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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | May 22, 2017


Intensive blood pressure can reduce risk of harm to heart muscle
A new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has shown that aggressive lowering of blood pressure in people with hypertension reduced the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH).
Study finds that sleep disorders affect men and women differently
A new study suggests that men and women are affected differently by sleep disorders.
Why fewer blood cancer patients receive hospice care
Research has shown that patients with blood cancers are less likely to enroll in hospice care than patients with solid cancers, and the findings from a national survey suggest that concerns about the adequacy of hospice may prevent blood cancer specialists from referring their patients.
DNA vaccine protects against toxic proteins linked to Alzheimer's
A new DNA vaccine when delivered to the skin prompts an immune response that produces antibodies to protect against toxic proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease -- without triggering severe brain swelling that earlier antibody treatments caused in some patients.
Humanizing, harmonizing effects of music aren't a myth
UA professor Jake Harwood and his collaborators have found that listening to music from other cultures furthers one's pro-diversity beliefs.
Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria
Laser-induced graphene made from an inexpensive polymer is an effective anti-fouling material and, when charged, an excellent antibacterial surface.
Moderate drinking may not ward off heart disease
Many people believe that having a glass of wine with dinner -- or moderately drinking any kind of alcohol -- will protect them from heart disease.
City life could present psychosis risk for adolescents
Living in a city could significantly increase young people's vulnerability to psychotic experiences, according to a new study from King's College London and Duke University.
Discovery of an alga's 'dictionary of genes' could lead to advances in biofuels, medicine
A team of plant biologists and biochemists has produced a gold mine of data by sequencing the genome of a tiny, single-celled green alga that could be used as a source of sustainable biofuel and has health implications.
3.3-million-year-old fossil reveals the antiquity of the human spine
An international research team has found a 3.3 million Australopithecus afarensis fossilized skeleton, possessing the most complete spinal column of any early fossil human relative.
SAEM 2017: EM physicians should stay current on studies to up their critical care game
Reviewing studies can be a tedious task, but one Michigan Medicine physician explains the importance of staying up to date on medical literature, even outside of one's primary field of medicine.
ASKAP telescope to rule radio-burst hunt
A CSIRO telescope in Western Australia has found its first 'fast radio burst' from space after less than four days of searching.
Study redefines HPV-related head and neck cancers
Much of what we thought we knew about the human papilloma virus (HPV) in HPV-related head and neck cancers may be wrong, according to a newly published study by Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) researchers that analyzed data from The Human Cancer Genome Atlas.
Effective intervention for binge drinking in adolescents
An intervention program based on school class groups has a preventive effect on subsequent drinking behavior, especially binge drinking, in adolescents who had previously consumed alcohol.
Intestinal fungi worsen alcoholic liver disease
Liver cirrhosis is the 12th leading cause of mortality worldwide and approximately half of those deaths are due to alcohol abuse.
Sleep apnea may increase risk of pregnancy complications
Women with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) appear to be at greater risk for serious pregnancy complications, longer hospital stays and even admission to the ICU than mothers without the condition, according to a new study of more than 1.5 million pregnancies presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.
Scientists develop test to identify best treatment for gonorrhea
Researchers from UCLA have developed a laboratory test that helps physicians determine which people with gonorrhea may be more treatable with an antibiotic that has not been recommended since 2007 because of concerns that the resistance to the drug was growing.
Success of stem cell therapy for diabetes depends on pre-transplant immune condition
Researchers at the Center for Cell-Based Therapy at University of São Paulo (USP) show that the therapeutic effect is relatively short-lived in patients with more autoreactive lymphocytes before treatment.
ATS 2017: New COPD action plan outlines strategies for improved care
A Michigan Medicine researcher is a part of the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute group that recently created a new COPD National Action Plan.
Kepler telescope spies details of TRAPPIST-1 system's outermost planet
A University of Washington-led international team of astronomers has used data gathered by the Kepler Space Telescope to observe and confirm details of the outermost of seven exoplanets or-biting the star TRAPPIST-1.
