-1,000 times the daily recommended amount of vitamin C as a potential strategy to improve outcomes of standard cancer treatments.
Researchers find new genetic links underlying progressively blinding eye disease
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues at Case Western University, Duke University, the National Institutes of Health and elsewhere, have identified three novel genomic loci -- distinct stretches of genetic material on chromosomes -- linked to Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD), which often clusters in families and is roughly 39 percent heritable.
Lung probe that spots infections aims to cut antibiotic overuse
A new imaging tool that rapidly diagnoses bacterial lung infections could help prevent unnecessary use of antibiotics in intensive care units.
Annals publishes annual updates in internal medicine
Annals of Internal Medicine, the flagship journal of the American College of Physicians (ACP), has published summaries of the most important medical studies published in 2016 in the fields of general internal medicine, cardiology, hematology, endocrinology, gastroenterology and hepatology, rheumatology, and perioperative, pulmonary, and geriatric medicine.
New research finds novel method for generating airway cells from stem cells
Researchers have developed a new approach for growing and studying cells they hope one day will lead to curing lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis through 'personalized medicine.'
Single-cell RNA sequencing reveals detailed composition of two major types of brain tumor
Detailed analysis of two brain tumor subtypes by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has revealed that they may originate from the same type of neural progenitor cells and be distinguished by gene mutation patterns and by the composition of their microenvironments.
Book pays homage to August Vollmer, father of American policing
After 10 years of research and a bookcase full of documents, Professor Willard Oliver of Sam Houston State University, College of Criminal Justice published a comprehensive biography of August Vollmer, known as the 'Father of American Policing.'
Rearranging nest boxes keeps more blue orchard bees around
Orchard growers looking for alternatives to honey bees for managed pollination services have new reason to be optimistic about the potential of one honey bee cousin, the blue orchard bee.
Welfare reform that really works
A new study published in the Review of Economic Studies indicates that introducing additional welfare components to tax systems can make people worse off by changing their behavior.
NUS scientists discover novel vulnerabilities in dengue virus
A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore has uncovered hidden vulnerabilities on the surface of the dengue virus.
Vaginal bacteria can trigger recurrent UTIs, study shows
A kind of bacteria found in the vagina may trigger recurrent UTIs, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
Donor-recipient weight and sex mismatch may contribute to kidney transplant failure
A new study indicates that the success of a kidney transplant may rely in part on a kidney donor's weight and sex, factors that are not typically considered when choosing a recipient for a deceased donor kidney.
Fanged fish's heroin-like venom could lead to pain treatments
A fearless fanged coral reef fish that disables its opponents with heroin-like venom could offer hope for the development of new painkillers.
Built from the bottom up, nanoribbons pave the way to 'on-off' states for graphene
A new way to grow narrow ribbons of graphene, a lightweight and strong structure of single-atom-thick carbon atoms linked into hexagons, may address a shortcoming that has prevented the material from achieving its full potential in electronic applications.
Fluctuation in the concentration of calcium ions contributes to brain shape
The first step in shaping the brain is that the neural plate, a sheet-like cell layer, curves to form the neural tube.
Massive, computer-analyzed geological database reveals chemistry of ancient ocean
A study that used a new digital library and machine reading system to suck the factual marrow from millions of geologic publications dating back decades has unraveled a longstanding mystery of ancient life: Why did easy-to-see and once-common structures called stromatolites essentially cease forming over the long arc of earth history?
Cold symptoms feel worse when people feel lonely
Having a cold is bad enough, but having a cold if you're lonely can actually feel worse, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
Researchers profile symbiotic relationship between bacteria and filarial nematodes
Filarial nematodes -- microscopic, thread-like roundworms -- currently infect up to 54 million people worldwide and are the leading cause of disability in the developing world.
Finding faces in a crowd: Context is key when looking for small things in images
Spotting a face in a crowd, or recognizing any small or distant object within a large image, is a major challenge for computer vision systems.
What factors influence a patient's intent to get colorectal cancer screening?
A patient's confidence in their ability to schedule, plan for and properly conduct their part in colorectal screening methods is a key factor that predicts whether they intend to be tested, according to new research from Penn State College of Medicine.
Panda personality traits may play a significant part in breeding success
According to a study published in Biological Conservation, an international peer-reviewed journal in the discipline of conservation biology, personality traits may play a large part in the mating behaviors of the giant panda--and breeding successes or failures may depend on whether a bear's disposition is complementary to that of its prospective mate.
