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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | April 28, 2017


Study examines state of social, personality psychology research
University of Illinois at Chicago researchers conducted two studies to examine the state and quality of social and personality research and how practices have changed, if at all.
Fast, low energy, and continuous biofuel extraction from microalgae
Researchers from Kumamoto University in Japan used a nanosecond pulsed electric field to extract hydrocarbons from microalgae.
Astrophysicists discovered a star polluted by calcium
An international team of astrophysicists led by a scientist from the Sternberg Astronomical Institute of the Lomonosov Moscow State University reported the discovery of a binary solar-type star inside the supernova remnant RCW 86.
Study: Bonobos may be better representation of last common ancestor with humans
A new study examining the muscular system of bonobos provides firsthand evidence that the rare great ape species may be more closely linked, anatomically, to human ancestors than common chimpanzees.
Helpful tool allows physicians to more accurately predict parathyroid cancer recurrence
A newly-created prognostic tool reliably predicts the recurrence of parathyroid cancer, enabling physicians to identify patients at the highest risk.
Researchers develop online support for people with bipolar disorder
An online relapse prevention tool for bipolar disorder offers a 'cheap accessible option' for people seeking support following treatment, say researchers.
Variations in tuition at public universities have grown, masking the cost of attendance
Differences in undergraduate tuition rates by a student's degree program or year of study have become increasingly prevalent over the past 25 years, finds a study by New York University's Steinhardt School, Arizona State University, and the University of Louisville.
Counting the cuts in Mohs surgery: A way to improve care and reduce costs
In an analysis of Medicare billing data submitted by more than 2,300 United States physicians, researchers have calculated the average number of surgical slices, or cuts, made during Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS), a procedure that progressively removes thin layers of cancerous skin tissue in a way that minimizes damage to healthy skin and the risks of leaving cancerous tissue behind.
The world's fastest film camera: When light practically stands still
Forget high-speed cameras capturing 100,000 images per second. A research group at Lund University in Sweden has developed a camera that can film at a rate equivalent to five trillion images per second, or events as short as 0.2 trillionths of a second.
Success in the 3-D bioprinting of cartilage
A team of researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy has managed to generate cartilage tissue by printing stem cells using a 3-D-bioprinter.
Key priorities for agricultural microbiomes identified
A coordinated effort to understand plant microbiomes could boost plant health and agricultural productivity, according to a perspective piece in the open access journal PLOS Biology.
Further knowledge required about the differences between milk proteins
Recent years have witnessed significant debates on proteins in milk, in particular the differences between A1 and A2 proteins.
Bullying linked to increased desire for cosmetic surgery in teens
Adolescents who are involved in bullying--victims and perpetrators alike -- are more likely to say they would want to undergo cosmetic surgery to be more attractive or fix perceived flaws, reports a study in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
Study analyzes health care quality, IT, reimbursements
Management of health care quality and costs has become a prominent topic of debate and research in the last decade in the United States.
Bacteria with Midas touch for efficient gold processing
Special 'nugget-producing' bacteria may hold the key to more efficient processing of gold ore, mine tailings and recycled electronics, as well as aid in exploration for new deposits, University of Adelaide research has shown.
Zika virus persists in the central nervous system and lymph nodes of rhesus monkeys
Zika virus can persist in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), lymph nodes and colorectal tissue of infected rhesus monkeys for weeks after the virus has been cleared from blood, urine and mucosal secretions, according to a study published online in Cell.
Overdose prevention and naloxone rescue among family members of people who use opioids
Family members are often the ones who administer naloxone during an opioid overdose and should be considered as part of the larger response to help curb fatal overdoses.
New organic lasers one step closer to reality
Researchers at Kyushu University's Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research have developed an optically pumped organic thin-film laser that can continuously emit light for 30 ms, which is more than 100 times longer than previous devices.
Testosterone makes men less likely to question their impulses
A new study shows that testosterone makes men less likely to realize when they're wrong.
