Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | April 18, 2017


Researchers unlock an immunity 'black box'
Mapping the biological machinery of the inflammatory skin disease neutrophilic dermatosis offers multiple targets for treating inflammatory disorders.
Zinc supply affects cardiac health
In addition to essential metabolic functions, the level of zinc in the body also affects the heart muscle.
Gunshot injuries occur primarily in Miami-Dade's poor, black neighborhoods
Gunshot wound injuries in Miami-Dade County are clustered in predominantly poor, black neighborhoods, according to a new study from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine.
Study on impact of climate change on snowpack loss in Western US
An international team of scientists, including one from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has found that up to 20 percent loss in the annual maximum amount of water contained in the Western United States' mountain snowpack in the last three decades is due to human influences.
Experimental drug targets nucleus of allergen-sensitized cells
Transcription factors, the tiny proteins that switch genes on or off in the nucleus of cells, are considered unreachable molecular targets for drugs attempting to treat medical conditions.
Well-kept vacant lots can help reduce crime
Maintaining the yards of vacant properties helps reduce crime rates in urban neighborhoods, indicates a new Michigan State University study that's the most comprehensive to date.
Adherence to USPSTF recommendations could lead to lower number of individuals recommended for statin
Fewer people could be recommended for primary prevention statin therapy, including many younger adults with high long-term cardiovascular disease risk, if physicians adhere to the 2016 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for statin therapy compared with the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, according to a study published by JAMA.
Researchers identify tactic Dengue virus uses to delay triggering immune response
Mount Sinai researchers describe novel mechanism cells use to recognize earliest stages of infection and how virus evades triggering an immune response.
Emergency departments administering more medications through the nose
Administering medications through the nose as an alternative to injections or IVs is becoming increasingly popular in emergency departments and ambulances, according to a paper by Loyola Medicine pharmacists.
Individualizing health care one byte at a time
Based on a network that finds genes likely to be associated with disease or patient phenotype (symptoms), Robert Hoehndorf, Assistant Professor from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia, his student Imane Boudellioua and several collaborators have developed an algorithm that can identify variants that modify the normal function of a gene associated with a specific disease.
Tracing the puzzling origins of clinging jellyfish
The first genetic study of the diversity of clinging jellyfish populations around the globe has discovered some surprising links among distant communities of jellies and also revealed there may be more than one species of the infamous stinger.
Sat nav for bread wheat uncovers hidden genes
Over two billion people worldwide rely on wheat as a staple food, but attempts to sequence its genome have been thwarted by its complexity.
Liver progenitor cells are involved in the development of hepatic tumors
The malignant transformation of hepatocytes is the origin of most hepatocellular carcinomas, an aggressive type of liver cancer with high mortality rates.
Paper: Nutrition label readers favor food quality over quantity
Although nutrition-label users eat roughly the same amount of food as less-discerning diners, the two groups diverge when it comes to the quality of the food they eat, says a new paper co-written by Brenna Ellison, a professor of agriculture and consumer economics at Illinois and an expert in consumer food preferences and behaviors.
Busy city living makes some house finches more savvy than others
House finches that frequent North American cities and towns are better at solving problems than their rural counterparts.
Two in the pack: No changes for Isle Royale wolves
Researchers from Michigan Technological University have released the annual Winter Study detailing updates on the ecology of Isle Royale National Park.
Making oil from algae -- towards more efficient biofuels
The mechanism behind oil synthesis within microalgae cells has been revealed by a Japanese research team.
Vanderbilt research unlocks molecular key to animal evolution and disease
The dawn of the Animal Kingdom began with a collagen scaffold that enabled the organization of cells into tissues.
High-fat, high-carb diet a cause of osteoarthritis
Saturated fat is a prime suspect in the onset of osteoarthritis after QUT scientists found it changed the composition of cartilage, particularly in the weight-bearing joints of the hip and knee.
CNIC scientists discover how a decades-old drug reduces the size of a heart attack
The beta-blocker metoprolol can limit cardiac damage in patients having a heart attack.
Researchers find strong link between fast-food ads and consumption among pre-schoolers
Pre-school age children who are exposed to child-targeted fast-food advertising on television are considerably more likely to consume fast-food products, according to a recent Dartmouth-led study in the journal Public Health Nutrition.
Frog slime kills flu virus
Frogs' skins were known to secrete peptides that defend them against bacteria.
