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Science Current Events and Science News | Brightsurf | June 02, 2017


Study of kids with autism identifies hospitalization risk factors
With the goal of prevention, a new study of children and teens with autism spectrum disorders found five risk factors that are significantly associated with an increased likelihood of seeking inpatient psychiatric care.
Older patients have a higher pain tolerance after major surgery -- or do they?
New research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia meeting in Geneva (June 3-5) suggests that age plays a part in the level of pain experienced after major surgery, with older people most likely to better tolerate serious post-operative pain.
STD treatment for 2?
In some states, patients who test positive for chlamydia or gonorrhea leave the clinic with not only a prescription for themselves, but also one for their sexual partner -- who was not seen by a doctor.
Frailer patients at much greater risk of institutional care and death after discharge from hospital
Independent of age, frail patients are almost twice as likely to die in the year following admission to critical care, and even more likely to need nursing home care after discharge from hospital, compared with patients who are not frail, according to new research presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress in Geneva (June 3-5).
Combination therapy targets genetic mutation found in many cancers
A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has shown promise for effective treatment of therapy-resistant cancers caused by a mutation of the RAS gene found in many cancers.
Recreational running benefits hip and knee joint health
Recreational runners are less likely to experience knee and hip osteoarthritis compared to sedentary individuals and competitive runners, according to a new study published in the June issue of the Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (JOSPT).
Dairy products a good dietary source of some types of vitamin K
A new study finds that US dairy products are a significant source of the MK form of vitamin K and indicates that MK forms of the nutrient are more present in commonly-consumed foods than previously thought.
Queen's researcher's 'miracle material' discovery could end cracked smart devices
A Queen's University researcher has led an international team of scientists to the discovery of a new material, which could finally bring an end to the misery of cracked smartphone and tablet screens.
Secukinumab and ixekizumab in psoriasis: Considerable added benefit for certain patients
There were notably more remissions than under the comparator therapies.
Eco-label in exchange for less chemicals on rice fields
Money isn't always everything: Taiwanese rice farmers are willing to produce in an environ-mentally friendly fashion if this would earn them an eco-label.
Specific long-term therapy may not prevent fractures in older women
Bisphosphonates are sometimes used to treat osteoporosis. Studies have shown that the risk for bone fractures lessens when women with low bone mineral density take these medications for between one and four years.
Low-dose THC can relieve stress; more does just the opposite
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Chicago report that low levels tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the main psychoactive compound in marijuana, does reduce stress, but in a highly dose-dependent manner.
DIY crystal-makers get refurbished online cookbook
In response to popular demand, materials scientists at Duke University have resurrected an online cookbook of crystalline structures that started when the World Wide Web was Netscape Navigator and HTML 1.0.
Configuration and manipulation of soft robotics for on-orbit servicing
Recently, a paper published in SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences reviews the status and development of soft robotics and a conceptual design of configuration and manipulation of space soft robot is proposed.
Are dense star clusters the origin of the gravitational waves discovered by LIGO?
Much to their surprise, scientists are finding dozens of black holes deep within densely packed collections of stars called globular clusters.
New mechanism behind Parkinson's disease revealed
OIST researchers have identified the precise toxic mechanism at work during an overabundance of the protein alpha-synuclein in neurons -- the protein is a key causative agent in the development of Parkinson's disease.
UQ physicist builds on Einstein and Galileo's work
Sixteenth century scientist Galileo Galilei threw two spheres of different mass from the top of the Leaning Tower of Pisa to establish a scientific principle.
Bone loss is another hidden pathology caused by malaria infection
Osaka University Researchers at the Immunology Frontier Research Center (IFReC) have discovered that malaria infection causes bone loss as a result of chronic bone inflammation induced by accumulated Plasmodium by-products in bone.
Fertility preservation for children with differences of sex development
Article explores unique ethical issues for children with differences of sex development on whether or not they should pursue fertility preservation.
Bacteria used as factories to produce cancer drugs
Researchers at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability in Denmark have developed a method of producing P450 enzymes -- used by plants to defend against predators and microbes -- in bacterial cell factories.
Herbs, spices on vegetables may increase their appeal to men, young adults
Seasonings may entice adults -- especially men and people under age 50 -- who don't generally eat vegetables at lunchtime into increasing their vegetable intake, suggests a new study led by Joanna Manero, a graduate student in food science and human nutrition at the University of Illinois.
One in 3 hospitalized patients experience symptoms of depression, study shows
About one in three hospitalized patients shows symptoms of depression, potentially affecting their clinical outcomes, a new Cedars-Sinai study has found.
Census shows which mammals survive in forests surrounded by sugarcane plantations
Researchers at São Paulo State University (UNESP) in Brazil have published a census of medium and large mammals found in 22 forest remnants surrounded by sugarcane plantations in the state.
Observation of the phase transition of liquid crystal defects for the first time
KAIST researchers observed the phase transition of topological defects formed by liquid crystal (LC) materials for the first time.
For older adults, antibiotics may not be appropriate treatment for some UTIs
In a new research paper published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Thomas E.
Citizen scientists uncover a cold new world near Sun
A new citizen-science tool released earlier this year to help astronomers pinpoint new worlds lurking in the outer reaches of our solar system has already led to a discovery: a brown dwarf a little more than 100 light years away from the Sun.
Genetic sequencing could influence treatment for nearly 3/4 of advanced cancer patients
A new analysis finds that nearly three-quarters of 500 patients with advanced cancer could be referred to a potential targeted treatment based on the results of a comprehensive analysis of their tumor's genetic landscape.
Timing meals later at night can cause weight gain and impair fat metabolism
New findings suggest eating late at night could be more dangerous than you think.