NASA eyes intensifying Tropical Cyclone Frances
Two NASA satellites provided forecasters in Australia with visible and rainfall data as Tropical Cyclone Frances strengthened in the western Timor Sea.
Plague bacteria take refuge in amoebae
Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes bubonic plague, can survive within the ubiquitous soil protozoan, the amoeba, by producing proteins that protect against the latter microbe's digestion.
Hybrid heterostructures with programmable potentials
In a novel controllable chemical method, Flagship researchers have created hybrid nanomaterials that can be tailored to have programmable electronic and optical properties -- ideal for designing new types of electronics with new functionalities.
Study finds primary school children get less active with age
There is an age-related decline in children's physical activity levels as they progress through primary school, according to a British Heart Foundation-funded study.
Artificial pancreas benefits young children, trial shows
A pilot study among young children with Type 1 diabetes found that a University of Virginia-developed artificial pancreas helped study participants better control their condition.
Unlikely pair of plants named after stars of movie 'Twins'
Biologists from The Australian National University have named an unlikely pair of plants after Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito, the stars of the 1988 movie 'Twins.'
Dawn of organic single crystal electronics
Researchers at the Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences (Japan) have developed a method for high performance doping of organic single crystal.
Unraveling the mystery of DNA attacks in cells' powerhouse could pave way for new cancer treatments
New research has unraveled the mystery of how mitochondria -- the energy generators within cells -- can withstand attacks on their DNA from rogue molecules.
A material inspired by a sea worm changes according to the environment
The gelatinous jaw of a sea worm, which becomes hard or flexible depending on the environment around it, has inspired researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to develop a new material that can be applied to soft robotics.
Discovery of a facile process for H2 production using ammonia as a carrier
Researchers at Oita University, Japan, have created a new process for producing H2 from ammonia with rapid initiation that requires no external heat source, giving hope for the increased global use of H2 as an efficient and clean energy source.
Antibiotics counteract the beneficial effect of whole grain
Antibiotics may impede the health properties of whole grain, especially for women.
Researchers track impact of Brazil's 'Soy Moratorium' on an advancing agricultural frontier
The research appearing in PLOS ONE suggests the 2006 Soy Moratorium had a larger effect in reducing deforestation in the Amazon than has been previously understood.
Harvard & UT researchers propose systems connection in acupuncture & 21st century medicine
Harvard University's renown fascia researcher Helene Langevin, MD, and co-author Rosa Schnyer, PhD, LAc propose that elements of classical acupuncture 'are related to important 21st century advances in physiology and medicine, including systems biology, cross-system integration, matrix biology and mechanotherapeutics.'
A new study revises the development and evolutionary origin of the vertebrate brain
Researchers have made the first detailed map of the regions into which the brain of one of the most closely-related organisms to the vertebrates is divided and which could give us an idea of what our ancestor was like.
Symbiotic bacteria: From hitchhiker to beetle bodyguard
An international team of researchers have discovered a remarkable microbe with a Jekyll and Hyde character.
PowerPoint & LED projector enable new technique for self-folding origami
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Peking University have found a new use for the ubiquitous PowerPoint slide: Producing self-folding three-dimensional origami structures from photocurable liquid polymers.
Expert unravels disease that took the hearing of world-famous painter
Francisco Goya is the most important Spanish artist of the late 18th and early 19th century.
Hubble's bright shining lizard star
The bright object seen in this Hubble image is a single and little-studied star named TYC 3203-450-1, located in the constellation of Lacerta (The Lizard).
Scientists set record resolution for drawing at the one-nanometer length scale
Using a specialized electron microscope outfitted with a pattern generator, scientists turned an imaging instrument into a lithography tool that could be used to create and study materials with new properties.
Rising costs & potential savings for generic, topical steroids
In a new study led by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital, researchers have found that although most topical steroids prescribed to patients were generic, there was a sharp increase in Medicare Part D and out-of-pocket spending for elderly patients taking these drugs.