Blind tadpoles learn visually with eyes grafted onto tail, neurotransmitter drug treatment
Blind tadpoles were able to process visual information from eyes grafted onto their tails after being treated with a small molecule neurotransmitter drug that augmented innervation, integration, and function of the transplanted organs.
Internet crystal ball can predict risk of heart disease, diabetes, study finds
An online metabolic calculator predicts people's risk of developing heart disease and diabetes more accurately than traditional methods, a large new study has found.
Industry and occupation affect flu vaccination coverage
Not surprisingly, healthcare workers are almost twice as likely to get flu vaccines as those in other occupations.
Balance test improves insight into illness in schizophrenia
A common symptom of schizophrenia -- not knowing that you're ill -- can be temporarily alleviated using a balance test that stimulates part of the brain with cold water, an exploratory study at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) has shown.
Baraniuk wins Defense Department's Vannevar Bush Fellowship
Rice University compressive-sensing pioneer Richard Baraniuk has won one of the Defense Department's most coveted basic research awards: a five-year fellowship worth up to $3 million for 'blue sky' basic research that could produce revolutionary new technologies.
Nanomagnets for future data storage
An international team of researchers led by chemists from ETH Zurich have developed a method for depositing single magnetizable atoms onto a surface.
Is it a boy or is it a girl? New method to ID baby sea turtles' sex
Is it a boy or is it a girl? For baby sea turtles it's not that cut and dry.
Modern alchemy creates luminescent iron molecules
A group of researchers at Lund University in Sweden have made the first iron-based molecule capable of emitting light.
Waves on sun give NASA new insight into space weather forecasting
New research has uncovered a mechanism, similar to one that occurs on Earth, which may allow new insights into forecasting space weather and activity on the sun.
Method identified to boost detection of highly cancerous stem cells
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU)-led researchers discovered a subpopulation of highly cancerous stem cells in a brain cancer cell line.
Vaginal bacterium triggers recurrent E. coli infection in the mouse bladder
In mice, exposure of the bladder to a common vaginal bacterium awakened dormant Escherichia coli and triggered recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs).
New clinical trial for early-stage eye melanoma offers study of targeted therapy
A first-of-its-kind, potentially groundbreaking new option for treating a form of eye cancer is now in its first phase-1 clinical research trial at Wills Eye Hospital in Philadelphia.
The beginning of the end of order
Classical physics states that a crystal consists of perfectly ordered particles from a continuous symmetrical atomic structure.
New MAVEN findings reveal how Mars' atmosphere was lost to space
Solar wind and radiation are responsible for stripping the Martian atmosphere, transforming Mars from a planet that could have supported life billions of years ago into a frigid desert world, according to new results from NASA's MAVEN (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution Mission) spacecraft led by the University of Colorado Boulder.
Lighter, more efficient, safer lithium-ion batteries
Researchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and the Council for Scientific Research (initialed CSIC in Spanish) have patented a method for making new ceramic electrodes for lithium-ion batteries that are more efficient, cheaper, more resistant and safer than conventional batteries.
Emissions from the edge of the forest
Half of the carbon stored in all of the Earth's vegetation is contained in tropical forests.
Rotating molecules create a brighter future
Scientists have discovered a group of materials which could pave the way for a new generation of high-efficiency lighting, solving a quandary which has inhibited the performance of display technology for decades.
When it comes to biological populations, expect the unexpected
More than three decades of data on the physical, chemical and biological variables in 11 Midwestern lakes show that while lake temperatures and nutrient concentrations rise within relatively expected ranges, biological organisms achieve high population extremes.
Researchers reveal atomic-level activity of green catalyst used in PVC production
UK-U.S. group reports in Science that individual ions of gold dispersed on a carbon support are the ideal catalytic species for converting acetylene, a gas derived from coal, into the molecule used to manufacture PVC.
Search for stellar survivor of a supernova explosion
Astronomers have used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to observe the remnant of a supernova explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud.
The late evolutionary event that gave rise to modern life
The emergence of oxygen-producing bacteria more than two billion years ago gave rise to life as we know it today, and now a new study reveals that this happening might have occurred multiple times.
'Fuzzy' fibers can take rockets' heat
Rice University scientists collaborate with NASA to improve its composite materials for next-generation rocket engines by adding a 'fuzzy' silicon carbide fiber.
Mysterious cosmic explosion surprises astronomers studying the distant x-ray universe
A mysterious flash of X-rays has been discovered by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory in the deepest X-ray image ever obtained.
Getting a leg up: Hand task training transfers motor knowledge to feet
The human brain's cerebellum controls the body's ability to tightly and accurately coordinate and time movements as fine as picking up a pin and as muscular as running a foot race.
