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Science News and Current Events for April 24, 2017


Growing body of evidence supports use of mind-body therapies in breast cancer treatment
In newly updated clinical guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology (SIO), researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues analyzed which integrative treatments are most effective and safe for patients with breast cancer.
A CSIC scientist discovers that wax worms eat plastic
A research scientist at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Federica Bertocchini, has discovered that wax worms (Galleria mellonella), which usually feed on honey and wax from the honeycombs of bees, are capable of degrading plastic.
New strategy produces stronger polymers
MIT researchers have found a way to reduce the number of loops in polymer networks such as gels, plastics, and rubber.
New insight into brain development disorder
Two years ago, the Zika virus drew attention to microcephaly, a developmental disorder in which the brain and skull display inhibited growth.
Study identifies hundreds of genes that influence timing of puberty
The largest genomic analysis of puberty timing in men and women conducted to date has identified 389 genetic signals associated with puberty timing, four times the number that were previously known.
Nurse practitioners are not regularly assessing brain health and need standardized assessment tools to regularly conduct critical brain health assessments
WomenAgainstAlzheimer's and the National Association of Nurse Practitioners in Women's Health are releasing survey findings showing that a significant number of nurse practitioners in women's health do not raise brain health issues with patients and need more education and tools to make brain health assessments a regular occurrence.
Skin stem cells used to generate new brain cells
Using human skin cells, University of California, Irvine neurobiologists and their colleagues have created a method to generate one of the principle cell types of the brain called microglia, which play a key role in preserving the function of neural networks and responding to injury and disease.
Facial expressions: How brains process emotion
New research from Caltech clarifies the once-mysterious role of the amygdala.
Does the microbiome play a role in the effectiveness of colorectal cancer treatment?
A study by UMass Medical School shows that C. elegans, fed a diet of E. coli bacteria, are 100 times more sensitive to the chemotherapy drug floxuridine, commonly used to treat colon cancer, than worms fed different bacteria.
Growth under pressure: New metamaterial designed with counterintuitive property
Inspired by 3-D printing, researchers explored development of one mechanical property called effective static compressibility.
Bright future for self-charging batteries
Who hasn't lived through the frustrating experience of being without a phone after forgetting to recharge it?
Patients in team-based practices less likely to visit ED after hospital discharge
Older patients enrolled in team-based primary care practices in Quebec had similar rates of hospital readmission, and lower rates of emergency department visits and death after hospital discharge, compared with those in traditional fee-for-service practices, found a study published in Canadian Medical Association Journal.
Orange essential oil may help alleviate post-traumatic stress disorder
PTSD will affect about 8 percent of people during their lives.
New Canadian guideline: No screening for hepatitis C in adults not at increased risk
The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care recommends against screening for chronic hepatitis C virus in adults at low risk in a guideline published in Canadian Medical Association Journal.
Research moves closer to unraveling mystery cause of multiple sclerosis
Ahead of MS Awareness Week, which starts today (Monday, April 24), an international team involving the University of Exeter Medical School and the University of Alberta has discovered a new cellular mechanism -- an underlying defect in brain cells -- that may cause the disease, and a potential hallmark that may be a target for future treatment of the autoimmune disorder.
Self-assembled nanostructures can be selectively controlled
Plasmonic nanoparticles exhibit properties based on their geometries and relative positions.
Mystery of the missing mercury at the Great Salt Lake
Around 2010, the deep waters of Utah's Great Salt Lake contained high levels of toxic methylmercury.
Competition limits self-interests that pose potential problems for corporations
New research by an Iowa State University professor of management examines how competing interests within an organization can limit egregious unethical behavior.
Caterpillar found to eat shopping bags, suggesting biodegradable solution to plastic pollution
A common insect larva that eats beeswax has been found to break down chemical bonds in the plastic used for packaging and shopping bags at uniquely high speeds.
Patients with drug-resistant malaria cured by plant therapy developed at WPI
When the standard malaria medications failed to help 18 critically ill patients, the attending physician in a Congo clinic acted under the 'compassionate use' doctrine and prescribed a not-yet-approved malaria therapy made only from the dried leaves of the Artemisia annua plant.
Link found between financial strain and low-birth-weight babies
A financially strapped pregnant woman's worries about the arrival and care of her little one could contribute to birth of a smaller, medically vulnerable infant, a new study suggests.