Single gene encourages growth of intestinal stem cells, supporting 'niche' cells -- and cancer
A gene previously identified as critical for tumor growth in many human cancers also maintains intestinal stem cells and encourages the growth of cells that support them, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers.
Thin layers of water hold promise for the energy storage of the future
Researchers have found that a material which incorporates atomically thin layers of water is able to store and deliver energy much more quickly than the same material that doesn't include the water layers.
First endoscopic stricturotomy with needle knife study for intestinal strictures in IBD
Cleveland Clinic doctors have published the first study illustrating the safety and efficacy of endoscopic needle-knife therapy for intestinal strictures in patients with inflammatory bowel disorder.
The high cost of surviving acute respiratory distress syndrome
According to a new multicenter study, nearly half of previously employed adult survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome were jobless one year after hospital discharge, and are estimated to have lost an average of $27,000 in earnings.
When bridges collapse: Stanford researchers study whether we're underestimating risk
Studying how and why bridges have collapsed in the past identifies the limitation of current risk assessment approach and demonstrates the value of new perspectives on climate change impact.
Why is herpes simplex virus disease risk so much greater for newborns?
Interferon is a crucial component of the human immune system's response to infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), but how important a role it plays in determining the severity of disease and explaining why newborns are so much more susceptible to HSV-1 infection than adults remains unclear.
Towards largest-possible separation between quantum and classical query complexities
Within the black-box model, just how large a quantum speedup is possible?
When the smoke clears... tobacco control in post-conflict settings
In new research published today by King's College London - Institute of Cancer Policy and the Conflict & Health Research Group in the journal ecancermedicalscience, the difficulties of prioritizing preventable disease and long term health issues in post conflict zones are explored.
Two papers challenge exclusion of acupuncture in government guidelines
Even as news in the United States recently highlighted the growing inclusion of acupuncture and other complementary and integrative medicine therapies in guidelines for multiple pain conditions, the exclusion of acupuncture in two British governmental guidelines is challenged in a paper and a commentary.
For plastic surgeons, learning 'danger zones' can increase safety when using facial fillers
Dermal fillers have become a popular alternative to surgery for patients who want a younger facial appearance.
Why chemists marched for science (video)
Tens of thousands of people gathered in Washington, D.C., and at hundreds of satellite marches around the world on Saturday to join the first March for Science.
How do babies coordinate gestures and vocalization?
Asier Romero-Andonegi, Aintzane Etxebarria-Lejarreta, Ainara Romero-Andonegi and Irati de Pablo-Delgado, lecturers and researchers at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Education in Bilbao, have studied how 9 to 13-month-old babies tackle the shift from early babbling to the use of combinations of gestures and speech.
Modern metabolic science yields better way to calculate indoor CO2
The air we breathe out can help us improve the quality of the air we breathe in.
Hybrid circuits can increase computational power of chaos-based systems
New research from North Carolina State University has found that combining digital and analog components in nonlinear, chaos-based integrated circuits can improve their computational power by enabling processing of a larger number of inputs.
New appetite control mechanism found in brain
A newly discovered molecule increases appetite during fasting -- and decreases it during gorging.
Long-term fate of tropical forests may not be as dire as believed, says CU Boulder study
Conventional wisdom has held that tropical forest growth will dramatically slow with high levels of rainfall.
The swollen colon -- cause of chronic inflammation discovered
Researchers at the University Medical Center of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and the German Research Center for Environmental Health, Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen have discovered that too much of the oncogene Bcl-3 leads to chronic intestinal diseases.
Ultracold atom waves may shed light on rogue ocean killers
By precisely controlling the quantum behavior of an ultracold atomic gas, Rice University physicists have created a model system for studying the wave phenomenon that may bring about rogue waves in Earth's oceans.
Medical guidelines for astronauts to be launched in the US
Scientists at the University of Plymouth and Northumbria University, Newcastle, UK, are helping to write the medical rulebook that will keep astronauts fit and healthy during long trips through the solar system.

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