Wispy remains of supernova explosion hide possible 'survivor'
This image, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, shows the supernova remnant SNR 0509-68.7, also known as N103B.
Sleep-inducing herb: The key component identified
Can't sleep? Your sleep problems may be improved if you try an Indian herb, Ashwagandha.
Red and violet light reset the circadian clock in algae via novel pathway
A Nagoya University-led team uncovered a pathway in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that resets its circadian clock on exposure to red or violet light.
Kidney transplants: White blood cells control virus replication
Certain white blood cells play an important role in bringing a harmful virus under control after kidney transplantations.
£3 million awarded to Oxford-led consortium for national machine learning computing facility
A consortium of eight UK universities, led by the University of Oxford, has been awarded £3 million by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council to establish a national high-performance computing facility to support machine learning.
Researchers watch blood vessels develop in whole Zebrafish embryos
For the first time, researchers have followed the development of blood vessels in zebrafish embryos without using any labels or contrast agents, which may disturb the biological processes under study.
PolyU develops accurate contactless 3-D fingerprint identification system
The research team of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a system for three-dimensional (3-D) fingerprint identification by adopting ground breaking 3-D fingerprint minutiae recovery and matching technology, pushing contactless biometric technology into a new realm of speed and accuracy for use in identification, crime investigation, immigration control, security of access and forensic applications at an affordable cost.
Immune suppressant ineffective in treating leprosy inflammation
Throughout the course of a leprosy infection, patients often have episodes of painful inflammation affecting their skin and nerves.
CARB-X injects up to $48 million to accelerate first powered by CARB-X projects
The Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Biopharmaceutical Accelerator, or CARB-X, announced today it is investing US $24 million immediately and up to $24 million in milestone-based additional payments over three years to help 11 biotech companies and research teams in the US and UK accelerate the development of new life-saving antibacterials and diagnostics aimed at treating infections caused by the world's deadliest antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
The US burden of neurological disease is nearly $800 billion/year
The most common neurological diseases cost the United States $789 billion in 2014, and this figure is projected to grow as the elderly population doubles between 2011 and 2050, according to a new study published in the April issue of the Annals of Neurology.
Brain's 'GPS' does a lot more than just navigate
The part of the brain that creates mental maps of one's environment plays a much broader role in memory and learning than was previously thought, according to new research published this week in the journal Nature by researchers at Princeton University.
Sensor warns when engine oil in CHP plant is no longer up to the job
Thanks to a new sensor system developed collaboratively by Professor Andreas Schütze and his research team at Saarland University and a group of industrial project partners, unnecessary oil changes could well be a thing of the past.
Biodiversity not a risk factor for emerging diseases and other ecology news
Is biodiversity bad for your health? Understanding the underground dynamics of grassland mosaics.
UTSA professors receive grant to create water-purifying nanomaterial
Heather Shipley, chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Burzik Professor in Engineering Design at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), and Kelly Nash, associate professor of physics, have received a $65,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to develop a nanomaterial that can do the work of a water treatment plant.
Weather forecasting technology used to predict where proteins anchor within human cells
Met Office technology used to study climate change is being used by scientists to predict the behavior of vitalsorting and location of proteins cells in cells of the the human body.
Newly characterized protein has potential to save US farmers millions annually
Instead of turning carbon into food, many plants accidentally make a plant-toxic compound during photosynthesis that is recycled through a process called photorespiration.
Discovery of new predatory dinosaur species gives new insight on their evolution
Scientists discovered a new tyrannosaur with an unusual mode of evolution.
MIT study: NIH funding helps generate private-sector patents
Research grants issued by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) contribute to a significant number of private-sector patents in biomedicine, according to a new study co-authored by an MIT professor.
The Red Planet is severely gassed out
New measurements of Mars' thin atmosphere show that most of it has been lost to space due to bombardment from solar wind; this was the likely driver of the transition in Martian climate from an early, warm, wet environment to today's cold, dry, thin atmosphere.
New study sheds light on how mosquitoes wing it
The unique mechanisms involved in mosquito flight have been shared for the first time in a new Oxford University collaboration, which could inform future aerodynamic innovations, including tiny scale flying tech.
Join forces to reduce US violence, says UK expert
Violence in the US can be reduced if police and health agencies join forces, says a leading UK expert.
Latest research on children's issues to be featured at biennial meeting
The Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) will hold its Biennial Meeting in Austin at the Austin Convention Center from April 6-8, 2017.
