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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 04, 2017


Moderate changes in Indian diets could benefit both health and the environment
Moderate changes to typical Indian diets could help to 'future proof' the Indian food system against the predicted decline in availability of groundwater over the coming decades, according to new research.
New rice fights off drought
Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) have developed strains of rice that are resistant to drought in real-world situations.
Sex obsession a killer for male snakes
Snake orgy research by an international team of scientists led from Sydney has confirmed a frenzied approach to the mating season is resulting in males ageing faster and dying earlier and in worse condition than their female counterparts, who prioritize body maintenance over short-term reproductive success.
Scientists engineer sugarcane to produce biodiesel, more sugar for ethanol
A multi-institutional team led by the University of Illinois have proven sugarcane can be genetically engineered to produce oil in its leaves and stems for biodiesel production.
Paper: Experienced auditors better at fraud detection after a simple cue
A simple cue can trigger a marked increase in fraud detection among veteran auditors, says a new study co-written by business professors Jessen L.
Oldest remains of insects from bed bug genus found in Oregon
A cave in Oregon that is the site of some the oldest preserved evidence of human activity in North America was also once home to not-too-distant cousins of the common bed bug.
NASA analyzes storms that caused deadly Colombia mudslides
NASA's IMERG data were used to estimate the amount of rain that fell near Mocoa, Colombia, during the seven-day period from March 26 to April 2, 2017.
Successful reversal of Vasalgel male contraceptive in rabbits
Vasalgel is a polymer gel that is injected into the vas deferens to block the flow of sperm and create a long-lasting contraceptive effect.
Researchers pinpoint new drug target for heart failure patients
Researchers led by Julian E. Stelzer, PhD, associate professor in the department of physiology and biophysics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, have found a new target for drug developers seeking straightforward ways to improve cardiac output in heart failure patients.
Jumping droplets extinguish unpredictable hotspots in electronics
The performance of electronic devices is constrained by their inability to evenly dissipate the waste heat they produce.
The Lancet Planetary Health: Food, climate, greenhouse gas emissions and health
Increasing temperatures, water scarcity, availability of agricultural land, biodiversity loss and climate change threaten to reverse health gains seen over the last century.
Drugs widely used in cancer therapy increase toxicity of chemotherapy in mice
A short-term fast appears to counteract increases in blood sugar caused by common cancer drugs and protect healthy cells in mice from becoming too vulnerable to chemotherapy, according to new research from the University of Southern California.
How stress controls hemoglobin levels in blood
Scientists have revealed an entirely new mechanism through which hemoglobin gene expression is regulated by stress.
Skeletons developed as chemistry of oceans changed, study shows
Skeletons and shells first came into being 550 million years ago as the chemical make-up of seawater changed, a study suggests.
Method identifies epileptic patients who can benefit from surgery
Model based on genetic information can be used to improve early prediction of the response to drugs in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) candidates for surgery.
The genetic basis for timing of reproduction in the Atlantic herring revealed
Animals need to breed at the time of year when their progeny have the best chance of survival.
A staged approach to depression diagnosis could improve communication and treatment
A staged model of depression, ranging from wellness to distress to disorder, could make it easier for diverse groups to talk about depression and has the potential to improve the study of potential depression treatments, argues Vikram Patel of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in London, UK, in an Essay in PLOS Medicine in advance of World Health Day 2017.
Quickly assessing brain bleeding in head injuries using new device
In a clinical trial conducted among adults in 11 hospitals, researchers have shown that a hand-held EEG device approved in 2016 by the US Food and Drug Administration that is commercially available can quickly and with 97 percent accuracy rule out whether a person with a head injury likely has brain bleeding and needs further evaluation and treatment.
Report shines light on installed costs and deployment barriers for residential solar PV
Researchers from the US Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory are making available the most detailed component and system-level cost breakdowns to date for residential photovoltaic (PV) solar systems equipped with energy storage-and quantifying previously unknown soft costs for the first time.
How do you eat your chocolate bunny? Vast majority prefer to start with the ears
New research carried out online has found that 59 percent of 28,113 respondents preferred to eat chocolate rabbits starting with the ears, 33 percent indicated that they had no starting point preference, and 4 percent indicated that they started with the tail or feet.