University of Louisville researchers find readiness of public access AEDs alarmingly low
Brad Sutton, M.D., and colleagues find that regions where there is a high degree of unregistered automated external defibrillators also show a much greater chance that these devices will fail if needed.
How fear of death affects human attitudes toward animal life
When reminded of death, humans become more likely to support the killing of animals, no matter how they feel about animal rights, University of Arizona researchers found.
Mayo research shows surgery adds years for kidney cancer patients
Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered that surgery could more than double life expectancy for many patients with late-stage kidney cancer, giving them anywhere from two to almost 10 years more than they'd have without the surgery.
Cleveland Clinic researchers show dietary choline and TMAO linked with increased blood clotting
Cleveland Clinic researchers have shown, for the first time in humans, that choline is directly linked to increased production of a gut bacteria byproduct that increases the risk of blood-clotting events like heart attack and stroke.
Freezing lithium batteries may make them safer and bendable
Columbia Engineering Professor Yuan Yang has developed a new method that could lead to lithium batteries that are safer, have longer battery life, and are bendable, providing new possibilities such as flexible smartphones.
Photosynthesis in the dark? Unraveling the mystery of algae evolution
Researchers compared the photosynthetic regulation in glaucophytes with that in cyanobacteria, to elucidate the changes caused by symbiosis in the interaction between photosynthetic electron transfer and other metabolic pathways.
How walking benefits the brain
You probably know that walking does your body good, but it's not just your heart and muscles that benefit.
Forging new defenses against diabetic kidney disease
Scientists at Joslin Diabetes Center have revealed an unexpected route to slow the progression of diabetic kidney disease, targeting a biological pathway that is the main channel for the metabolism of glucose in the cell.
New approach to improve detection of landfill-related pollution
A method known as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) offers a cleaner, faster and simpler approach than existing technologies for detecting contaminants in the fluids coming from landfills, known as leachates.
Frozen fruits and vegetables help Americans achieve nutrition goals
New research presented today via poster presentation at the 2017 Experimental Biology meeting shows consumers who eat frozen fruits and vegetables eat more fruits and vegetables overall.
Climate change predicted to increase Nile flow variability
The unpredictable annual flow of the Nile River is legendary, as evidenced by the story of Joseph and the Pharaoh, whose dream foretold seven years of abundance followed by seven years of famine in a land whose agriculture was, and still is, utterly dependent on that flow.
Genetics are key to hormone therapy lowering risk of broken bones in older women
Women at the highest genetic risk for fracture benefit the most from hormone therapy, according to a first-of-its-kind study led by researchers at the University at Buffalo.
Research from Sandia shows brain stimulation during training boosts performance
New research from Sandia published in Neuropsychologia shows that working memory training combined with a kind of noninvasive brain stimulation can lead to cognitive improvement under certain conditions.
Few studies consider hearing loss when assessing communication with physicians
Doctors believe that communication with those under their care is important, but most studies of communication between physicians and older adults do not mention that hearing loss may affect this interaction.
Maternal high-fat diet may increase offspring risk for liver disease
A new mouse study suggests that exposure to a high-fat diet in the womb and immediately after birth promotes more rapid progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease later in life.
University of Montana researcher: Heavy precipitation speeds carbon exchange in tropics
New research by the University of Montana and its partner institutions gives insight into how forests globally will respond to long-term climate change.
Stem cells help researchers identify neuronal defects causing Angelman syndrome
Researchers at UConn Health used stem cells derived from patients with Angelman syndrome to identify the underlying neuronal defects that cause the rare neurogenetic disorder, an important step in the ongoing search for potential treatments for Angelman and a possible cure.
Reducing down to one-third of thermal resistance by WOW technology for 3-D DRAM application
Researchers at Tokyo institute of Technology presented a design guide for reducing 30 percent of thermal resistance for three-dimensional stacked devices compared with the conventional ICs using solder bump joint structure.
Brain's power to adapt offers short-term gains, long-term strains
Like air-traffic controllers scrambling to reconnect flights when a major hub goes down, the brain has a remarkable ability to rewire itself after suffering an injury.
Hormone-influenced social strategies shape human social hierarchy, study shows
In a game of chicken, the most aggressive players are fueled by testosterone and are more willing to harm others; and while it may be easy to demonize such hawkish behaviors, psychology researchers from The University of Texas at Austin say there is sound evolutionary reason for their existence.
