Nav: Home

Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | May 29, 2017


Competition recognizes neuromodulation research that may facilitate expanded, tailored care
The International Neuromodulation Society has selected six best scientific abstracts for its 13th World Congress whose research findings represent insights that may facilitate expanded, increasingly tailored care.
New discovery: Cormorants can hear under water
For the first time, researchers have shown that a marine birds can hear under water.
New species of frog from the Neotropics carries its heart on its skin
In the Neotropics, there is a whole group of so-called glassfrogs that amaze with their transparent skin covering their bellies and showing their organs underneath.
Cells pumping iron to prevent anemia
Researchers identify the gene Regnase-1 as a regulator for iron metabolism by degrading Transferrin Receptor 1 (TfR1) mRNA.
High-fat diet alters reward system in rats
Exposure to high-fat diet from childhood may increase the sensitivity of the dopamine system later in adulthood, according to a study in male rats published in eNeuro.
New test method aims to predict allergenic potency of chemicals
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a method which determines not only whether a chemical or substance is allergenic, but also how strong its potential for causing hypersensitivity is.
Healing wounds with cell therapy
An experimental treatment in mice allows the reprogramming of blood cells in order to promote the healing process of cutaneous wounds.
Previously, on Arctic warming
Arctic warming occurred in the early 20th century due to the warming phases -- 'interdecadal variability mode' -- of both the Pacific and Atlantic oceans coincided.
Historical rainfall levels are significant in carbon emissions from soil
Researchers from the University of Texas at Austin have discovered that soil microbes from historically wetter sites are more sensitive to moisture and emit significantly more carbon than microbes from historically drier regions.
Connecting the dots between dreams and brain disease
Dr. John Peever from University of Toronto has unveiled a connection between sleep disorders and neurodegenerative conditions like Parkinson's Disease.
Engines fire without smoke
Car manufacturers could clean up vehicle exhausts using a new model of gasoline combustion developed using experimental data.
A new spin on electronics
A University of Utah-led team has discovered that a class of 'miracle materials
Children at Swedish 'gender-neutral' preschools are less likely to gender-stereotype
A new study from Uppsala University in Sweden has indicated that the norm-conscious practices used by teachers at preschools termed 'gender-neutral' are associated with reductions in children's tendencies to make gender-stereotypical assumption.
'Heat island' effect could double climate change costs for world's cities
Overheated cities face climate change costs at least twice as big as the rest of the world because of the 'urban heat island' effect, new research shows.
Detailed view of a molecular toxin transporter
Transport proteins in the cells of our body protect us from particular toxins.
Hotspots show that vegetation alters climate by up to 30 percent
Nature Geoscience study analyzes global satellite observations, shows vegetation alters climate and weather patterns by as much as 30 percent.
Toward an HIV cure: Pitt team develops test to detect hidden virus
The quest to develop a cure for HIV has long been plagued by a seemingly simple question: how do doctors determine if someone is cured?
How self-regulation can help young people overcome setbacks
In a recent study researchers analyzed whether self-regulation would be a good predictor of resilience.
A network of crystals for long-distance quantum communication
Quantum physic can guarantee that a message has not be intercepted.
First Nations, Inuit babies hospitalized more often in first year of life
First Nations and Inuit babies were hospitalized much more often in the first year of life compared with non-Indigenous babies, many for preventable illnesses, found a new study of infant hospitalizations in Quebec, Canada, published in CMAJ.
Death by volcano?
he discovery of anomalously high levels of mercury in rocks from the Ordivician geological period has led to a new interpretation of the ensuing mass extinction.
Remembrance of things past -- bacterial memory of gut inflammation
A team at the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering led by Pamela Silver, Ph.D., designed a powerful bacterial sensor with a stable gene circuit in a colonizing bacterial strain that can record gut inflammation for six months in mice.
Tobacco hybrid emits low-toxicant, e-cig-like vapor with enhanced flavor
Chemical analysis has revealed no detectable difference between the vapours produced by an e-cigarette and a novel tobacco hybrid, (iFuse).
Graphene and quantum dots put in motion a CMOS-integrated camera that can see the invisible
ICFO develops the first graphene-based camera, capable of imaging visible and infrared light at the same time.
Climate change can alter the impact of forest pathogens in trees
New research on projected climate changes from the University of Helsinki indicates that climate change has an alarming potential to increase the damage caused to Norway spruce trees by a naturally circulating disease spreading fungus.
Study finds greater risk of extinction among high diversity amphibian groups
Simon Fraser University researchers who examined evolutionary patterns of modern extinction risk across more than 300 amphibian groups found that species from groups with high ongoing diversification are at greater risk of extinction than slowly diversifying lineages.