Injecting activator of a powerful tumor suppressor directly into the cancer increases tumor destruction, decreases toxicity
Directly injecting a tumor with an agent that activates a natural, powerful tumor suppressor enhances the drug's capacity to attack the tumor both locally and where it spreads, scientists report in the journal Cancer Research.
Viral ARIs in infants may lead to recurrent childhood wheezing
Viral acute respiratory infections (ARIs) may lead to oxidative stress in some infants, and play a major role in the development of recurrent wheezing in early childhood, according to a new study presented at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference.
First ever data on number of gender confirmation surgeries
For the first time, the world's largest plastic surgery organization is tracking national statistics on gender confirmation surgeries.
The secret to combating pancreatic cancer may lie in suppression of a common protein
Research indicates that in mice with a KRAS mutation, present in 90 percent of pancreatic cancer patients, expressing only half the amount of the glucose-regulated protein GRP78 is enough to halt the earliest stage of pancreatic cancer development, resulting in delayed tumor development and prolonged survival.
Rethinking role of viruses in coral reef ecosystems
Viruses are thought to frequently kill their host bacteria, especially at high microbial density.
Preterm birth linked to higher risk of heart failure
Babies born preterm run a higher risk of heart failure during childhood and adolescence than those born at full term, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report.
Sunflower genome sequence to provide roadmap for more resilient crops
University of Georgia researchers are part of an international team that has published the first sunflower genome sequence.
Tracheotomy: Risk for fatal complications
A tracheotomy can be associated with fatal complications for the patient.
New insight into life-threatening childhood brain cancer
The most common type of malignant childhood brain cancer has been identified as seven separate conditions each needing a different treatment, new research has revealed.
Johns Hopkins study shows one of the deadliest hospital-acquired infections is preventable
In a recent paper published online in the journal Critical Care Medicine, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute of Patient Safety and Quality led a study that demonstrated that health care providers can take steps to curb ventilator-associated events.
Interrogating proteins
Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new protein structure, and are using it to understand how protein structures are stabilized.
Reduced US air pollution will boost rainfall in Africa's Sahel, says study
Falling sulfur dioxide emissions in the United States are expected to substantially increase rainfall in Africa's semi-arid Sahel, while bringing slightly more rain to much of the US, according to a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.
Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections
By some estimates, more than 1 million people contract infections from medical devices in US hospitals each year, many of which are due to biofilms.
Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized
Researchers invented a Compton camera of 580g which visualizes gamma rays of arbitrary energies, and succeeded in achieving a high-resolution, multicolor 3-D molecular image of a live mouse administered with three different radioactive tracers in just two hours.
Sleep apnea and insomnia in African-Americans goes undiagnosed
African-Americans with sleep apnea and insomnia are rarely diagnosed with either problem, even when the severity of the two sleep disorders are likely to affect their health, according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.
Investigational biologic appears to reduce oral corticosteroid use in severe asthma
An investigational biologic may reduce the need for adults with severe asthma to take an oral corticosteroid to control their asthma, according to a randomized controlled trial presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.
South African team performs second successful penis transplant
A team from Stellenbosch University and the Tygerberg Academic Hospital has performed a second penis transplant, making it the first medical centre in the world to successfully perform this procedure twice.
Predictive models may help determine which patients benefit from ICDs
Two predictive models may help cardiologists decide which patients would most benefit from an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), suggests a new study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Abused caregivers have double chance of poor health
Nearly one in 20 middle-age women face a cumulative health impact from taking on care-giving roles after experiencing intimate partner violence according to research from the University of Queensland.
Graphene-based sensor could improve evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of asthma
Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists have created a graphene-based sensor that could lead to earlier detection of looming asthma attacks and improve the management of asthma and other respiratory diseases, preventing hospitalizations and deaths.
Speeding up quality control for biologics
MIT engineers have devised a way to analyze biologics as they are being produced, which could lead to faster and more efficient safety tests for such drugs.
New findings on formation and malformation of blood vessels
In diseases like cancer, diabetes, rheumatism and stroke, a disorder develops in the blood vessels that exacerbates the condition and obstructs treatment.