Researchers develop eco-friendly, 4-in-1 catalyst
Performing multiple reactions in one shot reduces raw material needs and byproduct waste, a potential step toward a greener chemical industry.
Gallbladder cancer rates decreasing in men, not women; late-stage diagnosis on the rise
Gallbladder cancer is a rare, but aggressive disease. A new study by University of Missouri School of Medicine researchers has found that gallbladder cancer rates have decreased in men in recent years but not in women.
'Alarmingly high' risk of death for people with opioid use disorder in general medical care
Almost one-fifth of patients with opioid use disorder (OUD) in a large healthcare system died during a four-year follow-up period, reports a study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM).
Penn team identifies genetic target for growing hardier plants under stress
In a new investigation, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania identified two proteins that regulate whether a cell in plant roots forms a hair cell, which increases surface area for absorption, or a non-hair cell.
Chip-based nanoscopy: Microscopy in HD quality
Physicists at Bielefeld University and the Arctic University of Norway in Tromsø have developed a photonic chip that makes it possible to carry out super-resolution light microscopy, also called 'nanoscopy,' with conventional microscopes.
NASA's Cassini, Voyager missions suggest new picture of sun's interaction with galaxy
New data from three NASA missions show that the heliosphere -- the bubble of the sun's magnetic influence that surrounds the inner solar system -- may be much more compact and rounded than previously thought.
Graphene withstands high pressure, may aid in desalination
Used in filtration membranes, ultrathin material could help make desalination more productive.
Can household routines and self-regulation in early childhood prevent later obesity?
Toddlers who go to bed at regular times, and are better able to control and regulate their own emotions, are less likely to develop into obese pre-teens.
Guts and glory for RMIT smart pills
Australian researchers have successfully completed phase one human trials of ingestible capsules that have the potential to revolutionise the prevention and diagnosis of gut disorders and diseases.
Interdisciplinary studies reveal relationship between solar activity and climate change
A Chinese Program examined the impacts of astronomy and earth motion factors on climate change.
The fading American dream: Economic mobility has nearly halved since 1940
The probability for children to attain a higher income than their parents has dropped dramatically -- from more than 90 percent for children born in 1940 to 50 percent for children born in the 1980s -- according to a new study analyzing US data.
After the death of a friend, healing in a human social network
The first large-scale study of recovery and resilience after a death in a friend group -- based on analysis of interactions in 15,000 anonymized networks on Facebook -- finds that when a friend dies, we get closer to that person's friends.
A cancer in the family: One spouse's diagnosis can lower household income
Caring for a husband or wife with cancer significantly diminishes family income, according to researchers from the University of Georgia, who tracked changes in employment and income among working-age couples in Canada.
Disease-associated genes routinely missed in some genetic studies
New research reveals two new ways to identify genes that routinely are missed in studies using a common gene-sequencing method.
'Race tests' may be fueling segregation in white evangelical churches
A new study explores why nominally welcoming churches remain racially segregated in the post-civil rights era.
Banded mongooses target family members for eviction
Banded mongooses target close female relatives when violently ejecting members from their social groups, University of Exeter scientists have found.
Lyme disease researchers seek consensus as number of cases grows
Scientists have built a large body of knowledge about Lyme disease over the past 40 years, yet controversies remain and the number of cases continues to rise.
Citizens can productively change politics by taking the law to court
When public goods like clean water, air, and health care compete with funding for particular districts, citizen lawsuits can tilt the legislative process toward a middle ground.
Alternating skimpy sleep with sleep marathons hurts attention, creativity in young adults
Skimping on sleep, followed by 'catch-up' days with long snoozes, is tied to worse cognition -- both in attention and creativity -- in young adults, in particular those tackling major projects, Baylor University researchers have found.
First-ever direct observation of chiral currents in quantum Hall atomic simulation
Using an atomic quantum simulator, scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have achieved the first-ever direct observation of chiral currents in the model topological insulator, the 2-D integer quantum Hall system.
How do patients, clinicians feel about collecting sexual orientation data?
Patients are more willing to disclose their sexual orientation in the emergency department than many health care professionals thought, according to a new article published by JAMA Internal Medicine.
Metastatic breast cancers: Characterizing the profile of metastases for improved treatment
Researchers at the Jules Bordet Institute - Université libre de Bruxelles, VIB and KU Leuven published this 21 of April an important study offering a better understanding of the progression of breast cancer.