Study reveals 10,000 years of genetic continuity in northwest North America
A study of the DNA in ancient skeletal remains adds to the evidence that indigenous groups living today in southern Alaska and the western coast of British Columbia are descendants of the first humans to make their home in northwest North America more than 10,000 years ago.
Vitamin D deficiency may indicate cardiovascular disease in overweight and obese children
In overweight and obese children and adolescents, vitamin D deficiency is associated with early markers of cardiovascular disease, a new study reports.
Method may help myeloma patients avoid painful biopsies
Engineers at MIT have devised a microfluidic technique to capture and count circulating plasma cells from small samples of blood.
Living downwind of coal-fired power plant could increase risk of low birth weight
Drawing on evidence from a Pennsylvania power plant located upwind of New Jersey, a group of researchers led by Muzhe Yang of Lehigh University studied live singleton births that occurred from 1990 to 2006 in the area downwind of the plant.
There's a cost to 'bee-ing' too smart, U of G professor finds
A U of G researcher has discovered that smart bumblebees die sooner and don't collect as much food over their life spans as their less intelligent co-workers.
Nurse fellowship immerses Ph.D. students in nursing care while enhancing scientific inquiry
The Hillman Program in Nursing Innovation, developed the idea for an integrated B.S.N. to Ph.D. program to accelerate education opportunities for the next generation of nurse researchers.
To e-, or not to e-, the question for the exotic 'Si-III' phase of silicon
It would be difficult to overestimate the importance of silicon when it comes to computing, solar energy, and other technological applications.
Mini brains from the petri dish
A new method could push research into developmental brain disorders an important step forward.
Streamlining mass production of printable electronics
While memory devices are becoming progressively more flexible, their ease of fabrication and integration in low performance applications have been generally been treated as being of secondary importance.
Industry experts discuss advantages & risks of shifting data analytics to the cloud
Thought leaders in both cloud computing and big data examine the factors driving increasing numbers of companies to move their enterprises to the cloud, explore the synergy between the cloud and notebooks, and debate whether the cloud is able to provide the level of information security needed by enterprises in an insightful Expert Panel Discussion published in Big Data.
Hair strands could reveal lifestyle secrets of criminals (video)
Hair fiber analysis, a forensic crime tool with a questionable past, could soon have a brighter future.
Technique makes more efficient, independent holograms
Recently, a team of researchers encoded multiple holographic images in a metasurface that can be unlocked separately with differently polarized light.
MERS-like coronavirus identified in Ugandan bat
A team of researchers in the United States and Uganda has identified a novel coronavirus in a bat from Uganda that is similar to the one causing Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in people, giving further credence to the theory that such viruses originate in bats.
Inhaled corticosteroids may raise women's risk of the metabolic syndrome
Use of inhaled corticosteroids in women is associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) and an increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of risk factors for type 2 diabetes and heart disease, researchers have found.
Delaying marriage in developing countries benefits children
Delaying the marriage age of young women in parts of the developing world has significant positive effects for their children, a new study shows.
Airbnb fans and critics both correct in home-sharing debate, says study
Most Airbnb hosts in Manhattan make less than $10,000 a year, but hosts who rent out their homes for more than 90 days each year make $20,000 or more, generating 80 percent of the revenue, says a new study by Columbia University researchers.
Two new mechanisms for herbicide resistance found in Palmer amaranth
Palmer amaranth is a nightmare of a weed, causing yield losses up to 80 percent in severely infested soybean fields.
Psychiatric disorders do not increase risk of Alzheimer's disease
Psychiatric disorders do not increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland.
New drug delivery system shows promise for fighting solid tumors
A new cancer-drug delivery system shows the ability to exploit the oxygen-poor areas of solid tumors that make the growths resistant to standard chemotherapy and radiation treatment.
Disrupted stress hormone signals in bone cells protect from diet-induced obesity
A high-calorie diet, even without a high amount of fat, causes bone loss, and both high-calorie and high-fat diets induce excessive fat gain and insulin resistance, a new study conducted in mice finds.
