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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | May 19, 2017


New approach to revolutionize the production of molecular hydrogen
A paper from cfaed's Chair for Molecular Functional Materials co-authored by researchers at universities and institutes in Germany, France and Japan has been published in Nature Communications on May 17, 2017.
Study reveals meeting guidelines on TV time, physical activity and sleep duration lower BMI and body fat in children
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal May 17-20 shows that achieving the guideline amounts of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity is associated with significantly lower BMI and body fat in children.
Rutgers researchers develop protocol to analyze many cells at once
With the new FISH-Flow protocol, researchers are able to evaluate multitudes of cells at once for telltale mRNA species and proteins.
Nutritional properties of mushrooms are better when grilled or microwaved
Culinary treatments (boiling, microwaving, grilling, and deep frying) influence on proximate composition and antioxidant capacity of most cultivated mushrooms worldwide.
SAEM 2017: Best practices in EMS oversight needed to improve pre-hospital care
A 2015 Institute of Medicine report that highlighted fragmentation among EMS systems in the United States compelled Michigan Medicine researchers to evaluate the quality of EMS oversight in Michigan and explore how EMS systems could work together to improve patient care.
Understanding the architecture of our 'second brain'
Scientists have made an important step in understanding the organisation of nerve cells embedded within the gut that control its function -- a discovery that could give insight into the origin of common gastrointestinal diseases, including irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation.
New study opens case on emotional stress of senior police investigators in child homicide
Child homicide can shatter families and communities. But what emotional effect does it have on detectives who might have to investigate such crimes repeatedly during their careers?
New biomarkers of multiple sclerosis pathogenesis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic debilitating inflammatory disease targeting the brain.
Tau prevents synaptic transmission at early stage of neurodegeneration
Tau proteins are involved in more than twenty neurodegenerative diseases, including various forms of dementia.
Sequestering blue carbon through better management of coastal ecosystems
Focusing on the management of carbon stores within vegetated coastal habitats provides an opportunity to mitigate some aspects of global warming.
Urine test finds what makes people say no to blood pressure lowering pills
University of Manchester researchers together with their UK and overseas collaborators have found out that more than one-third of 1,400 people with high blood pressure have not been taking their blood pressure medication.
Study shows that a high protein intake in early childhood is associated with higher body fat mass but not higher lean mass
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal, May 17-20, shows that a high intake of protein in early childhood, particularly from animal food sources, is associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) due to increased body fat and not increases in fat-free mass.
Can omega-3 help prevent Alzheimer's disease? Brain SPECT imaging shows possible link
The incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is expected to triple in the coming decades and no cure has been found.
Stressing the brain through technology may reduce age-related disease
In this Opinion paper the researchers discuss how a meaningful and intentional integration with technology, which hormetically challenges our cognition, may redress the conflict for resources between the soma and the germline, and result in a reduction of age-related dysfunction in participating humans.
Flies the key to studying the causes of dementia
A research team from the University of Plymouth, University of Southampton and the Alexander Fleming Biomedical Sciences Research Center, Vari, Greece, have studied two structurally-similar proteins in the adult brain and have found that they play distinct roles in the development of dementia.
Erectile dysfunction medicines do not cause melanoma, analysis of large studies finds
Use of the erectile dysfunction drug Viagra does not cause the development of melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer.
New hope for slow-healing wounds
MicroRNAs are interesting target structures for new therapeutic agents. They can be blocked through synthetic antimiRs.
University of Surrey wins award to help revolutionize paper technology
The University of Surrey's Professor David Frohlich has won £1.17m funding from the Digital Economy program, to research and develop paper materials that would allow readers to 'interact' with printed materials like Harry Potter portraits.
Iron deficiency restrains marine microbes
Iron is a critical nutrient in the ocean. Its importance for algae and the nitrogen cycle has already been investigated in detail.
Predicting influenza outbreaks faster with a digitally-empowered wearable device
Through integration with a wearable thermometer, the Thermia online health educational tool developed at Boston Children's Hospital has enabled prediction of seasonal influenza outbreaks in China one month earlier than before, according to a new study in the American Journal of Public Health.