HIV: A therapeutic advance for resource-limited settings
ANRS 12286 MOBIDIP, a clinical trial running in parallel in three countries in sub-Saharan Africa, shows that dual therapy with lamivudine and a boosted protease inhibitor is effective as second-line treatment in patients infected by HIV with multiple mutations.
Pediatric IBD patients not meeting recommended calcium and vitamin D intake
The study found that only 26.6 percent and 21.3 percent of sufferers were achieving the current recommended intake of calcium and vitamin D respectively.
How the visual cortex changes from birth to old age
A study of post-mortem brain tissue reveals the human primary visual cortex (V1) develops gradually throughout life.
Neurons can learn temporal patterns
Individual neurons can learn not only single responses to a particular signal, but also a series of reactions at precisely timed intervals.
Biologics before triple therapy not cost effective for rheumatoid arthritis
Stepping up to biologic therapy when methotrexate monotherapy fails offers minimal incremental benefit over using a combination of drugs known as triple therapy, yet incurs large costs for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
New antibiotic packs a punch against bacterial resistance
Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have given new superpowers to a lifesaving antibiotic called vancomycin, an advance that could eliminate the threat of antibiotic-resistant infections for years to come.
Novel method to study quantum fluctuations in exotic phases of matter
An Osaka University-led international research team finds link between quantum fluctuations and the effective charge of current carrying particles to understand exotic phases of matter.
Quantum states reveal themselves with measurable 'fingerprint'
Researchers working in Singapore and the United States have discovered that all entangled states of two particles have a classical 'fingerprint.' This breakthrough could help engineers guard against errors and devices that don't do what they promise in quantum computing and quantum cryptography.
Squeezing every drop of fresh water from waste brine
Engineers at the University of California, Riverside have developed a new way to recover almost 100 percent of the water from highly concentrated salt solutions.
CRISPR gene editing can cause hundreds of unintended mutations
Researchers report that CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology can introduce hundreds of unintended mutations into the genome.
The immune system promotes spontaneous heart regeneration
Osaka University scientists show the immune response to myocarditis promotes cardiomyocyte regeneration in mice.
Stopping drug abuse can reverse related heart damage
Quitting methamphetamine use can reverse the damage the drug causes to the heart and improve heart function in abusers when combined with appropriate medical treatment, potentially preventing future drug-related cases of heart failure or other worse outcomes, according to a study published today in JACC: Heart Failure.
Model for 2-D materials based RRAM found
The group lead by Prof. Mario Lanza develops a resistive random access memory device using only 2-D materials (graphene electrodes and hexagonal boron nitride insulators), and develop a complete theoretical model to describe its functioning.
Legalizing marijuana will harm health of youth in Canada
The federal government's bill C-45 to legalize marijuana in Canada will jeopardize the health of young people and Parliament should vote against it, argues the interim editor-in-chief of CMAJ in an editorial.
Vision keeps maturing until mid-life
The visual cortex, the human brain's vision-processing centre that was previously thought to mature and stabilize in the first few years of life, actually continues to develop until sometime in the late 30s or early 40s, a McMaster neuroscientist and her colleagues have found.
Some heart attack patients may not benefit from beta blockers
New research challenges established medical practice that all heart attack patients should be on beta blockers.
Increasing the age limit for Lynch syndrome genetic testing may save lives
Raising the age limit for routine genetic testing in colorectal cancer could identify more cases of families affected by Lynch syndrome, a condition that accounts for around 5 percent of all colon cancers.
Too much stress for the mother affects the baby through amniotic fluid
If the mother is stressed over a longer period of time during pregnancy, the concentration of stress hormones in amniotic fluid rises, as proven by an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Zurich.
Wake-promoting compound validated
Narcolepsy, a serious sleep disorder in which patients often fall asleep uncontrollably, has been incurable because no effective therapeutic agents are available to date.

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Wow-er
School's out, but many kids–and their parents–are still stuck at home. Let's keep learning together. Special guest Guy Raz joins Manoush for an hour packed with TED science lessons for everyone.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#565 The Great Wide Indoors
We're all spending a bit more time indoors this summer than we probably figured. But did you ever stop to think about why the places we live and work as designed the way they are? And how they could be designed better? We're talking with Emily Anthes about her new book "The Great Indoors: The Surprising Science of how Buildings Shape our Behavior, Health and Happiness".
Now Playing: Radiolab

The Third. A TED Talk.
Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.