Electronic control to ensure photovoltaic systems always work at maximum power
The Advanced Control Group of the UPV/EHU's Department of Systems Engineering and Automation has developed a control system designed to ensure that photovoltaic generators always work at their maximum power point by adapting them in terms of the level of irradiance received from the sun and the load connected to the system.
New insight into leading viral cause of congenital birth defects
A study led by Cardiff University has revealed why CMV -- a virus responsible for 1,000 birth defects a year in the UK -- is so adept at evading the immune system.
Using drugs to weaken traumatic memories
A potential new approach to treat posttraumatic stress disorder: After taking the antibiotic doxycycline, study participants remembered an unpleasant event considerably less, as experiments conducted by a team of researchers from the University Psychiatric Hospital and the University of Zurich reveal.
Are looks more important than personality when choosing a man?
When mothers and daughters have to choose potential partners, they do not look much further than skin deep.
Individuals of victimized groups require group sincerity before giving forgiveness
In a series of studies social psychologists examined group forgiveness and found that individuals are astute perceivers of political process.
Living at home the best survival strategy for young kangaroos
Having a social life comes at a cost for grey kangaroos, with 'mingling' mothers reducing the chances of survival for their offspring.
Drought linked with human health risks in US analysis
A Yale-led analysis of health claims in 22 US states found that severe drought conditions increased the risk of mortality -- and, in some cases, cardiovascular disease -- among adults 65 or over.
Studying the brain's suspension system in TBIs
Traumatic brain injury, or TBI, can be devastating and debilitating.
Paintings, sunspots and frost fairs: Rethinking the Little Ice Age
The whole concept of the 'Little Ice Age' is 'misleading,' as the changes were small-scale, seasonal and insignificant compared with present-day global warming, a group of solar and climate scientists argue.
So sheep may safely graze
From a large genome study, a team of French and Argentinian scientists may have successfully identified the mutations behind the sheep traits that shepherds began saving from the hunt -- for their prized wool.
Stopping Zika from crossing the placenta
Although the World Health Organization ended its global health emergency on Zika last November, the virus could still make a comeback this summer.
Has music streaming killed the instrumental intro?
Remember those drawn-out, dramatic intros into the pop power ballads of the 80s?
How to save animals by reducing roadkill
Of the more than 40 roadkill prevention methods available, a new study shows that, overall, fences, with or without crossing structures, reduce roadkill by 54 percent, when considering all species combined.
Pre-existing immunity to dengue and West Nile may cause increased risk in Zika-infected
As the Zika virus continues to spread rapidly across the globe, it might pose a particular risk to people previously infected with two related viruses, dengue and West Nile, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have found.
Supercomputers reveal how cell membranes keep cancer-causing proteins turned off
Two biophysicists from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have used supercomputers to show how cell membranes control the shape, and consequently the function, of a major cancer-causing protein.
Predicting the limits of friction: Sandia looks at properties of material
Sandia National Laboratories materials scientists have developed a model to predict the limits of friction behavior of metals based on materials properties -- how hard you can push on materials or how much current you can put through them before they stop working properly.
PharmaMar presents new data on the treatment of MM and OC at the AACR Congress
PharmaMar has presented new data on the mechanism of action of plitidepsin and lurbinectedin during the Annual Congress of the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR), which is being held in Washington, D.C., on April 1-5.
A step forward to making crops drought tolerant
QUT researchers are part of an international consortium of researchers whose work hopes to future-proof crops against the impacts of global climate change.
Mayo Clinic researchers demonstrate value of second opinions
Many patients come to Mayo Clinic for a second opinion or diagnosis confirmation before treatment for a complex condition.
Computation scientists find social norms required for the transition to cooperative societies
What role the diversity of social norms can play in the process of evolving cooperation by means of evolutionary computation methods.
Regardless of income and age, best investment strategy is to diversify
Michael O'Doherty, associate professor of finance in the Trulaske College of Business, developed a model to determine the optimal retirement savings decisions of households with access to both pre-tax and post-tax accounts.
Penn researchers investigate how songbirds teach themselves songs
Scientists typically think of songbirds' vocal development in terms of how one circuit in the brain learns a song.
A new blue gene: NKPD1 variant increases depression risk
A study of people from an isolated village in the Netherlands reveals a link between rare variants in the gene NKPD1 and depressive symptoms.
