Nav: Home

Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | May 05, 2017


Vitamin A deficiency is detrimental to blood stem cells
Lack of vitamin A in the body has a detrimental effect on the hematopoietic system in the bone marrow.
Scientists find genetic mutation responsible for rare skin disease in Afrikaners
Researchers at the Sydney Brenner Institute for Molecular Bioscience and the Division of Human Genetics at Wits, in collaboration with peers in Europe, the US and Canada published this research in the May issue of the American Journal of Human Genetics.
CCNY physicists demonstrate photonic hypercrystals for control of light-matter interaction
Control of light-matter interaction is central to fundamental phenomena and technologies such as photosynthesis, lasers, LEDs and solar cells.
New research shows growth of East Antarctic Ice Sheet was less than previously suggested
Scientists have known for over a decade that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has been losing mass and contributing to sea level rise.
Researchers shed new light on influenza detection
Notre Dame Researchers have discovered a way to make influenza visible to the naked eye, by engineering dye molecules to target a specific enzyme of the virus.
Benefits of antipsychotics outweigh risks, find experts
An international group of experts has concluded that, for patients with schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, antipsychotic medications do not have negative long-term effects on patients' outcomes or the brain.
Extinction of Alpine plants may remain undetectable for a long time
How do alpine plants react to warmer climatic conditions? Due to their longevity, the plants may survive longer than expected in their habitats, but produce offspring that are increasingly maladapted.
Red light, green light invention prevents work interruptions
A UBC computer scientist has invented a unique desk light that automatically switches from green to red when you are 'in the zone' and shouldn't be disturbed by colleagues.
Pregnancy linked to higher risk of death from traumatic injury, Penn study finds
Studies have found that one in six pregnant women have been abused by a partner -- beaten, stabbed, shot, or even murdered.
Head & neck cancer recurrence following radiation associated with high tumor PD-L1 expression
Recurrence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) negative for human papillomavirus (HPV) following radiation therapy was associated with high tumor levels of the protein PD-L1.
Study shows association between gut microbes and brain structure in people with IBS
Research shows for the first time an association between the gut microbiota and the brain regions involved in the processing of sensory information from their bodies.
Poultry feed with arsenic more problematic than assumed?
Supplements containing arsenic have been banned in the European Union since 1999 and in North America since 2013.
First molecular diagnostics for insecticide resistance in sandflies
A study led by LSTM identifies a potent molecular mechanism for insecticide resistance in the world's most medically-important sandfly species and develops DNA-diagnostics for monitoring future impact on visceral leishmaniasis control and elimination programs.
New defence mechanism against bacteria discovered
Researchers in dermatology at Lund University in Sweden believe they have cracked the mystery of why we are able to quickly prevent an infection from spreading uncontrollably in the body during wounding.
Scientists gain insights into how Fragile X syndrome disrupts perception
A collaboration between scientists in Belgium, the United States, Norway, France and the UK has resulted in a study that sheds light on the neural mechanisms of Fragile X syndrome.
Platelets suppress T cell immunity against cancer
In the May 5, 2017, issue of Science Immunology, cancer researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina report that blood platelets blunt the immune response to cancer.
Immune cells derived from specialised progenitors
Dendritic cells are gatekeepers of Immunity. Up to now dendritic cell subtypes were thought to develop from one common progenitor.
Researchers discover how flu viruses hijack human cells
Much is known about flu viruses, but little is understood about how they reproduce inside human host cells, spreading infection.
Differences in levels of trust and power can affect buyer-supplier performance
Mutual trust does not appear on the ledger sheets of buyers and suppliers, but researchers suggest that levels of trust between companies may be an important influence on how they operate and perform.
Discovery of new transparent thin film material could improve electronics and solar cells
A team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, have discovered a new nano-scale thin film material with the highest-ever conductivity in its class.
UT Health San Antonio team cures diabetes in mice without side effects
A discovery made at The University of Texas Health Science Center, now called UT Health San Antonio, increases the types of pancreatic cells that secrete insulin.
New butterfly species discovered in Israel for the first time in 109 years
Little does a scientist expect to discover a new species of easy-to-see and well-studied animal, especially if it inhabits thoroughly explored areas.
MRSA blood infections are less fatal in kids, but cause significant complications
Children with bloodstream infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a common antibiotic-resistant bacteria, are less likely to die than adults with this condition and have different risk factors for treatment failure, a new study led by a Children's National Health System clinician indicates.
Scientists reveal new and improved genome sequence of Daphnia pulex