New survey delves into impact of intergenerational wealth on retirement
People with an inheritance are more than twice as likely as those without one to feel prepared for retirement (38 percent vs.
Experts explain origins of topographic relief on Earth, Mars and Titan
The surfaces of Earth, Mars, and Titan, Saturn's largest moon, have all been scoured by rivers.
Nursing homes cut urinary tract infections in half through focused effort on catheter care
A new study shows a way to keep urinary catheters from posing as much of a risk to the 1.4 million Americans currently in long-term and post-acute care.
Nearly one-quarter of patients say mechanical heart valve disturbs sleep
Nearly one-quarter of patients with a mechanical heart valve say it disturbs their sleep, according to research presented today at EuroHeartCare 2017.
Mosquitoes that spread Zika virus could simultaneously transmit other viruses
A new study led by Colorado State University found that Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito that carries Zika virus, might also transmit chikungunya and dengue viruses with one bite.
Parental BMI, low income and smoking found to have strong effects on child BMI and overweight, independent of birthweight and infancy BMI
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (May 17-20) shows that parental body mass index (BMI), low income and smoking have persisting, strong and direct effects on a child's future BMI and risk of overweight, independent of that child's birthweight and BMI in infancy.
Scientists enlist engineered protein to battle the MERS virus
Researchers converted a staple human ubiquitin protein into an anti-viral tool.
Hypertension in young adults shows long-term heart risks
Otherwise healthy young people with high systolic blood pressure over 140 are at greater risk for future artery stiffening linked to an increased risk of stroke as well as possible damage to the kidneys and brain, new research shows.
Educational session helps alleviate distress in prostate cancer patients & their partners
In a recent study, an educational session helped alleviate distress equally in both patients with prostate cancer and their partners.
Sea level as a metronome of Earth's history
Sedimentary layers contain stratigraphic cycles and patterns that precisely reveal the succession of climatic and tectonic conditions that have occurred over millennia.
Herpetologists describe an elf frog from the elfin forests in southern Vietnam
Going under the common name of Elfin mountain toad, a new amphibian is recognized as one of the smallest representative of its group.
Scientists identify two new proteins connected to plant development
The discovery of two new proteins could lead to better ways to regulate plant structure and the ability to resist crop stresses such as drought, thus improving agriculture productivity.
To curb medical errors, physicians must be better trained to admit mistakes
The medical community has made strides to normalize and encourage error disclosure for physicians and medical trainees in order to improve patient safety and health care outcomes, but these guidelines fall short when it comes to addressing the social psychology that influences how and when physicians and medical trainees disclose errors and how they manage the consequences of those errors.
Hay fever map of Britain published to help sufferers avoid hotspots
A hay fever map of Britain -- with the first ever guide to the location of plants in the UK that can trigger the allergy -- has been produced to help sufferers cope, and warn them which 'hotspots' to avoid.
Researchers look to add statistical safeguards to data analysis and visualization software
Brown University computer scientists have shown a new way to help prevent users of data exploration software from making false discoveries.
Light exposure in the evening improves performance in the final spurt
Athletes often have to compete late in the evening, when they are no longer able to perform at their best.
Results with new bioresorbable stent (BRS) technologies reported at EuroPCR 2017
Paris, France: Promising results were reported in late-breaking trials with novel bioresorbable stent technologies at EuroPCR 2017, paving the way for ongoing developments in stents that are dissolved or reabsorbed after achieving vessel expansion in percutaneous coronary intervention procedures.
Canadian cardiologist publishes world first mitral regurgitation procedure
A Canadian cardiologist has published a report describing how he used a Canadian-invented device for the first time in the world to successfully insert a MitraClip through a patient's jugular vein.
Social media help identify medication concerns of inflammatory bowel disease patients
Cedars-Sinai researchers analyzed thousands of social media posts to determine the biggest concerns patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have about their prescribed treatments.
How cancer cells flood the lung
Lung cancer patients are particularly susceptible to malignant pleural effusion, when fluid collects in the space between the lungs and the chest wall.
Disrupted fat breakdown in the brain makes mice dumb
A study led by the University of Bonn opens a new perspective with regard to the development of dementia.