Doctors urge FDA to tighten regulations on 'filtered' cigarettes
While the overall rate of lung cancer continues to decline in the United States, one form of the disease often found in the outer areas of the lungs continues to climb -- and experts think they know why.
Canadian team finds new antibiotic resistance gene in Salmonella from broiler chickens
A team of investigators from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Guelph, Ontario, has discovered a gene that confers resistance to the important broad-spectrum antibiotic, fosfomycin.
Fat can neutralize listeria
Certain fatty acids are not just part of a healthy diet.
National study looks at tobacco advertising and susceptibility to use tobacco among youth
Among 12- to 17-year-olds who have never used tobacco products, nearly half were considered receptive to tobacco marketing if they were able to recall or liked at least one advertisement, report researchers at University of California San Diego Moores Cancer Center and Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center, in a new national study.
Temple study shows baby boxes & sleep education reduced bed-sharing in 1st week of infancy
Bed-sharing, the unsafe practice in which parents sleep in the same bed as their babies, is associated with sleep-related deaths in infants, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed.
NASA adds up record Australia rainfall
Over the week of May 15, extreme rainfall drenched northeastern Australia and NASA data provided a look at the record totals.
Total synthesis of flueggenine C via an accelerated intermolecular Rauhut-Currier reaction
The first total synthesis of dimeric securinega alkaloid (-)-flueggenine C was completed via an accelerated intermolecular Rauhut-Currier (RC) reaction.
Scientists propose synestia, a new type of planetary object
There's something new to look for in the heavens, and it's called a 'synestia,' according to planetary scientists Simon Lock at Harvard University and Sarah Stewart at UC Davis.
Modified experimental vaccine protects monkeys from deadly malaria
Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, modified an experimental malaria vaccine and showed that it completely protected four of eight monkeys that received it against challenge with the virulent Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite.
Let there be light
Graphene Flagship research demonstrates large scale, fully integrable arrays of single photon quantum dots in layered materials, which may lead to hybrid on-chip photonics devices for networks and sensing.
Scientists find new genetic roots for intelligence
An international research team led by Professor Danielle Posthuma from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands, has made a major advance in understanding the genetic underpinnings of intelligence.
Magnetic order in a two-dimensional molecular chessboard
Achieving magnetic order in low-dimensional systems consisting of only one or two dimensions has been a research goal for some time.
Human-induced deforestation is causing an increase in malaria cases
A new study of 67 less-developed, malaria-endemic nations led by Lehigh University sociologist Dr.
Was a statin beneficial for primary cardiovascular prevention in older adults?
Analysis of data from older adults who participated in a clinical trial showed no benefit of a statin for all-cause mortality or coronary heart disease events when a statin was started for primary prevention in older adults with hypertension and moderately high cholesterol, according to a new article published by JAMA Internal Medicine.
New heart disease risk genes point to flaws in blood vessel walls
Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death worldwide.
Rise in lung adenocarcinoma linked to 'light' cigarette use
A new study shows that so-called 'light' cigarettes have no health benefits to smokers and have likely contributed to the rise of a certain form of lung cancer that occurs deep in the lungs.
Taking a closer look at genetic switches in cancer
Caltech biochemists have uncovered details of a protein that controls blood cell production in an aggressive form of leukemia.
Cultural backgrounds of media organizations affect international news coverage
Researchers examined the photographic news coverage of a visit Pope Francis made to Cuba to determine how major media outlets from different countries covered the international event.
Social factors of patients affect hospital performance measures
A team of researchers led by a University of Colorado School of Medicine faculty member found that measures to evaluate readmission rates at children's hospitals would be more accurate if the social factors of the patients are included.
Study examines polyneuropathy and long-term opioid use
Polyneuropathy is a common painful condition, especially among older patients, which can result in functional impairment.
Researchers discover mechanism behind rapid smell source localization
Scientists at NERF (VIB-KU Leuven-imec) have provided fundamental insights into the mechanism of smell localization.
