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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 21, 2017


Combination of features produces new Android vulnerability
A new vulnerability affecting Android mobile devices results not from a traditional bug, but from the malicious combination of two legitimate permissions that power desirable and commonly used features in popular apps.
Prompt sepsis treatment less likely when ERs overcrowded
According to a new study, patients with sepsis, a life-threatening complication of an infection, had delays approaching one hour in being given antibiotics when seen in emergency rooms that were overcrowded.
Supercomputer study unlocks secrets of brain and safer anesthetics
Modelling of how protein 'switches' are activated, leading to electrical signals in the brain, paves the way for understanding how brain activity can be controlled by existing and new drugs, including anesthetics.
Angiotensin II shows promise in helping critically ill patients with low blood pressure
Sixty years after Cleveland Clinic researchers first isolated the role of angiotensin II in controlling blood pressure, a new international study led by Cleveland Clinic researchers shows that the compound can safely improve blood pressure among critically ill patients who are experiencing life-threatening hypotension, or low blood pressure.
Accuracy of physician and nurse predictions for survival, functional outcomes after an ICU admission
Physicians were more accurate in predicting the likelihood of death and less accurate in predicting cognitive abilities in six months for critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients; nurses' predictions were similar or less accurate, according to a study published by JAMA.
New hope for patients with severe lung disease
Patients suffering from severe lung disease could see their lives transformed thanks to a 'game-changing' clinical trial carried out by UK experts and led by the team from the Lane Fox Respiratory Service based at Guy's and St Thomas' in London.
Mortality from acute respiratory distress syndrome found to be lower in high-volume ICUs
In a new study that analyzed data from the large French CUB-REA database, high volume intensive care units (ICUs) were found to have lower death rates from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) than low and moderate volume ICUs.
Addition of in-home noninvasive ventilation to oxygen therapy improves outcomes following COPD exacerbation
Among patients with an excess of carbon dioxide in their blood (persistent hypercapnia) following a flare-up (acute exacerbation) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), in-home use of a mask and machine to support breathing in addition to home oxygen therapy prolonged the time to hospital readmission or death, according to a study published by JAMA.
Faster is better when it comes to sepsis care
An analysis covering nearly 50,000 patients from 149 New York hospitals is the first to offer scientific evidence that a controversial early sepsis care regulation worked.
New study describes standardized assessment for students graduating from UK medical schools
A new study describes a standardized assessment that ensures that students who graduate from UK medical schools have achieved a minimum standard of knowledge and skill related to prescribing medications.
Penn study pinpoints accuracy of ICU doctors' and nurses' predictions of patient outcomes
A new study shows that ICU physicians are better at predicting whether patients will be alive in six months than they are at predicting patients' cognitive function in six months.
Parasitic robot system for waypoint navigation of turtle
This paper presents a 'parasitic robot system' whereby locomotion abilities of an animal are applied to a robot task.
Network traffic provides early indication of malware infection
By analyzing network traffic going to suspicious domains, security administrators could detect malware infections weeks or even months before they're able to capture a sample of the invading malware, a new study suggests.
COPD exacerbations in those with CVD may increase heart attack/stroke risk
After an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, people with a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD) or people at risk for CVD appear more likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke, according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.
Antibiotic therapy for nearly 1 in 4 adults with pneumonia does not work
Approximately one in four (22.1 percent) adults prescribed an antibiotic in an outpatient setting (such as a doctor's office) for community-acquired pneumonia does not respond to treatment, according to a new study presented at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference.
Two biomarkers appear to predict course of IPF
Two T cell biomarkers appear to predict the survival trajectory of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a lung disease that has a varied, but ultimately devastating, impact on patients, according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.
Directly observed therapy for multidrug-resistant TB decreases mortality
Directly observed therapy (DOT) for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) was associated with a 77 percent decrease in mortality in the United States, compared to self-administered therapy from 1993 to 2013, according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.
Improving health care for mother and child, doing fewer cesareans and ... saving money!
A training program to improve obstetrical management reduced the number of medically unjustified cesareans and generated significant savings for the healthcare system in Quebec, in addition to improving the quality of healthcare provided to mothers and babies.
Air pollution may disrupt sleep
High levels of air pollution over time may get in the way of a good night's sleep, according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.

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