Climate change and risk to fossil fuel industry: Sustainability train has left the station
Two seminal articles by energy experts in the latest issue of MRS Energy and Sustainability (MRS E&S) examine the climate-related risks facing the fossil fuel industry and conclude that the sustainability train has already well and truly left the station -- and is not coming back.
NREL researchers capture excess photon energy to produce solar fuels
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a proof-of-principle photoelectrochemical cell capable of capturing excess photon energy normally lost to generating heat.
Origins of an enigmatic genus of Asian butterflies carrying mythological names decoded
A group of rare Asian butterflies, which have once inspired an association with Hindu mythological creatures, have been quite a chaos for the experts.
Understanding decisions: The power of combining psychology and economics
A new paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows how collaborations between psychologists and economists lead to better understanding of such decisions than either discipline can on its own.
Lasers measure jet disintegration
The study of jet disintegration in particular focuses on fuel breakup and mixing within the combustion chamber of propulsion devices.
UNH helps lead the way for campuses to measure their nitrogen footprints
Sustainability leadership efforts at the University of New Hampshire have contributed to a groundbreaking initiative to measure and reduce the nitrogen footprint left behind by campus activities like food waste and energy consumption.
New brain research reveals that motor neurons adjust to control tasks
New research from Carnegie Mellon University's College of Engineering and the University of Pittsburgh reveals that motor cortical neurons optimally adjust how they encode movements in a task-specific manner.
A potential cure for metastatic prostate cancer? Treatment combination shows early promise
In the past, all forms of metastatic prostate cancer have been considered incurable.
Study finds amoeba 'grazing,' killing bacteria usually protected by fi
A University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of bacteriology has shown the first proof that a certain group of amoeba called dictyostelids can penetrate biofilms and eat the bacteria within.
Researchers quantify grasslands' carbon storage value
Grasslands that feature diverse plant species have more carbon storage capacity than less-diverse grasslands, largely because the former produce more biomass, the researchers say.
Study examines effectiveness of steroid medication for sore throat
In patients with a sore throat that didn't require immediate antibiotics, a single capsule of the corticosteroid dexamethasone didn't increase the likelihood of complete symptom resolution after 24 hours, and although more patients taking the steroid reported feeling completely better after 48 hours, a role for steroids to treat sore throats in primary care is uncertain, according to a study published by JAMA.
For young adults, cigarettes more pleasurable with alcohol than with pot
Young adults get more pleasure from smoking cigarettes while they are drinking alcohol than they do while using marijuana, according to a new UC San Francisco study.
Cannabinoids may soothe certain skin diseases, say CU Anschutz researchers
Cannabinoids contain anti-inflammatory properties that could make them useful in the treatment of a wide-range of skin diseases, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.
Predictive power
The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors carried out the largest time-dependent simulation of a nuclear reactor ever to support Tennessee Valley Authority and Westinghouse Electric Company during the startup of Watts Bar Unit 2, the first new US nuclear reactor in 20 years.
Can barnacle geese predict the climate?
The breeding grounds of Arctic migratory birds such as the barnacle goose are changing rapidly due to accelerated warming in the polar regions.
Adjusting solar panel angles a few times a year makes them more efficient
With Earth Day approaching, new research from Binghamton University-State of New York could help US residents save more energy, regardless of location, if they adjust the angles of solar panels four to five times a year.
Banning transshipment at-sea necessary to curb illegal fishing, researchers conclude
Banning transshipment at-sea -- the transfer of fish and supplies from one vessel to another in open waters -- is necessary to diminish illegal fishing, a team of researchers has concluded after an analysis of existing maritime regulations.
Birds sing shorter songs in response to traffic noise
Birds sing differently in response to traffic noise, which potentially affects their ability to attract mates and defend their territory, according to research published in Bioacoustics.
Rapid screening machine can read and separate protein sequences
The structural properties of proteins that could eventually become important materials for manufacturing and medicine are revealed by a novel optical technique that works rapidly to sort through amino acid sequences even inside living bacteria, according to a team of engineers.
Signs point to reduced drinking by pregnant women
The signage varies but the message is working. Drinking by pregnant women is down 11 percent in states requiring point-of-sale warning signs, says a health economist at the University of Oregon.
Inflammatory bowel diseases on the rise in very young Canadian children
Canada has among the highest rates of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the world, and the number of children under five years old being diagnosed increased by 7.2 percent every year between 1999 to 2010.