New breakthrough in battery charging technology
A new study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), introduced a new battery charging technology that uses light to charge batteries.
Medicare recipients using rehabilitation services report major functional improvements
A new study showing significant patient-reported functional improvement among Medicare recipients who utilize rehabilitation services offers hope for America's 65-and-older set, which is expected to double by 2050.
Statins may benefit cirrhotic patients with Hepatitis B or C infections
Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) can lead to cirrhosis as well as liver cancer.
Little kids' regular bedtimes and ability to regulate emotions may lessen obesity risk
Family structure including regular bedtimes, mealtimes and limited screen time appear to be linked to better emotional health in preschoolers, and that might lower the chances of obesity later, a new study suggests.
Researchers invent process to make sustainable rubber, plastics
Synthetic rubber and plastics -- used for manufacturing tires, toys and myriad other products -- are produced from butadiene, a molecule traditionally made from petroleum or natural gas.
JAMA study, clinical trials offer fresh hope for kids with rare brain disease
Anna Gunby can't run around as smoothly as most 4-year-olds because her wobbly legs are affected by a rare brain disease that also hinders her intellect.
Motion sickness drug worsens motion perception
A new study led by Massachusetts Eye and Ear researchers found that oral promethazine, a drug commonly taken to alleviate motion sickness, temporarily worsened vestibular perception thresholds by 31 percent, lowering one's ability to perceive sensory information about motion, balance and spatial orientation.
A rocky super-earth has been found in the habitable zone of a cool star close to the sun
In September 2014 MEarth detected a possible transit in the star named LHS 1140.
Researchers solve the century-old mystery of Blood Falls
A research team led by the University of Alaska Fairbanks and Colorado College has solved a century-old mystery involving a famous red waterfall in Antarctica.
Most new to Medicaid have no other option if Affordable Care Act repealed
Almost everyone covered through Ohio's Medicaid expansion would have no other viable insurance option should the Affordable Care Act be repealed, a new study has found.
Gene may hold key to hearing recovery
Researchers have discovered that a protein implicated in human longevity may also play a role in restoring hearing after noise exposure.
Inflammatory pathways link to obsessive behaviors in a common form of dementia
Scientists from the Gladstone Institutes identified that mutations in a protein commonly linked to frontotemporal dementia (FTD) result in obsessive-like behaviors.
A plastic-eating caterpillar
Generally speaking, plastic is incredibly resistant to breaking down. That's certainly true of the trillion polyethylene plastic bags that people use each and every year.
Disney projection system shines makeup on actors during live performances
The facial appearance of actors can be transformed during live stage performances using a new advanced system developed by a team at Disney Research that can track an actor's movements and changing expressions so that the face can be painted with light, rather than physical makeup.
Study: Stressing about finances can be harmful to a baby's health
It's normal for expectant moms to worry about how their new arrival will affect their family's budget -- but a new study shows how financial stress can affect the health of the baby.
New function discovered for ADAR1 in protecting stressed cells from apoptotic death
The RNA editing protein ADAR1 was first discovered several decades ago.
Methadone may reduce need for opioids after surgery
Patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery who are treated with methadone during the procedure require significantly less intravenous and oral opioids to manage postoperative pain, reports a new study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA).
Military service boosts resilience, well-being among transgender veterans
Transgender people make up a small percentage of active-duty US military personnel, but their experience in the service may yield long-term, positive effects on their mental health and quality of life.
Discovery offers new hope to repair spinal cord injuries
Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes created a special type of neuron from human stem cells that could potentially repair spinal cord injuries.
Limiting patient mobility in hospitals may do more harm than good
Despite hospitals' best efforts, there is little proof that policies to inhibit patient mobility actually prevent falls and may actually increase the risk of serious side effects, according to Sharon K.
Solving the hepatitis C epidemic among people with substance abuse disorders
One of the most dramatic medical success stories in recent years has been the introduction of new drugs that eradicate hepatitis C virus (HCV).
Scientists reveal a new mechanism mediating environment-microbe-host interactions
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have uncovered a new mechanism showing how microbes can alter the physiology of the organisms in which they live.
T cell revival correlates with lung cancer response to PD-1 immunotherapy
In lung cancer patients who were taking immunotherapy drugs targeting the PD-1 pathway, testing for CD8 T cell activation in their blood partially predicted whether their tumors would shrink.