Study identifies RNA molecule that shields breast cancer stem cells from immune system
Researchers from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have identified a small RNA molecule that helps maintain the activity of stem cells in both healthy and cancerous breast tissue.
Risk of interval colorectal cancers higher among African-Americans
An American Cancer Society study of Medicare enrollees finds the risk for interval colorectal cancers, cancers that develop after a colonoscopy but before the next recommended test, is higher for blacks than whites.
Female peer mentors help retain college women in engineering
A new study by social psychologist Nilanjana Dasgupta and her Ph.D. student Tara C.
3.3-million-year-old fossil reveals origins of the human spine
Analysis of a 3.3 million-year-old fossil skeleton reveals the most complete spinal column of any early human relative, including vertebrae, neck and rib cage.
Researchers discover hottest lavas that erupted in past 2.5 billion years
An international team of researchers led by geoscientists with the Virginia Tech College of Science recently discovered that deep portions of Earth's mantle might be as hot as it was more than 2.5 billion years ago.
Weathering of rocks a poor regulator of global temperatures
Evidence from the age of the dinosaurs to today shows that chemical weathering of rocks is less sensitive to global temperature, and may depend on the steepness of the surface.
Paper: 'No admit-No deny' settlements undercut accountability in civil enforcement
The failure of federal watchdog agencies to require admissions of guilt from the targets of civil enforcement can trigger calls for greater accountability from the public, says a new paper from U. of I. law professors Verity Winship and Jennifer K.
New answers for kids with inherited kidney disease
A new gene behind a rare form of inherited childhood kidney disease has been identified by a global research team.
Protective responses appear weaker in neural stem cells from Huntington disease patients
A multi-institutional team based at Massachusetts General Hospital has discovered how a potential treatment strategy for Huntington disease (HD) produces its effects, verified its action in human cells and identified a previously unknown deficit in neural stem cells from patients with HD.
Himalayan powerhouses: How Sherpas have evolved superhuman energy efficiency
Sherpas have evolved to become superhuman mountain climbers, extremely efficient at producing the energy to power their bodies even when oxygen is scarce, suggests new research published today in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
Monash researchers uncover new gravitational wave characteristics
Monash researchers have identified a new concept -- 'orphan memory' -- which changes the current thinking around gravitational waves.
Female STEM leaders more likely to back policies aiding women
A national study of college and university administrators has found that female department chairs, deans and provosts have different attitudes and beliefs than their male counterparts about how to retain women professors in STEM fields.
The fungal microbiome contributes to alcohol-induced liver damage in mice
Alcoholism is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis-related deaths. Although chronic alcohol consumption is known to alter the gut microbiome, the link between these changes and liver damage is not well understood.
Lung disease patients say home oxygen delivery systems don't meet their needs
According to a new survey, patients with lung disease report that they are unable to obtain home oxygen equipment that meets their needs thereby forcing them to become isolated.
UNLV study: Warming news from Russia
UNLV research in Russia challenges widely held understanding of past climate history; study appears in latest issue of top journal Nature Geoscience.
Joint UTSA-SwRI study shows how radioactive decay could support extraterrestrial life
In the icy bodies around our solar system, radiation emitted from rocky cores could break up water molecules and support hydrogen-eating microbes.
People perceive attractive scientists as more interesting but less able, studies show
A new study published today in Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) from researchers at the University of Cambridge and the University of Essex suggests that when it comes to judging scientists, we are more likely to find an attractive scientist interesting, but more likely to consider their less attractive colleagues to be better scientists.
Extreme preterm infant death or disease may be predicted by biomarker
Tests of cells collected from the umbilical cord blood vessel walls at birth can predict death or poor pulmonary outcomes in extremely preterm infants, say researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
Field of 'sexting' research finds little to worry about
A recent analysis of research into how so-called 'sexting' may affect sexual behavior finds that it has little impact on sexual activity -- but highlights significant shortcomings in the research itself.
Deep sleep maintains the learning efficiency of the brain
For the first time, researchers of the University of Zurich and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich have demonstrated the causal context of why deep sleep is important to the learning efficiency of the human brain.