Hydrogen halo lifts the veil of our galactic home
UA astronomers Huanian Zhang and Dennis Zaritsky have reported the first detections of diffuse hydrogen wafting about in a vast halo surrounding the Milky Way.
Both low and high birth weight linked to fatty liver disease in children
Both high and low birth weights show increased risk for developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
Common antibiotic azithromycin not linked to increased risk of abnormal heartbeat
The commonly used antibiotic azithromycin is not linked to an increased risk of ventricular arrhythmia, an often life-threatening rapid, irregular heartbeat, according to a large study published in CMAJ.
Chaining up diarrhea pathogens
Researchers have clarified how vaccinations can combat bacterial intestinal diseases: vaccine-induced antibodies in the intestine chain up pathogens as they grow in the intestine, which prevents disease and surprisingly also hinders the spread of antibiotic resistance.
Master detox molecule boosts immune defenses
Scientists of the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) have discovered an unknown molecular mechanism promoting the activation of the human immune system.
Canary in the kelp forest
The one-two punch of warming waters and ocean acidification is predisposing some marine animals to dissolving quickly under conditions already occurring off the Northern California coast, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.
Fainting episodes may increase risk of workplace accidents, job loss
People who experience fainting spells have a higher risk of workplace accidents and job loss, compared to adults who do not have fainting episodes.
New test identifies patients with diabetes who are at high risk of kidney failure
Two biomarkers -- urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) and estimated glomerular filtration rate -- are used to identify those at higher risk of kidney failure.
Killing flu viruses with help from a frog
Frog mucus is loaded with molecules that kill bacteria and viruses, and researchers are beginning to investigate it as a potential source for new anti-microbial drugs.
Scientists identify neural basis for parasitic cowbird's secret password
Scientists identify neural basis for parasitic cowbird's secret password.
Protein primes mouse stem cells to quickly repair injury, Stanford study finds
Like drag car racers revving their engines at the starting line, stem cells respond more quickly to injury when they've been previously primed with one dose of a single protein, according to a study from the Stanford University School of Medicine.
Researchers describe ultrasensitive detection of protein linked to multiple autoimmune diseases
Researchers in France have developed a new method that will allow doctors to detect minute amounts of a protein called interferon- in patient samples.
What makes pancreatic cancer so aggressive?
Pancreatic cancer starts forming metastases early. The cancer itself, however, is usually only discovered late.
Pigeon study takes on sexism in science
In experimental research, scientists tend to assume that male and female animals are alike, and mostly use males.
Megafaunal extinctions driven by too much moisture
Studies of bones from Ice Age megafaunal animals across Eurasia and the Americas have revealed that major increases in environmental moisture occurred just before many species suddenly became extinct around 11-15,000 years ago.
NASA measures rainfall rates in Tropical Cyclone Maarutha
Tropical Storm Maarutha became the first tropical cyclone of 2017 in the Bay of Bengal when it formed on April 15, 2017.
Prescribed forest fire frequency should be based on land management goals
Researchers at the University of Missouri have studied forests subjected to different frequencies of fires to determine what effects fire can have on oak forests over long periods of time.
Taxes to reduce obesity and diabetes: The sweet spot in Berkeley, Calif.
Many countries are considering or already implementing taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) in an effort to curb increasing levels of obesity and type 2 diabetes.
Sea scorpions: The original sea monster
Related to both modern scorpions and horseshow crabs, sea scorpions had thin, flexible bodies.
'Gamers' method creates unique 4-D molecular spectral maps
Researchers at Northwestern University have created a new method to extract the static and dynamic structure of complex chemical systems.
Antidepressant use during pregnancy not associated with increased risk of autism, ADHD in children
Two studies published by JAMA examine the risk of autism and other adverse birth outcomes among women who use antidepressants during pregnancy.
New method can model chemistry in extreme magnetic fields of white dwarfs
Approximately 10-20 percent of white dwarfs exhibit strong magnetic fields, which can reach up to 100,000 tesla.
Homing pigeons share our human ability to build knowledge across generations
Homing pigeons may share the human capacity to build on the knowledge of others, improving their navigational efficiency over time, a new Oxford University study has found.
Bacteriophages, natural drugs to combat superbugs
Viruses that specifically kill bacteria, called bacteriophages, might one day help solve the growing problem of bacterial infections that are resistant to antibiotic treatment.