By understanding how they respond to toxic elements, scientists can look at how environmental changes caused by agriculture and road runoff or warming temperatures and climate change could impact populations in lakes, rivers and standing bodies of water.
How photosynthetic cells deal with a lack of iron
University of Freiburg researchers discover a small RNA molecule in cyanobacteria that affects metabolic acclimation.
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Donna blanket Vanuatu
The 80 plus islands that make up the nation of Vanuatu were blanketed by the clouds of Tropical Cyclone Donna when NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
Researchers discover a potential new target for cancer treatment
Inhibition of the enzyme RIOK1could stop the growth of tumors and the development of metastases
Analysis examines mortality risks after different types of kidney surgery
A new study provides insights into the true risks of all types of nephrectomy, or surgical removal of the kidney.
A mutation giving leaves with white spots has been identified
Garden and potted plants with white spots on their leaves are so popular that they are specially selected for this feature.
Researchers identify gene that controls birth defect common in diabetes
Researchers have identified a gene that plays a key role in the formation of neural tube defects, a problem commonly found in infants of pregnant women with diabetes.
You need more than just a white hat to tell the hero from the villain
The Sopranos' Tony Soprano and Walter White from Breaking Bad rank among recent television drama's most notorious protagonists, each of questionable morality.
Scientists track porpoises to assess impact of offshore wind farms
A new study is the first in a series to understand how marine mammals like porpoises, whales, and dolphins may be impacted by the construction of wind farms off the coast of Maryland.
Regions with stronger gun laws have fewer gun-related pediatric emergency department visits
Regions of the United States with the strictest gun laws also have the fewest emergency department visits for pediatric firearm-related injuries, according to a new study by Children's National Health System researchers.
Shape-changing fog screen invented
There is something spooky about being able to see and talk to the pirate Blackbeard while one walks down a dark alley and then stepping right through him as he disappears into thin air.
Stretching may reduce walking pain among peripheral artery disease patients
Wearing a splint to stretch calf muscles may enhance blood flow through clogged leg arteries.
Antarctic study shows central ice sheet is stable since milder times
Central parts of Antarctica's ice sheet have been stable for millions of years, from a time when conditions were considerably warmer than now, research suggests.
Study shows white blood cell boosting drugs safe during chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancer
A late breaking subanalysis of the phase III CONVERT trial presented at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC) shows that white blood cell boosting drugs are safe during concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of small cell lung cancer (SCLC).
Adaptive radiotherapy reduces pneumonitis while controlling lung cancer
Researchers have found that it is possible to adapt radiation treatment for lung cancer so that it targets the tumor much more precisely, resulting in a significant decrease in radiation-induced pneumonitis -- a potentially fatal inflammation of the lung tissue.
New theory on how Earth's crust was created
Conventional theory holds that all of the early Earth's crustal ingredients were formed by volcanic activity.
Group rituals can make us biased against outsiders
From our greetings to our celebrations to how we take our coffee, everyday life is full of shared rituals.
Macular evaluation with spectral domain type optic coherence tomography
Acute nonarteritic anterior ischemic opticneuropathy (NAION) is the most common optic neuropathy observed in the elderly population.
Obese women less likely to suffer from dangerous preeclampsia complications
Despite having higher rates of preeclampsia, a dangerous high-blood pressure disorder of late pregnancy, obese women may be less than half as likely to suffer strokes, seizures, and other serious complications of the disorder.
Internet of things sensors could connect via ambient radio waves
Internet of things (IoT) systems usually link networks of sensors via radio, but radios demand battery power thus limiting usability.
Retirement associated with lower stress, but only if you were in a top job
A new paper published in the Journal of Gerontology suggests that the period around retirement may widen socio-economic inequalities in stress and health.

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Erasing The Stigma
Many of us either cope with mental illness or know someone who does. But we still have a hard time talking about it. This hour, TED speakers explore ways to push past — and even erase — the stigma. Guests include musician and comedian Jordan Raskopoulos, neuroscientist and psychiatrist Thomas Insel, psychiatrist Dixon Chibanda, anxiety and depression researcher Olivia Remes, and entrepreneur Sangu Delle.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#537 Science Journalism, Hold the Hype
Everyone's seen a piece of science getting over-exaggerated in the media. Most people would be quick to blame journalists and big media for getting in wrong. In many cases, you'd be right. But there's other sources of hype in science journalism. and one of them can be found in the humble, and little-known press release. We're talking with Chris Chambers about doing science about science journalism, and where the hype creeps in. Related links: The association between exaggeration in health related science news and academic press releases: retrospective observational study Claims of causality in health news: a randomised trial This...