Wafer-thin magnetic materials developed for future quantum technologies
Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified.
The right thing to do: Why do we follow unspoken group rules?
How you dress, talk, eat and even what you allow yourself to feel -- these often unspoken rules of a group are social norms, and many are internalized to such a degree that you probably don't even notice them.
Research suggests eating beans instead of beef would sharply reduce greenhouse gasses
If Americans would eat beans instead of beef, the United States would immediately realize approximately 50 to 75 percent of its GHG reduction targets for the year 2020.
Researchers find computer code that Volkswagen used to cheat emissions tests
An international team of researchers has uncovered the mechanism that allowed Volkswagen to circumvent US and European emission tests over at least six years before the Environmental Protection Agency put the company on notice in 2015 for violating the Clean Air Act.
Rotavirus vaccination in infants and young children
Rotaviruses (RV) are the commonest cause of diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide.
Genes responsible for severe congenital heart disease identified by Pitt researcher
Genes responsible for hypoplastic left heart syndrome identified using mouse models.
Wearable vision systems reveal more than a 'highway in the sky'
Significant commercial investment in wearable vision systems for personal communications and entertainment is driving rapid advances in miniature optoelectronics components and consumer-driven applications.
Raised blood platelet levels 'strong predictor' of cancer
Having a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, according to a large-scale study.
New method: Water mapping around solutes
Chemists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a new method that allows them to map changes in the dynamics and structure of water molecules in the vicinity of solutes.
Researchers pinpoint how diesel fumes could cause 'flare up' of respiratory symptoms
Scientists have shown how diesel fumes trigger respiratory reflexes which could potentially worsen underlying conditions, such as asthma.
Finnish study: Half of patients recover to baseline function after refractory status epilepticus
Three in four patients with refractory status epilepticus treated in an intensive care unit (ICU) are still alive a year later, and half of them have recovered to baseline function, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland.
Mindfulness takes practice
Mindfulness meditation practice is set at 45 minutes a day at home, as well as weekly group sessions with the teacher.
Awareness of controversial Arizona immigration law influenced male students' classroom behavior
US-born Latino male middle school students who had familiarity with a controversial Arizona immigration-enforcement bill had more difficulty exhibiting proper behavior in the classroom, such as following instructions and staying quiet, according to a new study by researchers at Arizona State University and the University of Kansas.
Flexible new method for early cancer diagnosis
Earlier discovery of cancer and greater precision in the treatment process are the objectives of a new method developed by researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy and Boston University.
Two simple building blocks produce complex 3-D material
Northwestern University scientists have built a structurally complex material from two simple building blocks that is the lowest-density metal-organic framework ever made.
New research could help develop drugs to better address heart problems in diabetics
Research published in Experimental Physiology shows that diabetes-induced changes in heartbeat are primarily regulated by the β1-adrenoceptor.
Sleep apnea may increase atrial fibrillation risk
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation (AF), according to new research presented at the ATS 2017 International Conference.
Obamacare support: When polls mention repeal it seals the deal
Does the American public want former President Obama's health care law repealed and replaced?
Better, cheaper healthcare with dry blood samples
A drop of blood on filter paper, allowed to dry and stored for future diagnostic purposes -- considerably easier than the present-day, resource-consuming method using frozen blood samples in plastic tubes.
Supercomputing helps researchers understand Earth's interior
University of Illinois geologist Lijun Liu and his team have created a computer model of tectonic activity so effective that they believe it has potential to predict where earthquakes and volcanoes will occur.
An elegans solution: Worm genetic screen maps cell-to-cell communication in human cancer
In the May 22, 2017, issue of Developmental Cell, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina Hollings Cancer Center developed a cross-species genetic screen in worms to follow cell-to-cell communication in human cancer.
New clues emerge about how fruit flies navigate their world
Janelia Research Campus scientists have uncovered new clues about how fruit flies keep track of where they are in the world.
Scientists identify a neural circuit that rotates a fly's internal compass
Researchers have uncovered the neurons that spin a fly's internal compass when the insect turns -- the first such mechanism identified in any animal.