Breaking the protein-DNA bond
A new Northwestern University study finds that unbound proteins in a cell break up protein-DNA bonds as they compete for the single-binding site.
Improving silver nanowires for FTCEs with flash light interactions
A Korean research team led by Professor Keon Jae Lee of the Materials Science and Engineering Department at KAIST and Dr.
Granites could solve riddle of pinpointing metals crucial for low carbon tech
The composition of vast swathes of granite found underneath much of the South West peninsula of Britain could offer a vital clue to where deposits of metals crucial for the production of many low carbon technologies can be found.
New type of insulin-producing cell discovered
In people with type I diabetes, insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas die and are not replaced.
Over 10,000 Canadian women per year can stop taking blood thinners for unexplained clots
A Canadian-led research group has developed and validated a rule that could let half of women with unexplained vein blood clots stop taking blood thinners for life.
Study: Liver responds positively to leptin treatment in patients with lipodystrophy
Researchers at Michigan Medicine have found the livers of patients with a rare disease that affects metabolism have responded positively to leptin therapy.
Marker may help predict success with extended-wear contact lenses
A simple marker on eye examination may help vision care professionals predict which patients will have a higher or lower rate of problems after starting extended-wear contact lenses, reports a study in the April issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry.
Researchers offer novel method for calculating the benefits of renewable energy
Researchers from the Higher School of Economics (HSE) have developed a novel system for assessing the potential of renewable energy resources.
Ultrasound and microbubbles flag malignant cancer in humans, Stanford-led study finds
A team led by researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine has demonstrated a way to diagnose cancer without resorting to surgery, raising the possibility of far fewer biopsies.
Less fear: How LSD affects the brain
Scientists at the University of Basel have shown that LSD reduces activity in the region of the brain related to the handling of negative emotions like fear.
Researchers find high cardiovascular risk even in normal weight individuals
A new research study has found that approximately one-third of all individuals with a normal body mass index (BMI) had cardio-metabolic risk factors for heart disease, especially those of South Asian and Hispanic descent.
Be more patient? Imagine that
By using functional MRI (fMRI) to look inside the brain, neuroscientists Adrianna Jenkins, a UC Berkeley postdoctoral researcher, and Ming Hsu, an associate professor of marketing and neuroscience at UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business, found that imagination is a pathway toward patience.
Common antibiotic may help to prevent or treat PTSD
The common antibiotic doxycycline can disrupt the formation of negative associations in the brain, according to new research from UCL and the University of Zurich.
Heart attacks diagnosed quicker by new blood test
Scientists from King's College London have developed a new blood test that is more sensitive in detecting damaged heart muscle caused by a heart attack.
Low-dose penicillin in early life induces long-term behavioral changes
In this paper, the researchers report that low-dose penicillin taken late in pregnancy and in early life of mice offspring, changes behaviour and the balance of microbes in the gut.
Study detects doubly accelerated electrons in collisions of galaxy clusters
A cosmic phenomenon resulting from the acceleration of a gas cloud by a black hole and its reacceleration by the shock waves from the merging of two galaxy clusters, has been described by an international collaboration of astronomers.
Brexit 1.0: Scientists find evidence of Britain's original separation from Europe
Researchers have found evidence of how ancient Britain separated from Europe, which happened in two stages, they report today in Nature Communications.
Researchers develop a new way to study key biological processes
A team of scientists at The University of East Anglia (UEA) has developed a novel way to obtain previously inaccessible insight into the functions of a group of essential proteins.
Laboratory study shows that paternal nutrition affects offsprings' mental fitness
The father's lifestyle affects the cognitive skills of his offspring -- at least in mice.
Treating polycystic ovary syndrome early may help prevent later drop in fertility
In adolescent girls with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), bringing the amount of abdominal visceral fat and liver fat down to normal restores ovulation, normalizes the symptoms of androgen excess, and may help prevent future subfertility, new research from Spain suggests.
Steppe migrant thugs pacified by Stone Age farming women
When present day European genetics was formed during the beginning of the Bronze Age 5,000 years ago it was a result of migrating Yamnaya pastoralists from the Caspian steppe encountering Stone Age farmers in northern and eastern Europe.