Chili peppers and marijuana calm the gut
You wouldn't think chili peppers and marijuana have much in common.
NASA's Fermi catches gamma-ray flashes from tropical storms
A thousand times a day, thunderstorms around the globe launch fleeting bursts of gamma rays.
Russian scientists create new system of concrete building structures
Professor of the Institute of Civil Engineering of Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) Andrey Ponomarev and a graduate student Alexander Rassokhin developed a new construction technology.
Starvation prompts body temperature, blood sugar changes to tolerate next food limitation
Rats that have experienced past episodes of limited food resources make physiological adaptations that may extend their lives the next time they are faced with starvation.
Climate change clues revealed by ice sheet collapse
The rapid decline of ancient ice sheets could help scientists predict the impact of modern-day climate and sea-level change, according to research by the universities of Stirling in Scotland and Tromsø in Norway.
Images of health risks make indoor tanning messages more effective
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report in a new study that anti-tanning bed messages with images showing longer-term health effects, such as skin cancer or wrinkles, produced greater negative emotional reactions and higher ratings of effectiveness in a survey of female college students.
Nature plants a seed of engineering inspiration
Researchers in South Korea have quantitatively deconstructed what they describe as the 'ingenious mobility strategies' of seeds that self-burrow rotationally into soil.
Women in a tenure committee may even make it more difficult for a woman to get a job
Having women in scientific committees may decrease women's opportunities to get a nomination for a professor.
Tiny 'cages' could keep vaccines safe at high temperatures
Vaccines and antibodies could be transported and stored without refrigeration by capturing them in tiny silica 'cages', a discovery which could make getting vital medicines to patients much easier, cheaper and safer.
Higher prostate cancer risks for black men may warrant new approach to screening
A new study indicates that higher prostate cancer death rates among black men in the US may be due to a higher risk of developing preclinical prostate cancer as well as a higher risk of that cancer progressing more quickly to advanced stages.
Pediatric clinic support boosts mental health for youth
A new study led by researchers at San Diego State University suggests that providing a brief behavioral therapy in the pediatric primary care setting is often better than referring to outpatient services for young people struggling with depression and anxiety.
The initial collision between Indian and Asian continental
A recent research reveals that India-Eurasia continental collided first in central Tibet at about 65 Ma (SCES, No.3, 2017).
Facing nightmare scenarios before discharge lifts confidence of parents of babies in NICU
The key to improving confidence among parents of ill or premature infants may lie in simulated care, found new research led by University at Buffalo nursing researcher Deborah Raines.
Robot radiology: Low-cost AI could screen for cervical cancer better than humans
A result of 10 years work, Lehigh University's Sharon Xiaolei Huang and her team have created a cervical cancer screening technique that, based on an analysis of a very large dataset, has the potential to perform as well or better than human interpretation on other traditional screening results, such as Pap tests and HPV tests -- at a much lower cost.
ELC R&D showcases research linking environmental factors/biological processes to skin and hair aging
The Estée Lauder Companies Research & Development (R&D) will present six abstracts posters focused on new findings in anti-aging skin and hair research at the 76th Annual Meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology (SID), April 26-29, 2017, in Portland, Ore.
Measuring immune response could be key to differentiating malaria from other infections
Analyzing a patient's immune response could be key to quickly and accurately diagnosing malaria, according to research presented on World Malaria Day at the 27th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.
Research finds new info about higher number of male babies of Indian-born women in Canada
The researchers who reported last year that more male babies than expected were being born to Indian-born women living in Canada have now found the numbers are driven by women whose mother tongue is Punjabi and, to a lesser extent, Hindi.
The placebo effect can mend a broken heart too, CU Boulder study shows
Feeling heartbroken from a recent breakup? Just believing you're doing something to help yourself get over your ex can influence brain regions associated with emotional regulation and lessen the perception of pain.
The Radiohead ant: A new species of 'silky' ant grows fungus gardens for food
A new species of silky ant has been named after the famous British band Radiohead in honor of the musicians' environmental efforts, especially in raising climate-change awareness.
LGB and straight patients more willing to disclose sexual orientation than providers expect
A new publication from the EQUALITY Study highlights the discordant views of patients and providers on the topic of collecting SO information in the Emergency Department (ED).