Antibody for fighting cancer emerges
While studying the underpinnings of multiple sclerosis, investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital came across important clues for how to treat a very different disease: cancer.
Insects resist genetic methods to control disease spread, Indiana University study finds
A study from Indiana University published May 19 in the journal Science Advances finds that insects possess a naturally occurring resistance to the use of gene-editing technology to prevent diseases such as malaria.
Overweight boys at greater risk of colon cancer as adults, but losing weight may modify risk
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal (May 17-20) suggests that overweight boys may be at greater risk of colon (bowel) cancer when they grow up than their slimmer friends.
Plasmon-powered upconversion nanocrystals for enhanced bioimaging and polarized emission
Rare-earth-doped nanocrystals have become sought-after materials for cellular bioprobes because of their long emission lifetimes and low cytotoxicity.
Blood discovery could benefit preemies, help end platelet shortages
A new discovery may be the key to stopping shortages of vital blood-clotting cells that can represent the difference between life and death.
Chronic pain amplifies the brain's reaction to new injuries
Chronic pain in any one body part may distort the intensity with which a key brain region perceives pain everywhere else.
Physicists discover that lithium oxide on tokamak walls can improve plasma performance
A team of physicists has discovered that a coating of lithium oxide on the inside of fusion machines known as tokamaks absorbs as much deuterium as pure lithium does.
'Adopted' embryo program produces new style extended families
Experts at the University of Huddersfield are researching the emergence of a new style of family creation that sees couples 'adopt' embryos and, after the child is born, remain in contact with the donors and in many cases develop a special relationship with them.
Epigenetic program leading to vessel differentiation
Clarification of how human blood vessels are constructed is desperately needed to advance regenerative medicine.
One in 5 cancers diagnosed in the United States is a rare cancer
About one in five cancer diagnoses in the United States is a rare cancer, according to a new American Cancer Society report.
ESF lists Top 10 new species for 2017
A spider and an ant with names drawn from popular books, a pink katydid and an omnivorous rat made the College of Environmental Science and Forestry's list of the Top 10 New Species for 2017.
Triple play boosting value of renewable fuel could tip market in favor of biomass
A new process triples the fraction of biomass converted to high-value products to nearly 80 percent, also tripling the expected rate of return for an investment in the technology from roughly 10 percent (for one end product) to 30 percent.
Shapeshifting materials: Using light to rearrange macroscopic structures
OIST researchers create self-assembling molecules which can be broken down by ultraviolet light to recombine into novel macroscopic shapes.
Fueling the future
The Royal Society of Chemistry journal Energy & Environmental Science recently published research by a team from the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Oklahoma investigating the full life cycle impact of one promising 'second-generation biofuel' produced from short-rotation oak.
Mislocalized calcium channel causes insulin secretion defect in diabetes
Researchers from Uppsala University have studied beta cells of type-2 diabetic donors, and find that a mislocalized calcium channel contributes to the failed insulin secretion associated with the disease.
Scientists investigate how the sense of smell works in bacteria
Biophysicists have proposed a universal mechanism for the 'sense of smell' in bacteria.
How RNA formed at the origins of life
A single process for how a group of molecules called nucleotides were made on the early Earth, before life began, has been suggested by a UCL-led team of researchers.
Alzheimer's disease-associated Aβ42 peptide
In this paper, the researchers report on a straightforward expression and purification protocol to obtain [U-15N] and [U-2H,13C,15N] Aβ42.
Caution urged in using PRP or stem cells to treat young athletes' injuries
Physicians, parents and coaches should be cautious when considering treating injured young athletes with platelet rich plasma (PRP), stem cells or other types of regenerative medicine, says a nationally recognized sports medicine clinician and researcher at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and UHealth Sports Medicine Institute.
Self-ventilating workout suit keeps athletes cool and dry
A team of MIT researchers has designed a breathable workout suit with ventilating flaps that open and close in response to an athlete's body heat and sweat.
Study finds need for educating older adults on outdoor fall prevention
Many older adults have fallen outdoors but lack an understanding of the risks for falling and how to prevent them, warranting efforts for outdoor fall prevention, finds a new study by New York University researchers.

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