Phase II trial: Rice bran adds microbiome diversity, slows growth of colon cancer cells
Today at the AACR, University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers at Colorado State University present results of a phase II clinical trial of 29 people exploring the effects of adding rice bran or navy beans to the diets of colorectal cancer survivors.
Discovery of 'mini-brains' could change understanding of pain medication
The human body's peripheral nervous system could be capable of interpreting its environment and modulating pain, neuroscientists have established, after successfully studying how rodents reacted to stimulation.
How to hack a cell
A new study published by Assistant Professor Wilson Wong in Nature Biotechnology outlines a new simplified platform to target and program mammalian cells as genetic circuits, even complex ones, more quickly and efficiently.
Neptune's journey during early planet formation was 'smooth and calm'
A Queen's University Belfast expert has made a major discovery on the formation of icy bodies within the Kuiper Belt, unlocking unique evidence that Neptune's movement during early planet formation was a 'smooth and calm' journey.
Even 'healthy' weight gain raises pregnancy diabetes risk
Mothers who gain weight in the years leading up to pregnancy have an increased risk of gestational diabetes.
UBC invention uses bacteria to purify water
A University of British Columbia-developed system that uses bacteria to turn non-potable water into drinking water will be tested next week in West Vancouver prior to being installed in remote communities in Canada and beyond.
A self-healing, water-repellant coating that's ultra durable
A self-healing, water-repellent, spray-on coating developed at the University of Michigan is hundreds of times more durable than its counterparts.
New research could help speed up the 3-D printing process
A team of researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York and MIT have identified some bottlenecks in 3-D printers, that, if improved, could speed up the entire process.
Platelets instead of quantum dots
A team of researchers led by ETH Zurich professor David Norris has developed a model to clarify the general mechanism of nanoplatelet formation.
Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation may treat autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes
In this issue of the JCI, researchers in Allan Zhao's lab at Guangdong University of Technology determined that dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids can diminish the inflammatory processes that contribute to development of type I diabetes.
Gray tin exhibits novel topological electronic properties in 3-D
In a surprising new discovery, alpha-tin, commonly called gray tin, exhibits a novel electronic phase when its crystal structure is strained, putting it in a rare new class of 3-D materials called topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs).
Study compares brain atrophy between typical elderly and 'superagers'
Cognitively average elderly adults demonstrated greater annual whole-brain cortical volume loss over 18 months compared with SuperAgers, adults 80 years and older with memory ability at least as good as that of average middle-age adults, according to a study published by JAMA.
Finger prosthesis provides clues to brain health
In a collaboration between Swedish and Italian researchers, the aim was to analyze how the brain interprets information from a virtual experience of touch, created by a finger prosthesis with artificial sensation.
SuperAger brains shrink more slowly than peers' brains
A new path-breaking Northwestern Medicine study that shows that brains of SuperAgers (those 80 years old and older whose memories are as sharp as healthy people in their 50s and 60s) shrink much slower than their age-matched peers, resulting in a greater resistance to 'typical' memory loss and dementia.
Michelangelo's Medici Chapel may contain hidden symbols of female anatomy
Michelangelo often surreptitiously inserted pagan symbols into his works of art, many of them possibly associated with anatomical representations.
How nanoparticles affect flow through porous stuff in surprising ways
Viscous fingering occurs in porous media where fluids of differing viscosity converge in finger-shaped patterns as a result of growing disturbances at the interface.
Kent State archaeologist explains innovation of 'fluting' ancient stone weaponry
Approximately 13,500 years after nomadic Clovis hunters crossed the frozen land bridge from Asia to North America, researchers are still asking questions and putting together clues as to how they not only survived in a new landscape with unique new challenges but adapted with stone tools and weapons to thrive for thousands of years.
Administration of steroid to extremely preterm infants not associated with adverse effects on neurod
The administration of low-dose hydrocortisone to extremely preterm infants was not associated with any adverse effects on neurodevelopmental outcomes at 2 years of age, according to a study published by JAMA.
Children at risk of diabetes should be screened by HbA1C, oral glucose tolerance tests
Doctors should add an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to their hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) when they screen high-risk children for prediabetes and diabetes, new research from South Korea suggests.