Revealing polymeric fluids behavior at the microscopic scale
OIST researchers develop better tools to characterize polymer solutions using microfluidic platforms, promising improvements in healthcare applications.
Physical activity may ward off heart damage
Physical activity can lower the risk of heart damage in middle-aged and older adults and reduce the levels of heart damage in people who are obese, according to research published today in JACC: Heart Failure.
Disney method enables more realistic hair simulation
When a person has a bad hair day, that's unfortunate.
Brain circuit enables split-second decisions when cues conflict
MIT researchers have identified a circuit in the brain that is critical for governing how we respond to conflicting environmental cues.
What can we learn from dinosaur proteins?
Researchers recently confirmed it is possible to extract proteins from 80-million-year-old dinosaur bones.
Nanosponges lessen severity of streptococcal infections
In a new study, researchers show that engineered nanosponges can reduce the severity of infections caused by the bacteria responsible for strep throat and flesh-eating disease.
Mothers' relationship happiness may influence infant fussiness
How happy a mother is in her relationship and the social support she receives may affect the risk of infant colic, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
Malaria sickening thousands in US and racking up millions in healthcare costs, new study finds
A new study published today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene shows that malaria led to a count of hospitalized patients and deaths that easily eclipsed other travel-related illness and generated about half a billion dollars in healthcare costs in the US over a 15-year period.
West Virginia groundwater not affected by fracking, but surface water is
Three years of fracking has not contaminated groundwater in northwestern West Virginia, but accidental spills of wastewater from fracked wells may pose a threat to surface water, according to a study led by scientists at Duke University.
Nanoparticle vaccine shows potential as immunotherapy to fight multiple cancer types
Researchers from UT Southwestern Medical Center have developed a first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine immunotherapy that targets several different cancer types.
Genetic factors may contribute to adverse effects produced by synthetic cannabinoids
Synthetic cannabinoid abuse is a growing problem in the US.
Does death of a sibling in childhood increase risk of death in surviving children?
Bereavement in childhood due to the death of a sibling was associated with an increased risk for death in both the short and long term, according to a new article published by JAMA Pediatrics.
Anti-viral treatment during pregnancy reduces HBV transmission from mother to child
An analysis of published studies indicates that the antiviral drug tenofovir given to pregnant women in the second or third trimester can help prevent mother to child transmission of the hepatitis B virus (HBV).
New guideline published on uncommon risk of death in epilepsy
There is an uncommon risk of death that people with epilepsy and their loved ones may not know about.
Physicians vastly underestimate patients' willingness to share sexual orientation, study finds
A study that surveyed a national sample of emergency department health care providers and adult patients suggests that patients are substantially more willing to disclose their sexual orientation than health care workers believe.
Clarifying the mechanism for suppressing turbulence through ion mass
The National Institutes of Natural Sciences National Institute for Fusion Science, in collaborative research with Nagoya University, has clarified through theory and simulation research that turbulence in a plasma confined in the magnetic field is suppressed and the heat and particle losses are reduced in cases with larger ion mass.
Game-changing PanDDA method unveils previously hidden 3-D structure data
Scientists have utilised Diamond Light Source to develop a new method to extract previously hidden information from the X-ray diffraction data that are measured when resolving the three-dimensional (3-D) atomic structures of proteins and other biological molecules.
Was that climate change?
A new four-step 'framework' aims to test the contribution of climate change to record-setting extreme weather events.
UTA, UT Southwestern findings challenge current approach to Glut1 deficiency
Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center have discovered that diet changes and early diagnosis could help outcomes for patients with Glucose Transporter Type 1 Deficiency, a rare pediatric neurological disorder that can cause motor developmental problems and trigger seizures and epilepsy.
Next-generation microscopy
A novel microscopy method allows unprecedented insights into the spatial organization and direct interactions of immune cells within blood and liquid multi-lineage tissues.
From abundant hydrocarbons to rare spin liquids
Fuel such as petrol is made up of hydrocarbons -- a family of molecules consisting entirely of carbon and hydrogen.
Recommendation against inhaled flu vaccine is good -- for now
Recent federal recommendations against offering the inhaled nasal influenza vaccine due to lack of effectiveness could lead to more flu illness in the US if the inhaled vaccine becomes effective again or if not having the choice of the needle-less vaccine substantially reduces immunization rates, according to a new analysis led by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine scientists.

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