Captive meerkats at risk of stress
Small groups of meerkats -- such as those commonly seen in zoos and safari parks -- are at greater risk of chronic stress, new research suggests.
Better living through pressure: Functional nanomaterials made easy
Using pressure instead of chemicals, nanoparticles have been fabricated into nanowire arrays similar to those that underlie touch-screens for phones, computers, TVs, and sensors.
NREL establishes world record for solar hydrogen production
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recaptured the record for highest efficiency in solar hydrogen production via a photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-splitting process.
Epidemiologists call for more visibility of Arab Americans and their health issues
A group of epidemiologists are advocating for the increased visibility of, and focus on, Arab Americans in discussions about mental and physical health issues in the US, in an article published in the American Journal of Preventative Medicine.
Oral contraceptives reduce general well-being in healthy women
One of the most common combined oral contraceptive pills has a negative impact on women's quality of life but does not increase depressive symptoms.
NASA sees lingering remnants of Tropical Cyclone 02W
The remnant clouds associated with former Tropical Cyclone 02W continued to linger in the South China Sea when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
NREL's new perovskite ink opens window for quality cells
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a new perovskite ink with a long processing window that allows the scalable production of perovskite thin films for high-efficiency solar cells.
UTSA professor's study describes new way to predict tumor growth
A new study by Yusheng Feng, professor of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), describes an algorithm that can predict the growth of cancerous tumors, which could help medical professionals judge the best treatment options for patients.
Researchers discover mitochondrial 'circuit breaker' that protects heart from damage
A team of scientists from the National Institutes of Health has discovered biological mechanisms that appear to prevent damage to the heart muscle's 'power grid,' the network of mitochondrial circuits that provide energy to cells.
New study offers good news for pork producers
What happens when meat scientists get their hands on nearly 8,000 commercially raised pigs?
Cannabis-based medicine may cut seizures in half for those with tough-to-treat epilepsy
Taking cannabidiol may cut seizures in half for some children and adults with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a severe form of epilepsy, according to new information released today from a large scale controlled clinical study that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22-28, 2017.
Hopkins researchers discover birth-and-death life cycle of neurons in the adult mouse gut
Johns Hopkins researchers today published new evidence refuting the long-held scientific belief that the gut nerve cells we're born with are the same ones we die with.
Narcissism and social networking
Social networks are an ideal stage for narcissists to showcase themselves.
Study: Antidepressant use in early pregnancy does not increase autism, ADHD risk in kids
A study led by Indiana University reported today in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggests that mothers' use of antidepressants during early pregnancy does not increase the risk of their children developing autism or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, conditions previously associated with these medications.
Arctic river ice deposits rapidly disappearing
Climate change is causing thick ice deposits that form along Arctic rivers to melt nearly a month earlier than they did 15 years ago, a new study finds.
Poor sleep in anxiety, depression may make it harder to see positive
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have found that the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex may have to work harder to modify negative emotional responses in people with poor sleep who have depression or anxiety.
Charisma-challenged? You can still be a good boss
You don't need the charisma of Steve Jobs to be an effective boss, indicates new research led by Michigan State University business scholars.
Acute exposure to Vype vapor has limited impact on gene expression in human lung cells
New research shows that at equivalent or higher doses of nicotine, acute exposure to e-cigarette vapor has very limited impact on gene expression compared to cigarette smoke.
Air pollution may directly cause those year-round runny noses, according to a mouse study
Although human population studies have linked air pollution to chronic inflammation of nasal and sinus tissues, direct biological and molecular evidence for cause and effect has been scant.
New mechanism to fight multi-resistant bacteria revealed
In recent years scientists, clinicians and pharmaceutical companies have been struggling to find new antibiotics or alternative strategies against multi-drug resistant bacteria that represent nowadays a serious health problem.
Cytokine controls immune cells that trigger inflammatory bowel disease, study finds
A certain cytokine, or small protein that helps cells communicate during immune responses, can control whether immune cells promote or suppress inflammatory bowel disease, a finding that could lead to new treatments, according to a study led by Georgia State University.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Meditations on Loneliness
Original broadcast date: April 24, 2020. We're a social species now living in isolation. But loneliness was a problem well before this era of social distancing. This hour, TED speakers explore how we can live and make peace with loneliness. Guests on the show include author and illustrator Jonny Sun, psychologist Susan Pinker, architect Grace Kim, and writer Suleika Jaouad.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.