Proton beam power boosted with pulsed lasers, promising better proton therapies
A Japan-based research team led by Osaka University demonstrated multiple sharp, ultra-short laser pulses that promise new types of proton-beam systems potentially useful in areas such as cancer treatment.
Majority of incontinence treatments deliver poor results
Surgery is the most reliable method of treatment for incontinence -- curing the condition in just over eight in ten cases; other types of treatment, meanwhile, do not deliver the same kind of success.
The inner lives of molecules
Researchers from Canada, the UK and Germany have developed a new experimental technique to take 3-D images of molecules in action.
Current Graphene Science tours its journey of high-performance energy storage devices
Graphene has made its fathomable pathway over wide range of user-friendly energy storage devices.
Study reveals the multitasking secrets of an RNA-binding protein
Researchers from Princeton University and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences have discovered how a fruit fly protein binds and regulates two different types of RNA target sequence.
Birth weight is risk factor for fatty liver disease in children
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with a cohort of clinical collaborators from across the United States, have demonstrated the impact of low and high birth weights in developing Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), a chronic disease that often leads to a need for organ transplantation.
Participation in a weight management program reduces job absenteeism
Individuals with obesity who enrolled in a structured weight loss program report fewer hours missed from work after six months in the program, according to a study being presented Sunday at the Endocrine Society's 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.
Materials may lead to self-healing smartphones
Taking a cue from the Marvel Universe, researchers report that they have developed a self-healing polymeric material with an eye toward electronics and soft robotics that can repair themselves.
Touch-sensitive, elastic fibers offer new interface for electronics
Researchers have created elastic, touch-sensitive fibers that can interface with electronic devices.
Future CO2 and climate warming potentially unprecedented in 420 million years
New research led by the University of Southampton suggests that, over the next 100 to 200 years, carbon dioxide concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere will head towards values not seen since the Triassic period, 200 million years ago.
Scientists discover biological evidence of 'atypical' chronic fatigue syndrome
Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health are the first to report immune signatures differentiating two subgroups of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS): 'classical' and 'atypical.' This complex, debilitating disease is characterized by symptoms ranging from extreme fatigue after exertion to difficulty concentrating, headaches, and muscle pain.
Choosing the right substrate for the right function
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered a unique molecular mechanism responsible for the substrate preference of ubiquitin-specific proteases.
ER docs can pick your nose
The range of options for medicating emergency patients intranasally has greatly expanded in recent years and can even be preferable for certain patients, including children, according to the results of a paper published online last Thursday in Annals of Emergency Medicine ('When to Pick the Nose: Out-of-Hospital and Emergency Department Intranasal Administration of Medications').
DNA double helix structures crystals
For the first time, engineers of Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen Nürnberg (FAU) have succeeded in producing complex crystal lattices, so-called clathrates, from nanoparticles using DNA strands.
Study reverses thinking on genetic links to stress, depression
For years, scientists have been trying to determine what effect a gene linked to the brain chemical serotonin may have on depression in people exposed to stress.
Call to phase out lead bullets at shooting ranges
While there is no safe level of lead exposure, US health bodies regard 5 micrograms per deciliter of blood as the level that is cause for concern.
Melting snow contains a toxic cocktail of pollutants
With spring finally here and warmer temperatures just around the corner, snow will slowly melt away, releasing us from the clutches of winter.
Global growth of ecological and environmental citizen science is fueled by new technology
Scientists at the UK-based Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) and the Natural History Museum, London have revealed the diversity of ecological and environmental citizen science for the first time and showed that the changing face of citizen science around the world is being fueled by advances in new technology.
Price awareness can be a buzzkill
Our enjoyment of an experience or product decreases more quickly when we are aware of the price.
Urine metabolites may help predict which obese teens will develop diabetes
Researchers have discovered a unique metabolic 'signature' in the urine of diabetic, obese black teenagers that they say may become a way to predict the development of type 2 diabetes in people at risk.
Bio-sensing contact lens could someday measure blood glucose, other bodily functions
Transparent biosensors embedded into contact lenses could soon allow doctors and patients to monitor blood glucose levels and a host of other telltale signs of disease without invasive tests.

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