Conservation and nameless earthworms: Assessors in the dark?
Earthworms help to ensure that ecosystems thrive. However, people find it hard to relate to animals that are known by their scientific names only.
Chronic anabolic steroid use may damage heart, arteries
Long-term anabolic steroid use may impair the heart's ability to pump blood throughout the body and relax between beats.
Micro delivery service for fertilizers
Plants can absorb nutrients through their leaves as well as their roots.
Next-gen computing: Memristor chips that see patterns over pixels
Inspired by how mammals see, a new 'memristor' computer circuit prototype at the University of Michigan has the potential to process complex data, such as images and video orders of magnitude, faster and with much less power than today's most advanced systems.
New cancer drug can prevent reactions to common airborne allergens
A cancer drug for patients with certain types of leukemia and lymphoma can also prevent reactions to some of the most common airborne allergies, according to a recent Northwestern Medicine study.
RIT team creates high-speed internet lane for emergency situations
Rochester Institute of Technology are developing a faster and more reliable way to send and receive large amounts of data through the internet.
High levels of prenatal air pollution exposure and stress increase childhood asthma risk
A new study has found that children, especially boys, whose mothers were exposed to higher levels of outdoor particulate air pollution at the same time that they were very stressed were most likely to develop asthma by age six.
Scientists find 7.2-million-year-old pre-human remains in the Balkans
Scientists analyzing 7.2 million-year-old fossils uncovered in modern-day Greece and Bulgaria suggest a new hypothesis about the origins of humankind, placing it in the Eastern Mediterranean and not -- as customarily assumed -- in Africa, and earlier than currently accepted.
Wild geese in China are 'prisoners' in their own wetlands
In many places in the world, goose populations are booming as the birds have moved out of their wetland habitats to exploit an abundance of food on farmland.
Calcium dynamics regulating the timing of decision-making in C. elegans
All animals make decisions according to information, but the detailed mechanism is not known.
Pulmonary Thrombosis-on-a-Chip provides new avenue for drug development
Researchers at the Wyss Institute have engineered a model of human pulmonary thrombosis using its Organ-on-a-Chip platform that mimics in vivo blood clot formation and confirms the transmission of inflammatory signals from the pulmonary epithelium to the vascular endothelium, providing a new model for investigation and treatment/prevention of pulmonary blood clots.
Discovery may offer hope to Parkinson's disease patients
Research led by the University of Sydney's Brain and Mind Centre has found a protein abnormality linked to brain cell loss in people with Parkinson's disease that is also present in some inherited forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
Researchers suppress fibrosis chemical signal to block haywire healing
An injured body always seeks to heal. But that process is far from simple.
Ultrafast nanophotonics: Turmoil in sluggish electrons' existence
An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behavior of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time.
Reimbursement for integrative health care suggests violation of non-discrimination law
A new study shows that the likelihood of health insurance reimbursement for some common clinical services differs significantly depending on whether they are provided by a complementary healthcare service provider or a primary care physician.
NASA lab's life-saving work
Some NASA missions fundamentally change the world of science or help win Nobel prizes, but only one saves thousands of lives worldwide every year.
TWEAKing inflammation
Superficially, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis may appear similar but their commonalities are only skin deep.
Experimental therapy for immune diseases hits Achilles heel of activated T cells
Immune diseases like multiple sclerosis and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis unleash destructive waves of inflammation on the body, causing death or a lifetime of illness and physical impairment.
The Optical Society commemorates the rich tradition and history of Optics Letters
First launched in 1977 as as means to quickly disseminate the latest in optics research and provide the optics and photonics community with a true Letters-style publication, Optics Letters has, over the course of its long history, published influential papers in nonlinear optics, ultrafast spectroscopy, fiber optics, optical communication, and biomedical optics among other areas.
Smoke from wildfires can have lasting climate impact
Researchers have found that carbon particles released into the air from burning trees and other organic matter are much more likely than previously thought to travel to the upper levels of the atmosphere, where they can interfere with rays from the sun -- sometimes cooling the air and at other times warming it.

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