Publicly funded research lays critical foundations for private sector
Nearly 10 percent of US National Institutes of Health research grants directly generate a patent, a new study reveals, and more than 30 percent generate articles that are then cited by patents.
NASA examines the rainfall left behind from ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie
Tropical Cyclone Debbie generated a lot of rainfall before and after it made landfall in Queensland, Australia, and NASA analyzed how much rain fell from a vantage point of space.
Previous exposure to flaviviruses increases effects of Zika
Prior infection with dengue or West Nile virus can enhance the effects of Zika infection, a new study using human samples tested in mice finds.
Not a pipe dream anymore -- space-farming: A long legacy leading us to Mars
Research into space farming has resulted in numerous Earth-based advances (e.g., LED lighting for greenhouse and vertical farm applications; new seed potato propagation techniques, etc.) There are still many technical challenges, but plants and associated biological systems can and will be a major component of the systems that keep humans alive when we establish ourselves on the moon, Mars and beyond.
Clemson scientists receive $2.95M to improve and simplify large-scale data analysis
Clemson University scientists Alex Feltus and Melissa Smith have received a $2.95 million collaborative award from the National Science Foundation to develop cyberinfrastructure aimed at providing researchers around the nation and world with a more fluid and flexible system of analyzing large-scale data.
Engineer patents waterlike polymer to create high-temperature ceramics
Using five ingredients -- silicon, boron, carbon, nitrogen and hydrogen -- a Kansas State University engineer has created a liquid polymer that can transform into a ceramic with valuable thermal, optical and electronic properties.
What happens in the living cell?
The plasma membrane serves as a major hub for signal cascades to control crucial cellular processes.
The consumption of legumes is associated with a lower risk of diabetes
Recent results from the PREDIMED (Prevención con Dieta Mediterranea) study show a protective association between total legumes consumption, especially lentils, and the risk of developing subsequent type 2 diabetes after more than 4 years of follow-up of 3349 participants at high cardiovascular risk.
Cancer cells disguise themselves by switching off genes, new research reveals
Scientists have uncovered how tumor cells in aggressive uterine cancer can switch disguises and spread so quickly to other parts of the body.
This timid little fish escapes predators by injecting them with opioid-laced venom
Fang blennies are small fish with big teeth. Specifically, they have two large canine teeth that jut out of their lower jaw.
Lupus Research Alliance Novel Research Grants push discoveries
The Lupus Research Alliance announced today the Novel Research Grant Class of 2017.
Study finds ethnic differences in effect of age-related macular degeneration on visual function
In study that included Chinese, Malay, and Indian participants, researchers found that among those with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) there were ethnic differences in visual function, such as the ability to read a newspaper or labels on medication bottles, according to a study published online by JAMA Ophthalmology.
Melting sea ice may lead to more life in the sea
Every year an increasing amount of sea ice is melting in the Arctic.
USDA announces $4.5 million for higher education support
The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced the availability of $4.5 million in funding to help higher education institutions teach the next generation of food and agricultural science professionals.
The carbon footprint of crime has fallen, study finds
A study led by an engineering doctorate student at the University of Surrey has found that the carbon footprint of crime over the last 20 years has fallen.
Sculpting optical microstructures with slight changes in chemistry
In 2013, materials scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering, grew a garden of self-assembled crystal microstructures.
Public funding essential for advances in biomedical research
Article shows that publicly-funded research creates knowledge that links to private companies' efforts to develop drugs, medical devices, and other patented biomedical products.
USDA announces $1.9 million for alfalfa and forage research
The US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) today announced the availability of $1.9 million in funding for research and development to improve the agricultural productivity, profitability, and conservation of the U.S. alfalfa forage industry.
These 5 tests better predict heart disease risk
Five simple medical tests together provide a broader and more accurate assessment of heart-disease risk than currently used methods, cardiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center found.
Anti-cancer drug gets a boost when combined with antirheumatic
Scientists at EPFL and NTU have discovered that combining an anticancer drug with an antirheumatic produces improved effects against tumors.
Gender-affirming restrooms recommended for schools
Educational policies and practices should explicitly ensure the well-being and healthy development of all students by supporting the right of students to use a bathroom in an institutional context that affirms their gender identity and expression.
Brain's role in Tourette tics simulated in new computational model
A new computer-based brain simulation shows that motor tics in Tourette syndrome may arise from interactions between multiple areas of the brain, rather than a single malfunctioning area, according to a study published in PLOS Computational Biology.
Tigers, ready to be counted
A new methodology developed by the Indian Statistical Institute, and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) may revolutionize how to count tigers and other big cats over large landscapes.

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