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Science News | Science Current Events | Brightsurf | June 03, 2017


Adding abiraterone to standard treatment improves prostate cancer survival by 40 percent
Adding abiraterone to hormone therapy at the start of treatment for prostate cancer improves survival by 37 percent, according to the results of one of the largest ever clinical trials for prostate cancer.
Questions raised over physician-assisted suicide
Few issues in medicine have been more controversial in recent years than physician-assisted suicide, with medical experts and the general public unable to come to a consensus that balances the delicate issue of dying with dignity with the interests of the individual and society as a whole.
Lactobacillus from yogurt inhibits multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens
A Lactobacillus isolate from commercial yogurt, identified as Lactobacillus parafarraginis, inhibited the growth of several multidrug-resistant/extended spectrum β-lactamase bacteria from patients at a hospital in Washington, D.C.
Pregnancy after breast cancer does not increase chance of recurrence
Findings from a retrospective study of 1,200 women provide reassurance to breast cancer survivors who are contemplating pregnancy.
Enhanced test for urinary tract infections detects more bacteria than standard test
One of the primary ways physicians diagnose urinary tract infections is with a test that detects bacteria in urine.
Psychological intervention relieves distress in patients with advanced cancer
Advanced cancer triggers enormous distress and brings challenges that can seem overwhelming.
Immunotherapy drug effective for metastatic triple negative breast cancer
The immunotherapy drug, Pembrolizumab, is effective in shrinking tumors among metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients as found in a clinical trial led by NYU Langone's Perlmutter Cancer Center.
A single radiation treatment sufficiently relieves spinal cord compression symptoms
A common complication in people with metastatic cancer, spinal cord compression is a major detriment to quality of life.
New transplant technology could benefit patients with type 1 diabetes
Combining a new hydrogel material with a protein that boosts blood vessel growth could improve the success rate for transplanting insulin-producing islet cells into persons with type 1 diabetes.
Psychological intervention lowers survivors' fear of cancer recurrence
About 50 percent of all cancer survivors and 70 percent of young breast cancer survivors report moderate to high fear of recurrence.
Vaginal bacteria alter sexual transmission of Zika and herpes simplex virus-2
Bacteria in the vagina can inhibit sexually transmitted Zika virus and herpes simplex virus-2 in women, according to a new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.
Breastfeeding may protect against chronic pain after Caesarean section
Breastfeeding after a Caesarean section (C-section) may help manage pain, with mothers who breastfed their babies for at least two months after the operation three times less likely to experience persistent pain compared to those who breastfed for less than two months, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress in Geneva (June 3-5).
Technology leads to better treatment for Staphylococcus aureus sepsis
A new testing and treatment approach led to shorter hospital stays for patients with Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.
Remote therapy program improves quality of life, lowers distress after cancer diagnosis
Most patients experience significant distress after they are diagnosed with cancer.

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