Patients nearing end of life receptive to having cholesterol medicine 'deprescribed'
New research suggests patients nearing the end of their lives because of a 'life-limiting illness' such as cancer or heart disease may not feel medically abandoned if their doctor wants to take them off the statins that control their cholesterol.
Antarctic ice rift close to calving, after growing 17km in 6 days -- latest data from ice shelf
The rift in the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica has grown by 17km in the last few days and is now only 13km from the ice front, indicating that calving of an iceberg is probably very close, Swansea University researchers revealed after studying satellite data.
Understanding a river's 'thermal landscape' may be the key to saving it
Inexpensive sensor technologies have enabled an explosion in the availability of river temperature data and in statistical models for understanding them.
Mice will help reveal the roles of human brown fat
Scientists have discovered that mice have metabolically active brown fat deposits similar to the largest depot found in people.
Olive oil nutrient linked to processes that prevent cancer in brain
Research into oleic acid -- the primary ingredient in olive oil -- has shown how it can help prevent cancer-causing genes from functioning in cells, and may help to prevent cancer developing in the brain.
Tumor induction from a distance
Researchers suggest that neighboring tissues can send signals inducing tumorigenesis.
Sydney Harbor emissions equivalent to 200 cars on the roads
The first footprint of Sydney Harbor's carbon emissions has found it is roughly equivalent to similar natural 'drowned river' estuaries in the US but significantly less than polluted water sources straddling build-up areas in Europe and Asia.
Catching the IMSI-catchers: SeaGlass brings transparency to cell phone surveillance
University of Washington security researchers have developed a new system called SeaGlass to detect anomalies in the cellular landscape that can indicate where and when IMSI-catchers, cell-site simulators and other devices used in cell phone surveillance are present.
NIH scientists try to crack the brain's memory codes
In a pair of studies, scientists at the National Institutes of Health explored how the human brain stores and retrieves memories.
Facial expressions can cause us problems in telling unfamiliar faces apart
Using hundreds of faces of actors from movies, psychologists from the University of Bristol have shown how facial expressions can get in the way of our ability to tell unfamiliar faces apart.
Deep magma reservoirs are key to volcanic 'super-eruptions', new research suggests
Large reservoirs of magma stored deep in the Earth's crust are key to producing some of the Earth's most powerful volcanic eruptions, new research has shown.
Chemical 'dance' of cobalt catalysis could pave way to solar fuels
In a new study, scientists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and Harvard University have been able to see for the first time an especially important chemical step in the process of splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen -- the basic reaction at the heart of creating entirely renewable fuels from solar energy.
Recommendations to optimize continuous glucose monitoring in diabetes clinical research
The advantages of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for obtaining real-time blood glucose measurements and its ability to detect and even predict hypo- and hyperglycemic events make it a very useful tool for evaluating experimental glucose-lowering drugs and new approaches for treating diabetes.
Details of Lassa virus structure could inform development of vaccines, therapies
A 10-year Lassa virus research project has yielded structural and functional details of a key viral surface protein that could help advance development of Lassa vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics, which are currently lacking.
International variation on definition of brain death must be cleared up to restore public confidence
A session at this year's Euroanaesthesia congress in Geneva, Switzerland (June 3-5) will focus on the international variation in the definition of death, which experts say must be cleared up to restore both public and professional confidence, and also to help improve management of patients at the end of life to improve successful organ donation.
Red light has no effect on bat activity: Less disruption by changing artificial color
Artificial light at night can have a disruptive effect on bats, but not if the light is red.
Scientists design molecular system for artificial photosynthesis
A molecular system for artificial photosynthesis is designed to mimic key functions of the photosynthetic center in green plants -- light absorption, charge separation, and catalysis -- to convert solar energy into chemical energy stored by hydrogen fuel.
Hubble 'traps' a vermin galaxy
This Hubble image shows a distant galaxy as it begins to align with and pass behind a star sitting nearer to us within the Milky Way.
Are soft contact lenses safe for children? Risks seem no higher than in adults
Available evidence suggests that soft contact lenses can be safely prescribed to children and adolescents, with no increase in adverse effects compared to adults, according to a review in the June issue of Optometry and Vision Science, the official journal of the American Academy of Optometry.
NASA sees strengthening and weakening of Tropical Depression Beatriz
NASA satellites have been keeping an eye on the tropical depression over southern Mexico that strengthened into a tropical storm for half of a day.
Radiocarbon dating of phytolith traces rice domestication to 10,000 years ago
The study of phytolith carbon-14 and morphological characteristics, by Prof.
Scientists launch global agenda to curb social, human rights abuses in seafood sector
As the United Nations Oceans Conference convenes in New York, a new paper calls on marine scientists to focus on social issues such as human rights violations in the seafood industry.
Follistatin is a key player in embryo implantation
Follistatin plays a key role in establishing receptivity of the uterus to embryo implantation in an animal model.
New ceramic nanofiber 'sponges' could be used for flexible insulation, water purification
Ceramic materials tend to shatter when deformed, but new research shows a way of using ultra-thin ceramic nanofibers to make squishy, heat-resistant sponges with a wide variety of potential uses.
New catalytic converter composite reduces rare earth element usage
Strict emissions regulations are important for maintaining the health of humans and the environment, but strict regulations also bring technological challenges to overcome.
Gene therapy could 'turn off' severe allergies
A single treatment giving life-long protection from severe allergies such as asthma could be made possible by immunology research at The University of Queensland.
Forensic chemical analysis of wood could stop illegal logging
Researchers at the USDA Forest Service have developed a technique to tackle illegal logging by pinpointing the wood's origin to a smaller area than ever before (<100 km).

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